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I am starting this thread on Renewable Energy for India. There are pros and cons for topic.

To start of I am pro-Renewable Energy for India. This is major strategic initiative to kick the habit from Coal/Oil based products. Coal and Oil based products are major polluters contributing to tonnes of CO2 emission per year. India is currently producing around 70% of its energy from Coal based plants.

The current initiatives in renewable energy are a) Wind b) Jatropha biodiesel c) Solar Energy d) Ocean Tidal wave energy.

Wind is a well established technology and depends on the wind map of the country. The current estimates for Wind are around 60,000 MW on land. Offshore there is more potential.

Solar Energy is promising since India gets a lot of sunshine throughout the year. Some experts estimate that the Solar Energy Shone on India is sufficient to power its energy needs. The major stumbling blocks are solar to electric conversion are costly (though recent advances in California put it a grid parity cost, i.e. cost have come down to the same level as other conventional energy on a per unit basis).

One promising use for solar is home water heaters. This is not very expensive and people with independent homes can avail of this technology today. Lots of home have solar water heaters on their rooftops, the sun heating small tubes of water in a glass planel and hot water collected in an insulated tank. For those days that do not have sunlight an in-line heater element heats up water. So on balance, for a majority of the time people can enjoy hot water. Commercial establishments like laundries and hotels can make use of solar water heaters.

Coming to the issue of electricity from Solar there are various other alternatives that produce electricity. One instance in Seville, Spain uses reflecting mirrors to heat a liquid that runs an engine to produce electricity. This technology is being pursued by PG&E in Southern California for a 500 MW + plant. I believe that the best way to mitigate energy use is to have individual homes with Solar energy. During day time they can produce electricity returned to the grid and during night they take back from the grid. The savings could be substantial and conventional systems can augment deficit power.

India is also looking to increase its Nuclear Energy program.

Here is con argument from dis.agree

you cannot just shutdown & bring up coal based plants on a daily basis. they run for long durations and provide base load power. i am surprised you say that india has highest potential to reap solar energy. i am yet to see any decent paper on this.

while operational cost of solar power is near zero, it is highly capital intensive. there is still some distance to go from technology perspective. thin films is the most promising technology. it's efficiency is low but it compensates through lower capital needs. but even that on a levelized cost perpective is about 3-10 times expensive in western countries (at locations with good insolation levels). this however depends on discount rates used. you will not find indian banks lending at such low 5% interest rates. best you could hope for now is 10%. solar technology is still unproven & i doubt any serious bank would lend at all. you need equity but indian investors expect a much higher roi and so large scale solar projects would be financially unviable in india.

your view that oil imports benefit sheiks, while mainstream, is not free market thinking. they export oil and import other stuff. it is just a globalized economy. and that way we can argue against solar & wind energy as well. we are dependent capital intensive technology that are more expensive than fossils: usa for solar & europe for wind.

we definitely need to move away from coal, oil & gas. i am not saying this because of global warming of which i have reasons to be skeptical, but because oil production has started to decline for a few years now. gas too would follow very soon and coal possibly in next 2 decades. so, we must look at alternatives - nuclear & wind is the best short term option and in medium-long term solar.

indian government does not have that kind of money to subsidize such renewable energy. in any case, best way to get this done is to leave the markets to function freely. if state electricity boards allow/simplify sale of such power produced by independent producers directly to consumers and allow them to enter into long term contracts, i am sure we would soon see more such renewable energy generation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Renewable energy plans are gaining steam very rapidly. Make no mistake that nations that race towards a sustainable future will be the leaders in the world. Towards this goal India must be cognizant of its needs and also of its growth potential. Very soon all nations will get together and put meaningful caps on C02 emission. The biggest culprits happen to be coal based plants. The solutions are daunting for the moment because the problems seems insurmountable. Sustained 24x7 power is cheaply produced by coal plants. But the penalties are mounting.

Countries like the US and even China to some extent are moving very aggressively to meet the challenge. Obama has given a goal of 25% renewable energy by 2025 for the US. The US can meet this goal by Wind alone, its wind map has the potential of producing 3x the current total power of the US. Wind energy in the US is the fastest growing industry and now is the largest the world. The wind energy industry installed over 2,800 megawatts (MW) of new generating capacity in the first quarter of 2009 and the U.S. is now 28,206 MW, enough to serve over 8 million homes. The biggest problem the US faces is that there is no grid infra in remote places like Montana to evacuate Wind power.

India needs to evolve a roadmap for aggressive renewable energy usage. I see only Solar in its future. The only solutions is distributed power generation as opposed to central systems. Each household and industry needs its own power supply based on Solar. Low wattage systems (including LED bulbs) which reduces the per person consumption of power is the only way forward. I see this as boost for innovation in all kinds of industry. Every appliance can be rethought along the lines of a Tata Nano. Refrigeration, fans, lights, electrical grinders/household appliances all of them. Once this figure is reduced to a bare minimum then the problems don't look too insurmountable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The best and most effective way to adopt renewable energy is to solve day to day problems of the ordinary man/family especially for the Indian Context.

Rural India could really benefit from Solar Energy. Simple things that can enable rural farmers/family

1) Cooking with Solar Appliances

2) Rudimentary Lighting in Villages

3) Operation of the irrigation water pump - currently some states provide this as freebie.

My brother on a trekking trip in the Himalayas told me how an enterprising dweller in the area provided chai (tea) for travelers. He used a rudimentary solar reflector to heat up water piping hot to make tea. Of course it takes a while, but the volumes needed are not much. Cooking with Solar has been demonstrated in Rajastan wherein a community kitchen cooks large quantities of food using solar energy.

2) is easily available. street lights are now solar panels in some highways. If the same tech can be provided to villages that would be great. I know this is possible, since I have solar garden lights, during daytime they store the energy and operate for about 4-6 hrs in the night. All unattended with little to no maintenance, invariably covered with dust and water from the sprinkler.

3) is highly possible since these are low hp motors pumping water from some irrigation canal or well. During day time they can operate flawlessly. No need for govt to subsidize power, instead they can give farmers loans/grants for installing solar water pumps.

I am sure there are more such applications. Feel free to provide more examples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It’s a challenge: Farooq Abdullah

On Day One of taking over the Ministry for New and Renewable Energy, the former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir and chief of the National Conference, Dr Farooq Abdullah, brushed aside the perception that he was miffed with the choice of ministry allocated to him.

This ministry is a big challenge and I take this challenge head on. I am happy that I have been entrusted with the job which ultimately benefits our future generation,” he said, adding that “no profile is big or small. It is just a perception of people…This portfolio is bigger than me.”

Mr Abdullah said that his first priority would be to create awareness about the ministry. “I will go to each and every state and tell them what this ministry is all about and what help we can offer to promote non-conventional energy sources,” he said. The 72- year old minister said he would strive to harness solar energy and tap the vast potential of wind energy, particularly along the country’s coastline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tata Power to generate 5 MW from geothermal, solar plants in Gujarat

Gandhinagar, June 3 Tata Power Company Ltd plans to produce 5 MW of power, each from geothermal and solar power plants in Gujarat, with an investment of Rs 200 crore. It is exploring various options in this regard.

Strengthening its renewable energy portfolio, the company had signed a memorandum of understanding with the Gujarat Government during the Vibrant Gujarat Global Investors’ Summit (VGGIS), in January, to explore the possibility of setting up a 5-MW geothermal power plant in phase one at a suitable location in the State.

Similarly, the company had also signed another MoU for developing a 5-MW solar photo-voltaic (PV) power plant. Tata Power had proposed investments of Rs 100 crore in solar as well as geothermal projects.

These MoUs were part of the Rs 1.10 lakh crore worth of investments promised during the event for renewable power sources.

A company spokesperson told Business Line from Mumbai that post the agreements (MoUs), various options are being explored. Tata Power would be producing 25 per cent of its electricity from renewable, carbon-neutral sources by 2017. With an installed capacity of 2,300 MW, it currently produces about 16 per cent of electricity from green energy sources such as hydro and wind power. Geothermal energy is the natural heat found within the earth, where temperature increases with depth, typically by 10-50 degree Celsius/km.

In Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology, heat is extracted from granites located at a depth of more than 4,000 metres by circulating water through them in an engineered artificial reservoir. The heated water returns to the surface under pressure and is converted into electricity via a heat exchanger and conventional geothermal power plant.

Tata Power’s presence in solar includes Tata BP Solar India Ltd, which is a joint venture with BP Solar, one of the largest solar companies in the world.

Tata BP Solar is a market leader in solar PV technology in India with a turnover of Rs 660 crore. Nearly 75 per cent of its sales come from exports largely to Europe and the U.S. Its growth plans include expansion of its module manufacturing facility and thrust on domestic sales.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One of the simple ways of tapping solar happens to be solar - thermal power plants. PG&E in California has signed up with BrightSource Energy for a 500 MW solar-thermal plant. Fields of mirrors at the plant will focus sunlight on centralized towers, boiling water within the towers, creating steam and turning turbines.

Closer to home:

CHENNAI: Udangudi in Tuticorin district may be the site for a 100-megawatt solar thermal power plant. This was mooted during a meeting between Union Minister for New and Renewable Energy Farooq Abdullah and Electricity Minister Arcot N. Veeraswami here on Saturday 2009/06/21.

I think a better idea would be smaller plants e.g.

A 2MW municipal solar power plant requires about 10 acres of land to serve a city of 1,000 homes — that’s acreage generally easily available at the outskirts of any city of such size in even the most developed countries. With a solar power plant in each of several hundred cities, a Gigawatt of power is delivered locally to where it is needed, in a digestible size.

By feeding power directly into the (local, medium-voltage) distribution grid, they avoid the (long-haul, high-voltage) transmission grid which is expensive to build and expand, and also avoid the expense of a substation for down-transforming transmission voltage to municipal voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Green diesel through green technology

New Delhi (PTI): A new process that converts algae and other biomass into liquid fuels with the help of a catalyst can brighten the prospect of substitute fuel production in the country.

"The technology is a process for converting algae and other biomass into liquid fuels similar to petroleum diesel which is better than the bio-diesels in quality and characteristics. The technology is a pyro-catalysis process," said T Raghavendra Rao, director of Sustainable Technologies and Environmental Projects (STEPS).

"Originally the hydrocarbon oils have been formed over a few million years from algae under the layers of the earth. Now, we are attempting to replicate the natural process using a catalytic process in a much quicker way," Mr. Rao told PTI.

The innovation was recently conferred the gold medal at the Innovators' Award established by aerospace giant Lockheed Martin Corporation under its India innovation growth programme.

The new process, according to Mr. Rao, is not cumbersome as the conventional one besides it yields more fuel that before.

In this method the algae is vapourized in a particular temperature, which is then passed through a catalyst conversion chamber, putting them into a molecular structure that is similar to hydrocarbon fuels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
According to Wikipedia, the ~10GW of Wind Energy in India represents 3% of the total electricity output. That will put the total at over 300 GW. Not saying that Wiki has accurate #s.
I think Wiki may be right. Wind energy is intermittent, installed capacity could be 10GW and it is safe to assume that efficiency is < 50% which would compute to ~150GW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
BTW, there is renewable energy conference hosted by Indian Govt in August, 2009 clicky
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
at a minimum of 10% growth...we will be at 400 GW by 2020...
I think this linear expansion of power is a wrong assumption. The world has to think in terms of reducing per capita power consumption. Excessive use of power needs to be rethought. Already, modern buildings are converting to LEED goals with the idea of reducing power consumption. LED lights can drastically cut down incandescent light bulb power consumed in households. Efficient strategies for energy conservation includes better insulation, design for ambient light, use of alternate energy sources (including solar) at the unit level and all of these strategies goes towards reducing central monolithic power. Low power should be the norm for the entire spectrum of modern appliances too. Dishwashers, washing machines, microwaves, refrigerators, electric appliances all require an overhaul in terms of power consumption. If man can live frugally we can solve most of the daunting issues that confront modern mankind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Yes, very sad state of affairs in the Budget 2009. The giveaways are galloping at an alarming rate. NREGA (which is corruption for the politicians / babus) is now at Rs 39, 000 crores up from 14,000 crores. Mind bogling to say the least. The Govt is down a path of appeasement. Instead if they had a rebate program on CFLs (compact fluorescent) or LED bulbs that would have saved tons of energy consumption in households. I have noticed in places other than Bluru very little usage of Solar for water heating. I don't know about others but I still prefer a hot shower. Solar heating is the best solution for India. Commercial establishment like hotels/motels/restaurants should install solar water heating. New buildings/commercial buildings should have provisions made at build time to install solar water heaters. The Govt can make a great start by converting its own buildings into energy efficient sustainable units. They can be retrofitted with CFLs/LEDs and/or like I have in my home a Solar Light Tube for daylight lighting. Solar water heaters are ubiquitous and needed in Govt buildings for hot water supply. The govt should have incentives for each state in the union to get 1000 MW on average of renewable energy in the next 2-3yrs. The goal is easily achievable if each district in state targets at least 10 MW of power. This would have instantly added 30,000 MW of power to the grid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
^^
Where does it say it is one gigantic plant. The 3000 MW can be for the whole state of Gujarat and they could be 30MW x 100 such plants in various places. I would not rule out our desi dorky media to misquote numbers. India's solar potential is quite high and if say each state in the Union targets on average 1000 MW we would have 30,000MW of Solar power. Small units are the way to go, maybe each district/taluk can have 10MW goal, construct the solar plant on unused/un-arable land. The key is to have good grid connectivity. This is a major issue. Most of the Wind Turbine farms have paltry grid connectivity which is a total loss in terms of energy generated.

The Indian Govt needs to think big and come up with an action plan to increase Solar Energy Power. Instead of having a state to come up with finance, they should talk to World Bank/JBIC/etc for a one big low cost loan and dole them to the states. Each state would have a specific target for Solar Power Generation. Wherever possible economies of scale should be applied, i.e. the center could dictate what the bulk buying price for solar panels are. Apply any good lessons/savings/short cuts learned across all states. Renewable energy is a strategic imperative.
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
An unlikely reason why solar energy conversion makes sense, the people of Belgaum, Karnataka installed solar to beat the power cuts from K Govt Power Supply. Now, if only the rest of the nation can follow this path (Solar Energy) and avoid Govt supplied unreliable power...

Solar energy powers remote branches of Karnataka Vikas Grameen Bank

Ingali, a remote village in Belgaum district of Karnataka, is financially included and connected to the grid power supply. But the problem is the lack of quality power, thus affecting the day-to-day activities of the villagers, including their banking operations.

Till two months ago, erratic power supply often caused trouble for customers of Karnataka Vikas Grameen Bank (KVGB) — a regional rural bank sponsored by Syndicate Bank — in the village. They were at the mercy of grid power.

But now, the sun has come to their rescue. The branch is running its day-to-day operations with the help of solar power units. Operations at nearly 10 per cent of the branch network of the Dharwad-headquartered bank are now being done with the help of solar energy. Mr K.P. Muralidharan, Chairman of KVGB, told Business Line that the bank, which has 424 branches, has implemented solar power packs in 44 remote branches in rural areas.

Erratic supply

Several rural branches were facing acute power problem due to erratic grid supply. Even if the power supply was present, the batteries of the back-up system were not getting the required voltage for charging. Under such circumstances it was difficult to run the branch operations, especially computers. Last fiscal, the bank had installed solar power packs in 10 branches. After seeing its success, the packs were installed in 34 more branches during the current fiscal.

KVGB, which has jurisdiction over nine districts in Karnataka, has implemented solar power units in 20 branches in Belgaum, 17 in Bijapur, six in Dharwad and one in Haveri district. The power shortage was severe in the remote villages of these areas.

He said that Rs 4.5 lakh has been spent on implementing solar power packs in each branch. The Chairman said the bank has not faced any problem with the solar power packs during rainy season. The photo-voltaic cells in the unit can absorb sunlight and the battery can be charged.

Mr Ullas Gunuga, an official in the bank, said that each of these branches has saved around 200 units of grid power a month after installation of the solar power units. This amounts to savings of almost 9,000 units a month by the bank.

Terming it as a successful project, Mr Muralidharan said the bank has proposed to cover nearly 60 branches during the next financial year.

Mr B.G. Patole, Ingali branch manager of KVGB, said his branch has been able to give better quality service to the customers now. The erratic power supply was causing great inconvenience to customers, as the backup power was not sufficient during peak hours. Now the entire branch operations are being run on solar power, he added.
 

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Discussion Starter · #232 ·
Solar power scheme draws Rs 2.29-lakh cr proposals

India's Special Incentive Package Scheme (SIPS), aimed at galvanising investments in semiconductor fabs, ecosystem units and solar PV projects, has attracted 26 proposals, together worth more than Rs 2,29,000 crore.

The ambitious scheme — the Government's endeavour to position India in the league of global hi-tech manufacturing destinations — closed on March 31, 2010, three years after it was flagged off by the Centre. With the SIPS counter now closed, no new applications will be accepted by the Department of IT (DIT) under the scheme, although the processing of existing applications will continue.

This assumes significance considering that India expects to rely on renewable energy to reduce its emission intensity by 2020. The Government recently launched a National Solar Mission that aims to feed 20,000 MW to the national grid by 2022.
 

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Discussion Starter · #234 · (Edited)
Here is a great idea for a backyard wind powered energy generator...


clicky
BONNY DOON — Inventor JoeBen Bevirt made millions off his Gorillapod, a bubbly, bendable camera tripod that began as a Stanford University class project.

But it was his trips to the Chinese factory where Gorillapods are made — and witnessing the gray haze made by China's coal-fired power plants — that inspired Bevirt's latest ambition: find a way to make cheap, clean energy that can be reproduced around the world.

"Gorillapod was really successful and I thought, 'Wow, what do I do to give back?'" said Bevirt, 36, who will be a speaker at Wednesday's What's Next Lecture, "Innovations in Energy: New Sources, Crucial Savings, and How We'll Finance It."

So on his 40-acre ranch in the hills of Bonny Doon, Bevirt and his Joby Energy Inc. employ about 30 Stanford and Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers to design, craft and fly "airborne wind turbines" that harness the power of high-elevation breezes and turn them into power.

"These are just big kites," Bevirt said. Ultimately they will collect energy to send down their tethers and onto the power grid.

Under the redwoods and along the edge of the 2008 Martin Fire, workers with Joby Energy Inc. are creating 40-foot carbon and fiberglass planks to be connected in a 240-foot series of rectangles. At each corner will be a carbon fiber propeller 12 feet in diameter, and the entire contraption will be attached to a power-transferring tether as long as 2,000 feet.

Once the turbines are in the air, a computer system in the center will relay wind information coming in to the propellers and move the contraption to its optimum wind-harnessing path. Ideally, each turbine will produce enough electricity to power 2,000 to 3,000 homes.

In a field across from Joby Energy's main office, staffers test the center console on a remote-controlled mini turbine named Mercury 7. About 10 times a day, it circles the tree tops with a buzzing sound.

Meanwhile, an organic garden and house chef keep employees well-fed as they put in long hours. Cases of Sierra Nevada and Pyramid beer rest on the main office floor, and employees' dogs mingle among the desks.

Bevirt, who was born and raised in Swanton, is no stranger to creativity. His father, Ronald Bevirt, was a member of the Merry Pranksters, known for their acid-dropping experiments, communal residence at author Ken Kesey's La Honda home and Magic Bus drive across the country in the 1960s. The older Bevirt also owned the former Hip Pocket bookstore on Pacific Avenue, where he was arrested in 1965 on obscenity charges after hanging artsy photographs of male genitalia in store windows.

Bevirt was named after a character in Kesey's 1964 novel "Sometimes a Great Notion."

The first airborne turbines should produce power for the grid in 2012 or 2013, Bevirt said, in a pilot project possibly in the Midwest. The flat land and brisk breezes there create prime test conditions, he said.
These kinds of simple innovative ideas should be feasible for Indian Entrepreneurs. Carbon-carbon materials are used in the LCA aircraft project. IITs, NITs and other colleges can come up with simple stuff like the above and create a wind generator for powering 2000-3000 homes. Each village in India could use one of these contraptions. Power for everyone at renewable energy terms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #272 ·
IREDA to shortlist developers for 100-MW solar energy plants soon

HYDERABAD: Solar power generation in the country will take a quantum leap soon with Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA) likely to shortlist developers (independent power producers) for 100-MW of generation by August-end. Selected developers are likely to install their solar photovoltaic plants and start tapping solar energy by the current financial year-end, if National Solar Mission's progress was on schedule, speakers at an interactive panel discussion on “Investing in building solar project in India – Opportunities and challenges” said here on Wednesday.

Organised as a prelude to “SOLARCON India 2010”, to be held here from July 28 to 30, several entrepreneurs participated in the discussion. “There is a tremendous response to expression of interest on setting up solar PV plants from every State,” chairman of Solar Energy Manufacturers Association of India N. Uttam Kumar Reddy said.

In response to expression of interest from budding developers for 20-MW from every State, applications were received for above 200-MW, he explained. It was being planned to develop plants for 1,100-MW in the first phase of the mission to have 20,000-MW installed capacity by 2022.

President and CEO of Solar Semiconductor Ltd stated that that a draw of lots would decide developers for 20 MW from the State, out of 450 applications received. However, it was not known how much share every State would get from the initial plans of 100-MW capacity by the year-end.

CEO of Photon Energy Systems Limited Gautham Nalamada said present installed capacity was about 10-MW in the country. The installation cost of solar PV units was about Rs. 15 crore per MW against Rs. 5 crore for thermal power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #372 · (Edited)
Couple of ideas to consider in India...

The sun heats up the air underneath a huge translucent, sloping canopy around the tower that is about as wide as a football field. The air is heated to about 194 degrees Fahrenheit (90 degrees Celsius) and then it flows into the tower, spins the turbines and rises. The higher the tower, the stronger the flow of air. The faster the turbines spin, the more electricity possible. After sundown, the ground continues to release heat and more electricity would be generated.

The technology has been proved by a smaller version that worked for seven years on the plains of Spain. It created 50 kilowatts of electricity per day, according to the German builders Schlaich, Bergermann and Partner.

From CNN..

http://www.cnn.com/2011/10/02/tech/innovation/solar-tower-arizona/index.html

You don't have to be a science major to know that heat rises: Just step into an attic on a hot summer day. But what you might not know is that this basic scientific reality could also help create clean energy for entire cities.

For centuries, architects have taken advantage of rising heat to help cool some structures. Solar chimneys allow the rising air to go out of the building, taking the heat with it.

Today, Australian entrepreneur Roger Davey wants to take advantage of that phenomenon -- with a twist.

He wants to create, capture and control hot air to help power cities. He plans to build a huge solar updraft tower, 2,600 feet tall, in the Arizona desert. As the hot air moves into the tower, it would turn 32 turbines, spinning them fast enough to create mechanical energy, which generators convert to electricity.

His company, EnviroMission, says such a tower can create up to 200 megawatts of power per day, enough to power 100,000 homes. He says they don't intend to put coal or nuclear or alternative power out of business, but want to be a strong, no-carbon emission supplementary source.
This is from MIT, USA
http://techcrunch.com/2011/09/30/more-details-on-mits-artificial-leaf-and-video/

Back in March, we heard about a breakthrough from MIT: an “artificial leaf” that produces pure oxygen and hydrogen gas, powered entirely by sunlight...
 

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Discussion Starter · #376 ·
Gujarat is leading the way! If all the other states in the union follow the same path as Gujarat, then India would have 30 x 1000 MW of Solar power in the next 2-3yrs. That would be awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #411 ·
The massive drop in solar panel prices, is making Solar energy on par with conventional energy.
The Govt needs to come up with policies that provide the spur to the industry. These plans are required going forward.

1. Mandate that all residential new buildings install solar water heater and solar power panels on rooftops. This should be applicable for cities, towns and small cities.
2. Mandate all commercial buildings to install solar water heater and solar power panels.
3. Convert all Govt, Public buildings with the solar water heater/solar power.
4. All small, medium, large corporations immediately install solar water/solar power.

Going forward, penalize excessive power users who don't convert. On the other hand offer incentives to convert to solar power similar to green house gas model. The companies/entities could draw from other suppliers of solar power in their locality. This provides an exchange system and they pay for upfront costs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #431 ·
Another advantage of the project is that power generated will be supplied to villages alongside the canal, which will lead to lower transmission losses.
Using the above concept, India needs to install at least 1MW of Solar power generation plant per village. The changes that this can usher into rural areas is immense. Instead of wasting money on the boondoggle NREGA program they can divert such money as investment into Solar power for a village. Thousands of villages self sufficient in power during day time would transform the livelihoods of rural folks.
 
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