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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since there isn't a thread or discussion on heritage conservation in Malaysia, I decided to start one here.

So without further ado:


Heritage conservation of the tomb of Dato Koyah, Penang

Though his real name was Syed Mustapha Idris, Dato Koyah was a Muslim saint who travelled to Penang from the Malabar coast of India during the early 19th century. Known in his time for producing medicine from tree leaves and building roads overnight, his tomb became a pillar of the local Muslim Malabari community at Penang. However, over 200 years of renovations and urbanization took it's toll on the building, leaving it in a sorry state after his death.



The original tomb as it was during the colonial era.




The tomb in more recent years, before conservation.


So a few years ago, conservation work started on restoring the keramat to give it a new lease of life.





And as a result, here's what the shrine looks like now.



Source: https://www.facebook.com/mythinkcity/
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And to fill up the thread with another example, here's a crosspost from the mosque thread.


Masjid Lama Kampung Teluk Memali, Perak

Built in 1910 to replace a surau, the mosque was later abandoned due to multiple floods and community relocation. It wasn't until 2017 that the structure was relocated.

There's a website and galley that documents the relocation and restoration of the mosque. There's also a few videos of it on YouTube.








Photo source: https://www.orangperak.com/kisah-masjid-usang-107-tahun-di-kampung-teluk-memali-perak.html
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And here's one more piece, though it's a bit dated.


Heritage building on Church Street to be turned into Malay Museum

A CATEGORY II heritage building located in the George Town World Heritage Site will be turned into a Malay Museum soon.

The Penang Island City Council has leased out the premises in Jalan Dato Koyah to Pinang Peranakan Mansion Sdn Bhd for 15 years with a 15+15 years option.

Category II is for buildings or sites of special interest that warrant efforts to preserve them.

The council said in a recent statement that the Pinang Peranakan Mansion Sdn Bhd proprietor had to carry out restoration work on the building.

The plot, including its parking space, is 1,648.23sq m (17,742sq ft) in size.

The council also said measuring work on the boundaries was being carried out by the company.

“Any structures to be built and restoration work to be carried out can only begin once the building plan is approved by the council.

“The restoration and idea to turn the building into a Malay Museum will have a positive impact on the World Heritage Site.

“It will also help boost tourism in the area,” the council stated.

The company currently runs the Pinang Peranakan Mansion, a 19th-century house that has been turned into a Baba-Nyonya museum that showcases more than 1,000 pieces of antiques and collectibles.

The museum is located in the heritage site in Church Street.


Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/co...turned-into-malay-museum/#IzyHLsEc8d7oUrEe.99
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gua Tambun closed indefinitely, major clean up on the way



One of the cave drawings. (Photo by DagdaMor)


KUALA LUMPUR (July 13): Ipoh’s Gua Tambun will be closed indefinitely as Ipoh City Council (MBI) goes about the task of cleaning up the historical site.

The Perak authorities must also determine the agency or body that should be responsible for the upkeep of the cave.


State Tourism and Culture Committee chairman Tan Kar Hing told The Malay Mail that MBI has been given seven days to clean up the area.

“I have also asked several departments and agencies to prepare reports on the cave’s future developments,” Tan said.

Those involved are the National Heritage Department, Tourism Perak, Perak State Parks Corporation, MBI and the Mineral and Geoscience Department.

Tan explained that “while the cave is located on a site under the Kinta Land Office’s jurisdiction, it does not have the expertise to maintain it,” but the paintings on the wall’s cave are looked after by the National Heritage Department.

“Hence, we need reports from the various departments and agencies to decide which agency should look after the cave,” The Malay Mail reported Tan saying.

He also said he will inspect the site again next week after the clean-up is done.

Gua Tambun is home to South-east Asia’s largest hematite Neolithic rock art. The cave paintings found there are reputed to be 12,000 years old.

They are thought to be the only such cave art in Malaysia.

It was reported earlier this week that the state temporarily closed off public access to Gua Tambun due to dangerous and poorly-maintained routes to the site.

The two paths to Gua Tambun are reported to be dirty, treacherous and overgrown.

Non-governmental organisations in Perak have also supported the state government’s plan to shut off public access to the cave.


Link: https://www.edgeprop.my/content/1405810/gua-tambun-closed-indefinitely-major-clean-way
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
New museum planned to showcase finds in Bujang Valley, Sungai Batu



Bakthiar says the Kedah Tua site, where Sungai Batu has been recognised as Southeast Asia’s oldest civilization has tremendous tourism potential. (Bernama pic)

GEORGE TOWN: The government is looking to pique world interest in the Bujang Valley and Sungai Batu, collectively known as “Kedah Tua”, by building a new museum showcasing findings there over the years.

Deputy Tourism and Culture Minister Muhammad Bakhtiar Wan Chik said plans were being made for an “archaeotourism” site at Kedah Tua which extends from Lembah Bujang to Sungai Batu up to Penang’s mainland border of Guar Kepah, near Penaga, for international visitors.

He said an agreement would be signed between the government and the Aga Khan Trust, a philanthropic organisation which has been helping Penang restore some of its heritage buildings and sites to undertake this.

Bakthiar said the Kedah Tua site, where Sungai Batu has been recognised as Southeast Asia’s oldest civilization, has tremendous tourism potential.

He said the government was also mindful of unnecessary development, so it would come up with a Special Area Plan for the Bujang Valley site to ensure restriction on development was put in place.

“Our priority right now is to form a museum which will be an information centre so that more can learn about our civilisation,” Bakhtiar said.

He also revealed that the Kedah sultan had a keen interest in Lembah Bujang, and had pledged an undisclosed sum to develop it.

Earlier, Bakhtiar opened the fourth National Archaeology Seminar at a hotel here, organised by Universiti Sains Malaysia and the Northern Corridor Implementation Authority.

In 2016, the Sungai Batu Archaeological Complex was declared as showing the earliest and oldest civilisation in Southeast Asia by Oxford University archaeologist Stephen Oppenheimer and four other experts.

Five archaeological experts, representing five world civilisations, namely Mesopotamia, Indus, Mesoamerica, China and Greek-Rome, signed a declaration plaque declaring Sungai Tua as the region’s oldest civilisation site.

Meanwhile, at the same function, heritage commissioner Zainah Ibrahim detailed the number of archaeological sites in the country. Of a total of 965 sites, 822 were on land and 143 were underwater, she said.

She said only 13 were gazetted as “national heritage sites”, while eight were classified as “heritage sites” under the National Heritage Act 2005.

Zainah said another 149 would be listed soon.

Chiming in, Bakhtiar said Malaysia had four Unesco sites: George Town and Melaka which are jointly awarded sites, the Lenggong Valley, Kinabalu Park and Mulu National Park.

He said four more sites had been identified as possible Unesco sites: the Gombak Selangor Quartz Ridge (formerly Klang Gates Ridge), the Forest Reserve Institute of Malaysia and the Royal Belum Forest.


Source: https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/c...-showcase-finds-in-bujang-valley-sungai-batu/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rejuvenating public spaces with placemaking



Placemaking is a relatively new concept in Malaysia but it is becoming an increasingly integral part of the community and the government is pushing for the concept to be part of urban redevelopment.

Placemaking refers to a way of improving a neighbourhood, city or region, by inspiring people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces and maximise shared value as well as strengthening the connection between people and places.

Among successful placemaking in Kuala Lumpur is Petaling Street, or better known as Chinatown, and in George Town, Penang where the local authorities have reset the function of Armenian Park for recreation, as opposed to being an illegal flea market.

The state reclaimed a forgotten urban space that was once a significant entertainment place for Chinese opera and cinema in Chinatown and decayed and neglected buildings in the city to transform and incorporate with art and cultural strategies.
For more info: https://focusmalaysia.my/property/r...J8R1W90l2s52ZGR5h7RJCa_mtOGgCTqVicbzl5hH3O4vE
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^^ From the article, it seems they have at least Kampung Baru, Pasar Seni, Petaling Street, and the Chin Woo Stadium in their sights. Besides that:

"[...] Other than that there is the Kelab Sultan Sulaiman area, and the whole stretch of Masjid India until International Hotel (in Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz).”
Some places are already undergoing rejuvenation, like the RUANG space by Think City at Lebuh Pasar Besar, and the neighbouring Medan Pasar square.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not exactly a 'flashy' conservation piece, but the following is definitely related to heritage:

17,000 years old artefacts found in Gunung Pulai, Baling





The National Heritage Department has found more than 100 prehistoric Paleolithic artefacts estimated at 17,000 years old in several caves in Gunung Pulai, Baling.

Artefacts in the form of stone tools, fragments of pottery and river snails were found at new sites of excavation including Gua Kelambu, Gua Tembus and Gua Akar in the mountain.

National Heritage Department director-general Mesran Mohd Yusop, who is also Heritage Commissioner, said the artefacts were discovered while his department was conducting explorations in the area between April and October last year.
For more: https://www.malaysiakini.com/news/507948
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
And now, something more recent.

Two more historical cannons unearthed in Penang

GEORGE TOWN: The recent discovery of two more historical cannons along the Esplanade, not far from Fort Cornwallis, could lead to more of such artefacts being unearthed at the site, says the Tourism, Arts and Culture Ministry.

Its Secretary-General Datuk Dr Noor Zari Hamat said archaeologists believed more artefacts could be found in the area.

“The latest discovery of the cannons is an important event in Penang history, ” Noor Zari said after the two cannons were unearthed during the reconstruction and upgrading work on the seawall along the Esplanade, near the City Hall building.

The Bloomfeld cannons weigh about three tonnes each, and measure about 3.6m in length.

They were the fifth and sixth cannons to be discovered on Dec 9 and 27 respectively since restoration work began in the vicinity in 2017.

They were also the largest found to date, compared with four others, with two each unearthed at the west side of the fort on Feb 19,2018, and at the south of the fort on Dec 24,2018.
For more info, dating, background, and future purpose of the cannons, go here: http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news/145934/two-more-historical-cannons-unearthed-in-penang/
 

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