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I think it would be unfair not to dedicate some space to the Triangle area, outside Raleigh. Growth does not happen only in the City of Oaks, but also in places like Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary, RDU Airport, etc. I would like to start a thread that will include all those nice projects that take place outside Raleigh. Naturally, I will keep updating this original post to include entries not mentioned initially. Please feel free to mention projects worthy of making the list ;)



DURHAM
  • American Tobacco Complex (office/retail/entertainment)
  • West Village, Phase II (mixed-use)
  • The Renaissance at Durham Centre (17 floors; residential)
  • Former Woolworth site (Parrish Street; ~14-17 floors; offices/museum)
  • Hock Tower II (~11 floors)
  • Triangle Biotechnology Center at Venable (urban research facilities/offices)
  • Durham Transportation Center
  • Durham Central Park (park)

CARY
  • Alston Activity Center (mixed-use)
  • Stone Creek Village/Sears Farm (mixed-use)
  • Regency Park (10-story office tower)
  • The Arboretum (mixed-use)
  • The Residences & Shoppes At Matthews Place (mixed-use)

CHAPEL HILL
  • Lot 5
  • Wallace Deck
  • Franklin Hotel (hospitality)
  • Rosemary Village
  • Carolina North (mixed-use)

CARRBORO
  • 300 East Main (mixed-use redevelopment)

APEX
  • Villages at Beaver Creek (mixed-use)

MORRISVILLE
  • Carpenter Village (mixed-use)

PITTSBORO
  • Briar Chapel (mixed-use)

RTP
  • Davis Park/Triangle Metro Center (mixed-use)

RDU
  • New Terminal C
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
RDU and Durham updates.

RDU:
Let me begin with a couple of links to the New Terminal C, for RDU Airport. Not an urban project, of course, but the significance of it is hard to ignore. There are video clips for your viewing pleasure:

Construction on new Terminal C at RDU underway (Source: News 14 Carolina)

Construction For Terminal C Under Way At RDU International (Source: WRAL-5)

DURHAM:
Sounds like a series of great redevelopment opportunities are under way for DT Durham. In today's N&O there is an article, titled Quietly rehabbing Durham. This is a great effort to bring more life to Durham's core and the developer's work should be applauded. DT Durham has a lot of older/historic structures that deserve to be preserved, and I think that the City of Durham has done a good job focusing on historic preservation. Not everything can be saved, but the City of Medicine seems to maintain a nice collection of buildings from the yester-years.Please notice the last sentence in the following excerpt... I wonder if this is a new vision, or it is the Parrish Street tower I mentioned on the list.
Greenfire has quietly spent at least $7.25 million collecting 15 downtown buildings -- mostly older, three-story properties averaging about 25,000 square feet -- for renovation or redevelopment. The company plans to spend as much as $150 million on renovation and new-construction projects by 2012. Its latest acquisitions could be the subject of negotiations to build an office tower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, that is the 4-star hotel, called The Umstead, they are building. The reason why I didn't include it is because of its nature... too suburban to make a difference. It is a great project, but it sits on the wrong spot :( The Arboretum, however, has a semi-urban appearance and functionality, similar to North Hills, which is why I included it. Also, the 10-story mid-rise for the 1111 Regency Pky is nothing more than an office park addition, but at 10 stories it makes a huge difference ;) I have renderings for most of these projects and I will share them here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
DT Durham - Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co redevelopment update.

Good news from Durham, which continues to lead in the area or redevelopment and historic preservation: City to aid Liggett renovation. This is a HUGE project and partially explains why developers are reluctant to build new high-rises in DT Durham. With so much square footage and condos poured into the market, it would be hard(er) to propose new towers. Nevertheless, the urban experience of DT Durham will be hard to match - let alone ignore - once these projects/redevelopments are done, some time between 2008 and 2010.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DT Cary - The Residences & Shoppes At Matthews Place.

Cary is not known for its urban developments, let alone for its [small] downtown area. The latter, however, isn't as bad as one may imagine. For the last few years we've been hearing about small urban projects coming, but nothing concrete. Here is one of those proposals that is actually going to be delivered: The Residences & Shoppes At Matthews Place. The rendering below is taken from the project's web site:



The building will be built near the street, in an urban form, but the entire site will not quite offer a true urban feel. It is a good start and I surely hope to see more such projects for DT Cary.
 

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Dont know if this qualifies as urban but, These very small apartment buildings will be within walking distance to whatever they want.


A Raleigh real estate firm said Tuesday that it has started construction on a 332-unit apartment complex in Knightdale.

Carolina Communities Development Group broke ground Tuesday on Greystone at Widewaters, among the first apartment complexes in Knightdale. Greystone's first building is scheduled to open in June.

The development will contain units ranging in size from 900 to 1,200 square feet and rents varying from $900 to $1,200 per month.

The development represents the most recent addition to Knightdale's Widewaters Village area, which also includes a shopping center and subdivision.

Carolina Communities officials cite the completion of the U.S. 64 Bypass for a recent increase in residential and commercial real estate development in the Knightdale area.

Carolina Communities is also developing the Charleston Commons at Alexander Place development in north Raleigh, Creekside Valley in Apex and Olde Towne in southwest Raleigh.
 

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Knightdales Urban Vision

KNIGHTDALE'S PLANNING GOALS: Encourage the creation of urban centers where residential and commercial buildings are within walking distance of one another.

Improve the overall quality and variety of residential housing.

Establish consistent building and architecture guidelines for both residential and commercial buildings.



David Bracken, Staff Writer
The Knightdale of the future is an urban utopia where homes run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, sidewalks are ubiquitous and pedestrians are freed from reliance on the automobile.
Following in the footsteps of Cary, Knightdale recently adopted more stringent building and architectural standards -- and also made it known that developers should be catering to the carriage trade by building pricey homes. The town, which plans to create urban centers of mixed commerce and housing, hopes to become Wake County's next destination for people with expensive tastes.

The Knightdale of the future is described -- in exhaustive detail -- in a recently adopted 286-page document sprinkled with photographs, diagrams and charts.

"This is very cutting-edge," said Mike Frangos, the town's planning director.

The plan, which is the result of two years of study, has essentially rewritten the playbook for developers wanting to build in town.

"The problem was, we had a vision for Knightdale that wasn't spelled out," explained Town Councilman Russell Killen.

Mobile and metal structures are now prohibited, and an increased emphasis has been put on the compatibility of building styles, signs, lighting and landscaping.

Parts of the town have been rezoned to encourage the building of pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods along the lines of Carpenter Village in Cary and Meadowmont of Chapel Hill. The developments offer a variety of upscale housing and are within walking distance of boutique shops and other amenities.

The overall vision in Knightdale's new planning ordinance represents a radical departure for the town.

"They're certainly pushing the limit to a great extent," said Marcus Jackson, a senior vice president with Carter, a developer that represents a Knightdale landowner.

In recent decades, development in Knightdale, which has a population of about 7,300, has been characterized by nondescript commercial buildings and cookie-cutter subdivisions.

The new Knightdale is trying to shed its reputation of affordability.

The Town Council passed a resolution last year as guidance for town planners saying that new single-family homes should have a minimum value of 85 percent of the average sale price reported by Wake County for the previous year. That turned out to be $185,000 for 2004, well above Knightdale's average housing price of $161,000.

Killen said the resolution's intent is to inform developers of the kind of new homes Town Council favors. He said the council is not able to reject a developer's proposal solely based on cost.

Knightdale officials say their document is forward-thinking and realistic.

The opening of the U.S. 64/264 Knightdale Bypass last year and the eventual arrival of the Interstate 540 extension have made Knightdale popular with developers and commuters.

The bypass has made subdivisions in Knightdale some of the easiest to reach from downtown Raleigh. The extension of I-540 will make commuting from Knightdale to Research Triangle Park similar to the commute from growing Wake towns such as Holly Springs.

Mike Hunter, a partner with W&W Partners, said the quality and price of housing in Knightdale is rising. Homes in his company's Princeton Manor subdivision along Hodge Road have been selling for more than anticipated, he said. He said much of the town's plan is attainable.

Hunter's company was also responsible for sections of Carpenter Village in Cary. He said W&W is planning a development near the eastern end of Knightdale that will mix residential and commercial in a similar manner.

While Frangos said Knightdale is not trying to become the Cary of eastern Wake, Cary was the first Wake town to adopt strict planning regulations that focused on design.

Glenda Toppe, a private planner who was Cary's planning director from 1985 to 1996, said Cary benefited from adopting its regulations in the 1970s before most development occurred. "They didn't have a lot of clutter," she said.

Knightdale is not operating with a clean slate, which could complicate redevelopment.

While land near the bypass and I-540 may be ripe for upscale projects, other areas of Knightdale could be years from drawing interest from developers who will build to the town's specifications.

Billy Wilder, a former Knightdale mayor, said redeveloping the old downtown is likely to be particularly slow. Knightdale's new plan classifies the old downtown as the "Town Center District," a place for multi-story buildings and high-density residential housing.

Today, much of Knightdale's downtown lacks sidewalks, and the area draws a crowd just once a year for the Christmas parade.

Wilder, who recently sold 85 acres in Knightdale to a developer, said pedestrian-friendly villages are great, but people must be willing to pay.

"I'm not opposed to the concept," he said. "I think it's going to be a while before this town will be ready for it."
 

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for those not familiar with the area.
We got a host of bix box stores and chains going in now.


Ive seen alot of industrial development in the area outlined in green, A huge budweiser distributor, scholastic, dillon and other companies are established recently in the area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wilder, who recently sold 85 acres in Knightdale to a developer, said pedestrian-friendly villages are great, but people must be willing to pay.

"I'm not opposed to the concept," he said. "I think it's going to be a while before this town will be ready for it."
I think this sums up the attitude of the land-owners and developers who are looking for quick bucks... Why in the Earth should the people pay for something simple that makes sense? Well designed communities are more desirable, allow for additional density - profits for developers & builders - and offer great alternatives to home buyers. Any of those smart-ass developers ever thought why people pay top dollars for smaller houses in Boylan Heights and Oakwood? It is not because they want to live near their jobs - that is a myth - but due to the unique feel of those neighborhoods. People want to be treated like individuals, not like a mass. People ARE ready, they just don't have the options.

By the way, thanks for the additional information. I hope to see Knightdale moving to the right direction and apply better urban guidelines in the future. If developers and town officials know what's right, they'd better start making changes now, not wait for future "demand". If you (emutiny) find more [specific] info on these proposals/plans, please share them and I will place them on the list.
 

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Carolina Communities is developing the apartment community, its second major development in the Triangle area.

"It's a great opportunity to be able to bring this kind of property to Knightdale," said Scott McCrary, president of Carolina Communities. "The completion of Highway 64 Bypass makes Greystone at Widewaters an excellent choice of residence for anyone working in the Raleigh or Zebulon, N.C., areas, and Knightdale's new retail developments."

Greystone at Widewaters will consist of 16 apartment buildings, a clubhouse with a pool and fitness facility, which is scheduled to open in June. "The clubhouse is going to be one of the biggest attractions for Greystone residents" McCrary said. "It will include a stone fireplace and flat-screen TV with a sound system." According to McCrary, there will also be WIFI Internet access in the clubhouse and pool area, and the community will be constructing an onsite car wash facility.

According to McCrary, there are many features that are not found in most apartment communities. "We've focused on making day-to-day activities as convenient as possible at Greystone, while mixing in high-end amenities," said McCrary. "There will be a dry cleaning service, outdoor grilling areas and walking trails."



The shopping center is called widewater commons, its infront of where the apartments are being built, theres a lowes foods, many fast foods, quiznos, home depot, i could go on and on. Theres talks of a movie theatre and a best buy coming to knightdale as well.



ABOUT CAROLINA COMMUNITIES:
Carolina Communities Development Group (CCDG) is a fully integrated real estate development firm specializing in the acquisition and development of both commercial and residential properties. Carolina Communities is actively serving both the North Carolina and South Carolina marketplace and is currently developing Charleston Commons at Alexander Place in North Raleigh, Creekside Valley in Apex, Olde Towne in Southeast Raleigh and Widewaters Village in Knightdale. Its mission is to identify, acquire and develop properties that will provide end-users quality business and residential environments while returning its investors an optimum combination of high returns with minimal risk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On Carolina Communities and DT Durham.

StevenW said:
Doesn't anyone update the Winston Salem area? :?
Somebody should ;) Since I do not live there, and I am having a hard time even updating my web site, I am not able to undertake such a task. It will be nice if someone did start such thread. At least something that will cover the entire Triad's major projects - then it can be expanded, or broken down by cities.

Now, let's look at the Carolina Communities development company. First of all, here is their website: http://www.ccdevgrp.com. One of their ongoing projects is Charleston Common at Alexander Place, which is an anomaly because it is a decent cluster of affordable housing, in a semi-urban setting. In fact, the homes face the main street (ACC Blvd) and sidewalks exist on both sides. Also, I must say it is a densely built community within a VERY short walk from the stores (the latter is a huge suburban mess, but this is not the place to discuss it). Here is the site plan:



Phase I and II are under way (I am planning on sharing some photos with y'all, but under the proper thread). Now, don't picture anything extraordinary because you will be disappointed. The whole "Charleston homes" angle is exaggerated, but the layout of this site is a great step forward towards creating urban areas outside downtown. I know I sort-of deviated from the outside-Raleigh scope of this thread, but the above project is the only example I can use at this time to show Carolina Communities' work. If their plan for Knightdale is similar, then I am sure we'll see a nice urban community develop in that town.

Back to Durham, with a piece of good news in an article posted at N&O today titled New development team in Durham. While there is nothing new announced, there is some light shed on the former Woolworth site proposal, and I share an excerpt:
The Durham City Council voted in June to sell the Woolworth site to Webb and his development group to build a $9 million office tower. Early renderings showed the building as being of a similar scale to the 17-story SunTrust tower across the street. If built, it would be the first high-rise building constructed in downtown since the 14-story Durham Centre was built about 20 years ago.

The tower would house ground-floor stores and a city-funded museum dedicated to the history of Parrish Street -- nicknamed "the black Wall Street" for the black-owned businesses that thrived there in the early 20th century.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The good news from the Triangle continue!!! Between today's N&O and this week's Triangle Business Journal, I can offer you a lot of material.

DURHAM:
* Rethinking Durham's 'Pickle' - Looks like someone has the right idea. Sounds like a solid development around Durham's tallest tower.

* From Baltimore to the Bull City - A nice interview with Bill Struever.

* The pitch: $11M overhaul for Durham Athletic Park - More on revitalization plans in DT Durham.

CHAPEL HILL:
* Face of Chapel Hill changing with new developments - Nice little overview of the latest developments in Chapel Hill, particularly downtown.

WAKE FOREST:
* Wake Forest works to boost tourism, population in core - Anyone who discounts Wake Forest when it comes to urban renewal hasn't been there yet. While small, DT Wake Forest is pleasant and inviting... and it is about to get even more inviting.

RDU:
* Report sees need for third runway at RDU - A third runway is under consideration. Let's not underestimate RDU anymore ;)

The growth in the Triangle is not limited to Raleigh, as I am sure you can see by the great news coming from all directions. I wish I had the time and energy to show the big picture, but quite frankly it will be impossible to do so. I have a few surprises up my sleeve for y'all, so stay tuned. It may take time, but it is worth it.
 

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I drive by the Charleston Homes daily. My wife and I stopped into the model when it was finally opened. I was told that Phases I & II had sold out, and the salesman expected the remaining phases to sell out the day they were opened up to sales.

I wouldn't by any one of these (don't like walmart enough to live in their parking lot), but there is clearly a need/desire for people to want to walk/live near shopping. All I'm hoping is Brier Creek 'Village' does something along these lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I can't wait to see what will be announced for the final plan on Brier Creek Village Center. The surrounding developments are not exactly encouraging, so the developer has ONLY one chance to do this right. I have taken a few photos from the existing condition and the surroundings, so stay tuned. As for the "WalMart" parking deck project, you said it right. To the developer's credit, they plan on putting a tree buffer, blocking Kohl's, WalMart, etc. I would like to believe that in the future we'll see some new developments replacing the parking lots.
 

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It would be nice if some midrise towers could be built around University Tower, unfortunately I'm not sure how tall the buildings could get due to Durham's strict height restrictions outside of it's core. I think a few nice 5-10 story buildings would really help that immediate area out,unfortunately I think building heights are limited to 4 or 5 floors....meaning what's built out there will probably sppear to be suburban in nature. Maybe they can still create a dense area around the tower, just with short buildings....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I agree with you, but even 4-5 story low-rises can add to the area, if placed in an urban manner... which is possible. University Tower may stand out, still, but from the ground level it won't be as bad, I think. We can still hope.

Here is some additional information regarding the Arboretum, in Cary. The following is taken from the developer's website (image is courtesy of Crosland):
The Residences at the Arboretum



The Residences at the Arboretum will offer 207 condominiums and townhomes. These one, two and three bedroom units will range in size from 725 square feet up to 1,450 square feet in both one and two-storyThe Residences at the Arboretum, Cary Condos layouts. They will feature luxury finishes with 9’ ceilings, crown molding, hardwoods, granite countertops, oversized balconies, and double wall and floor sound insulation.

Adjacent to the shops at The Arboretum, residents will be able to dine at great restaurants such as Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Bonefish Grill, Starbucks, Moe’s, and others. They can also lengthen their workout at O2 Fitness by walking to it!

Accessibility is always a concern, but Arboretum residents will enjoy this location less than a mile from Interstate 40 and can pull right into their private resident parking in a secured parking deck. We will offer state of the art controlled building access with elevator access to all floors with interior corridors. Finally, the Residences at the Arboretum will offer private resident courtyards with swimming pool, fountains, grill areas, gardens, and gazebos.
 

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Right after I got back from MA the other week I had an itch for Starbucks, the closest of which happens to be in the Arboretum. I've lived up the street from it for a few years now but have never actually driven around the complex and was pretty impressed, it reminded me of a mini Brier Creek. Of course my car stood out like a sore thumb as it was surrounded by Mercedes, BMW's and the like (the pollen didn't help matters lol)
 
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