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Visitors can now take a closer look at the Swing Bridge
Mar 6 2010 by Amy Hunt, Evening Chronicle



Visitors can now take a peek behind the scenes of one of Tyneside’s iconic bridges.

The Swing Bridge, which crosses the Tyne between Newcastle and Gateshead, was designed by industrialist William George Armstrong.

The movable bridge, which opened in June 1876, replaced a fixed bridge with the aim of allowing larger ships to sail upstream to Lord Armstrong’s works in Elswick.

Now, 200 years since the birth of Lord Armstrong, the public is offered the opportunity to see inside the motor room, which is still in full working order.

To mark the anniversary a descendent of Lord Armstrong paid his first visit to the bridge to see inside the engine room.

Francis Armstrong is heir to the Armstrong Estate and lives and works near Bamburgh. He said: “It has been a pleasure to visit the bridge for the first time and a privilege to look inside the motor room. Everything is immaculate.

“To see it operating so well is not just a testament to its current keepers, George Fenwick and Port of Tyne, but to Lord Armstrong who designed it.

“The Swing Bridge is also a lasting legacy to his Newcastle workforce who possessed a huge amount of engineering skill and ability. Visiting the bridge is a great way to celebrate Lord Armstrong’s life and achievements.”

Until the Millennium Bridge came along, the Swing Bridge was the only one of the Tyne’s bridges which moved.

Since the closure of Dunston Staithes in 1980, the Swing Bridge openings have become less common, though swings have increased in recent years as pleasure boats pass through. In 2009 there were 13 swings compared to 6,000 in the peak year of 1924 and 900 a year in the 1970s.

Andrew Moffat, chief executive of the Port of Tyne, said: “Whilst the Port of Tyne’s archives were donated to Tyne & Wear Museums when the port sold its former headquarters based in Bewick House Newcastle, we remain very proud of our interesting and historical sites, which are open to the public during the heritage open weekends every September.

“Our aim is to create a vibrant, sustainable Port of Tyne and while a key value to achieving this is looking to future new opportunities, we see the significant annual investment on these important sites as protecting the region’s rich heritage.”

If you would like to visit the engine room call Gillian Scott on 0191 455 2671.
 

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Discussion Starter #822
Admiral Lord Collingwood - his 200th Anniversary.


North East pays tribute to Admiral Lord Collingwood
Mar 8 2010 by Tony Henderson, The Journal



HE was described yesterday as one of Newcastle’s greatest sons, a Northumbrian heart of oak, a great Englishman and a saviour of the nation.

The tributes were paid to Admiral Lord Collingwood at a public service of commemoration at St Nicholas Cathedral in Newcastle on the 200th anniversary – to the day – of his death at sea.

The service was held just yards away from where naval hero Cuthbert Collingwood was born in the Side 261 years ago, the son of a trader, and in the church where he was baptised and married.

A wreath was laid at the monument to Collingwood in the cathedral by Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope, First Sea Lord and chief of the naval staff.

He spoke of Collingwood’s key role in the Battle of Trafalgar against the combined French and Spanish fleets.

Collingwood’s ship Royal Sovereign was the first to engage the enemy and he took over command of the fleet when his close friend of more than 30 years Lord Nelson was killed, and also had to contend with a huge storm after the battle which battered the surviving ships.

Sir Mark said: “He played an important role in many of Nelson’s victories and was to do so again at Trafalgar.

“He was also a man of humanity who was ahead of his time. He strove to improve the conditions of the sailors of the day, was against flogging and press gangs, and showed courage and a steadfast commitment to duty.”

Collingwood, who made his family home at Morpeth, spent 44 of his 49-year naval service at sea.

The Very Rev Christopher Dalliston, Dean of Newcastle, said: “Admiral Collingwood is a hero of the past but continues to inspire respect and admiration and he is remembered for his courage and humanity.”

Max Adams, Gateshead-based biographer of Collingwood, told the congregation that the true character of the man was shown in the letters he sent home, some of which were read out at the service by the Admiral’s descendants.

“In these letters he laid bare his heart to those he loved,” said Mr Adams. Peter Warwick, chairman of the 1805 Club which is dedicated to the Georgian navy, said: “Nelson recognised that Collingwood was a brave and a good man. He wrote to Collingwood saying that no man has more confidence in another than I have in you.”

The choir of Newcastle Royal Grammar School, where Collingwood was a pupil, performed at the service, which was preceded by a naval parade through the city, with Sir Mark and the Lord Mayor of Newcastle, Mike Cookson, taking the salute.

The parade involved more than 200 representatives from the Royal Navy and was led by the Royal Marines Band.



Captain Stephen Healy, chairman of the Collingwood 2010 Festival Committee, said last night: “The crowds were fantastic and the weather could not have been better.

“I think Admiral Lord Collingwood would have been quietly embarrassed by all the fuss we have made of him.”

Last night at Christ Church in North Shields, where the Collingwood family owned Chirton House, there was a special ringing of the bells which would have been sounded to celebrate the victory at Trafalgar. There was also a night of events at the Collingwood Arms in Jesmond in Newcastle.

And North Tyneside Council has taken out of storage its painting of Collingwood, which is now on display in the Quadrant, the authority’s headquarters at Cobalt Business Park, above the council chamber entrance.


 

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But, is the white cross symbol/marker in white cobbles (see article above) still there in the roundabout?
There is no mini roundabout anymore. It's between the Gate & the new Debenhams store in the new part of Eldon Square. Will take a walk up in the next day or two and see if there's any sign of a White cross anywhere
 

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Discussion Starter #825 (Edited)
There is no mini roundabout anymore. It's between the Gate & the new Debenhams store in the new part of Eldon Square. Will take a walk up in the next day or two and see if there's any sign of a White cross anywhere

Hi Stamford, welcome to the forum!!

Thanks for planning to go along and have a look. Every time I have been along there, in the new Debenhams etc, I have completely forgotten to look!

I think that if you find there is no marker anywhere, then we should try and do something about that.

As the articles a few posts back showed, this is an important area in Newcastle's History. The WW1 Armistice Day newspaper cuttings that Alf posted really confirmed that.

The White Cross was clearly a famous and well known "place to meet" in 1918!

BELOW, you can 'just' see the most recent memorial of the location of the White Cross. In amongst the cobbles of the mini-roundabout in Newgate Street, the white cross is marked in white cobbles and can more clearly be seen in the first of the two photos . . .


 

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There's that glass sculpture thing. I was wondering the other day whether that's on the same point as the white cross?
Hard to say. It is in a similar position.

 

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Just got back from town, i went past debenhams. Just outside of debenhams there are 2 plaque's either side of the entrance. One is about Newgate Street and the other is . . . . yes, you guessed it, about White Cross :):)

(I took a photo of them, not the best photo's BUT i will add them later on)
 

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I found this extremely ironic.

Bought some of the old OS maps the other day, for some research i'm doing and obviously had a look at the area I live in.

Some of the weekend residents of Jurys and local charvers must be historians as I now know (see below) why they all choose to relieve themselves beneath my balcony (overlooking the pedestrian archway through to Jurys Inn).



This is the 1914 (godfrey edition)Tyneside sheet 18 - Newcastle & Gateshead on a scale of 15" to the mile.

On a serious note though, if anyone has any pics of this area (pre Centre For Life) I'd be interested to see them.
 

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I found this extremely ironic.

Bought some of the old OS maps the other day, for some research i'm doing and obviously had a look at the area I live in.

Some of the weekend residents of Jurys and local charvers must be historians as I now know (see below) why they all choose to relieve themselves beneath my balcony (overlooking the pedestrian archway throught to Jurys Inn).



This is the 1914 (godfrey edition)Tyneside sheet 18 - Newcastle & Gateshead on a scale of 15" to the mile.

On a serious note though, if anyone has any pics of this area (pre Centre For Life) I'd be interested to see them.
:lol: some things never change.
 

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I found this extremely ironic.

Bought some of the old OS maps the other day, for some research i'm doing and obviously had a look at the area I live in.

Some of the weekend residents of Jurys and local charvers must be historians as I now know (see below) why they all choose to relieve themselves beneath my balcony (overlooking the pedestrian archway through to Jurys Inn).



This is the 1914 (godfrey edition)Tyneside sheet 18 - Newcastle & Gateshead on a scale of 15" to the mile.

On a serious note though, if anyone has any pics of this area (pre Centre For Life) I'd be interested to see them.
This image is from the Newcastle Photostream and has been previously posted on this thread .. it shows the forth goods yard and cattle market area during the mid 20th century :eek:kay:

 

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The Historic Markets of Newcastle upon Tyne.
Some still with us, some long gone . . .

No. 2 - The White Cross Market
Newgate Street
Nr. Low Friar Street.


The White Cross Market is reputed to be the OLDEST market in the City, and it had a memorial spire erected to preserve its location, as explained below . . .




There is no mini roundabout anymore. It's between the Gate & the new Debenhams store in the new part of Eldon Square. Will take a walk up in the next day or two and see if there's any sign of a White cross anywhere
There's that glass sculpture thing. I was wondering the other day whether that's on the same point as the white cross?
Hi Stamford, welcome to the forum!!

Thanks for planning to go along and have a look. Every time I have been along there, in the new Debenhams etc, I have completely forgotten to look!

I think that if you find there is no marker anywhere, then we should try and do something about that.

As the articles a few posts back showed, this is an important area in Newcastle's History. The WW1 Armistice Day newspaper cuttings that Alf posted really confirmed that.

The White Cross was clearly a famous and well known "place to meet" in 1918!

BELOW, you can see the most recent memorial of the location of the White Cross. In amongst the cobbles of the mini-roundabout in Newgate Street, the white cross is marked in white cobbles and is more clearly seen in the first of the two photos . . .


Just got back from town, i went past debenhams. Just outside of debenhams there are 2 plaque's either side of the entrance. One is about Newgate Street and the other is . . . . yes, you guessed it, about White Cross :):)

(I took a photo of them, not the best photo's BUT i will add them later on)
Here are the photos that I took

The White Cross Plaque (which is immediately to the left of debenhams as you exit)






The Newgate Plaque (which is immediately to the right of debenhams as you exit)



Just realised now i should have taken a photo of the plaque's as they look "in relation to the Debenhams Department store entrance" to clearly illustrate exactly where they are - what a clown :bash::bash: maybe next time :)

.
 

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There are loads of great photos on the Facebook Old Newcastle & East End group, particularly of Shieldfield. What strikes me is how much better Newcastle looks overall than 20 yrs ago - lots of scruffy tatty buildings and streets then. We often moan about loss of good buildings but an awful lot of grot has gone and the public realm is a lot better, even if some of the new buildings could have been better.
 

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Discussion Starter #836 (Edited)
Greg - "Spooky" that you have just mentioned that site, as my sister has only just (yesterday) drawn my attention to that very same site!!

Here is the LINK she sent me . . .

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=photos&gid=356770076261

I will now add it to the "WEBSITES" (listing) thread on our forum.


Can I again ask everyone on here, to PLEASE let me know about sites like this one (that they know about) that are not already on the "WEBSITES" thread.

I can then add them to the thread, so that we can all share and enjoy them!!



.
 

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Thank you, Johnnypd, for that wonderful picture of the Cattle Market. I have searched for years for pictures of that area but they seem to be rare. There are a couple on the Newcastle Libraries site but otherwise nothing. I lived in Gateshead but travelled to school in Newcastle via the Redheugh Bridge (the old one) and Marlborough Crescent Bus Station and we were often delayed on the bridge by herds of cattle or sheep being driven across to market. Farmers used to keep the livestock on the Gateshead side of the river overnight and then take them over the bridge, often during the rush hour. It was a nightmare when on occasions some of the cows would make a break for it and cause severe delays until they were recaptured. Fortunately, my school was very understanding about the problem. Can you imagine trying that excuse now?
 

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Discussion Starter #839
I posted it on the previous page NH.

Although I didn't make it clear what the link was to be fair.

Yes, I see it now.

I haven't had time to look through it fully yet, but is this a new site?

It's just strange that three people have now (suddenly) mentioned it!!

Whether it is new or not, it certainly looks promising.
 
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