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Would that be with or without HMV?




I guess you're surmising that the HMV building could be a suitable spot for Forever 21?

Certainly, the property has had quite a fascinating history over the years, and while it's perhaps best known as the former Callers (well discussed in these forums before), there is a more recent precedent for it being a fashion flagship - under the shortlived 'New Lewis's' brand.

I did some digging around in the local studies library last year, and came up with the following timeline (there's a lot more detail in the newspaper articles I found, which I hope to share here and/or in a blog in due course):

  • Early 1980s: Callers closed
  • March 1984: Callers building sold to Heron Group (10% of space leased to Dixons)
  • (1985: HMV trading at that time from what is now Superdrug, further down Northumberland Street)
  • February 1985: Opening of The Place announced by Foster Brothers – a “new look fashion superstore” in 90% of the former Callers property
  • 1 May 1985: The Place opened – 40,000 sq ft, four floors, with fashions, café and salon
  • 17 July 1985: Closure of The Place announced following Sears’ acquisition of Foster Brothers
  • August 1985: The Place closed; store refurbishment as part of conversion to Lewis’s trial smaller store format – a fashion and sports shop for men, women and children, including designer names, and also selling perfume, cosmetics, jewellery and accessories. Also a hairdressing salon. 40,000 sq ft over four floors (LG, G, 1, 2). Restaurant on second floor. Lewis’s tenth store at the time (others in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Leicester, Oxford, Blackpool, Hanley).
  • October 1985: The New Lewis’s opened
  • January 1987: The New Lewis’s closure announced
  • February 1987: The New Lewis’s closed
  • 20 February 1987: Lease taken over by Hamleys
  • June 1988: Closure of Hamleys announced; store to become Poundstretcher

Basically, Lewis’s lasted only from October 1985 to February 1987 – but still longer than Hamleys after it, and certainly longer than The Place before it.

I’m yet to find out how long Poundstretcher lasted (assuming that did happen), and when HMV moved in - I guess that's something to discuss further in the retail memories thread!
 

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Discussion Starter · #222 ·
I should have flagged up that Oxford Street's Forever 21 is in a property recently acquired from HMV:

http://www.retail-week.com/property...ns-oxford-street/5019398.article?referrer=RSS

I think HMV basically received an offer for the lease they couldn't refuse - so there is a precedent there!

A little hypothetical, but you have to assume that if another retailer ever took over the present HMV, HMV would still want to have a (smaller) presence in Newcastle city centre. It's interesting to consider where a suitable location might be, given that Newcastle - unlike some other big cities - doesn't have a second, smaller HMV already.

As mentioned recently on the 'Retail Memories' thread, HMV in Newcastle started off as "EMI Records and Tapes" in a much smaller shop on the ground floor of Pearl Assurance House, taking part of the 'Waring & Gillow' space.

While still in the small shop, they changed their name to HMV, as shown on this plan . . .


Northumberland Street Retail - 1978.

This is an interesting historical document, a plan of Northumberland Street showing exactly what shops were in place at 'a frozen moment in time' in 1978.

This plan is in the book "The Ins & Outs of Newcastle upon Tyne", which was produced as a specific guide for disabled access to (mainly) City Centre commercial premises, including Pubs, Restaurants and Shops.

It was very good for what it was produced for at the time (1978) but now 33 years later, it has become a useful historical record of what was around in the City Centre, at that point in time.

This plan shows Northumberland street as it was during those long years (both before and after this particular year) when it was the richest shopping street in the UK (in 'revenue per square foot') after London's Oxford Street.




.
 

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I guess you're surmising that the HMV building could be a suitable spot for Forever 21?

Certainly, the property has had quite a fascinating history over the years, and while it's perhaps best known as the former Callers (well discussed in these forums before), there is a more recent precedent for it being a fashion flagship - under the shortlived 'New Lewis's' brand.

I did some digging around in the local studies library last year, and came up with the following timeline (there's a lot more detail in the newspaper articles I found, which I hope to share here and/or in a blog in due course):

  • Early 1980s: Callers closed
  • March 1984: Callers building sold to Heron Group (10% of space leased to Dixons)
  • (1985: HMV trading at that time from what is now Superdrug, further down Northumberland Street)
  • February 1985: Opening of The Place announced by Foster Brothers – a “new look fashion superstore” in 90% of the former Callers property
  • 1 May 1985: The Place opened – 40,000 sq ft, four floors, with fashions, café and salon
  • 17 July 1985: Closure of The Place announced following Sears’ acquisition of Foster Brothers
  • August 1985: The Place closed; store refurbishment as part of conversion to Lewis’s trial smaller store format – a fashion and sports shop for men, women and children, including designer names, and also selling perfume, cosmetics, jewellery and accessories. Also a hairdressing salon. 40,000 sq ft over four floors (LG, G, 1, 2). Restaurant on second floor. Lewis’s tenth store at the time (others in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Leicester, Oxford, Blackpool, Hanley).
  • October 1985: The New Lewis’s opened
  • January 1987: The New Lewis’s closure announced
  • February 1987: The New Lewis’s closed
  • 20 February 1987: Lease taken over by Hamleys
  • June 1988: Closure of Hamleys announced; store to become Poundstretcher

Basically, Lewis’s lasted only from October 1985 to February 1987 – but still longer than Hamleys after it, and certainly longer than The Place before it.

I’m yet to find out how long Poundstretcher lasted (assuming that did happen), and when HMV moved in - I guess that's something to discuss further in the retail memories thread!
Wasn't it Mark One after Hamleys closed? Or am I thinking of somewhere else?

There's a fascinating store room on (I think) the top floor of HMV, with a black and white tiled floor, and what looks like the remains of a cafe/bar area. Not sure what iteration of the store it comes from. Callers is before my time - was there an upstairs cafe?

Edit - just reread your post and noticed the mention of a restaurant on the second floor of Lewis's. I presume that must be it.
 

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Wasn't it Mark One after Hamleys closed? Or am I thinking of somewhere else?.
You could well be right - I have a recollection of reading that somewhere before.

In my archive search, the records went as far as Hamleys departing, with a reference in an old Journal article to Poundstretcher (then apparently owned by the same company as Hamleys, Harris Queensway) moving in. I've yet to unpack exactly what other movements took place between Hamleys going and HMV arriving!
 

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Discussion Starter · #225 ·
Graham Soult, (or anyone else who can help)

as you are our local Woolies expert could you please help me to identify where this photo is taken? Some people think it may be Morpeth's Woolies.


http://www.facebook.com/pages/Old-Pictures-Of-Newcastles-WEST-END-categorized/150729531607278?ref=nf#!/photo.php?fbid=173051756041722&set=a.173054609374770.45070.150729531607278

Cheers
GBDT

Graham,

Did you ever find Morpeth Woolworths?

Here it is, in a copy of Ward Lock's Newcastle Illustrated Guide Book from 1950 . . .

 

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The closed-down Woolies store can be seen on Google Street View, with a "New Iceland store coming soon" sign.
Google Street View's quite fun for this kind of thing - I remember seeing at least one place where the ex-Woolies appears as a Poundland, but you view it from the other direction and it mutates back into a Woolworths again!

Seriously though, I've found it a great tool for checking out the location of old Woolies before actually visiting them in person.
 

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I guess you're surmising that the HMV building could be a suitable spot for Forever 21?

Certainly, the property has had quite a fascinating history over the years, and while it's perhaps best known as the former Callers (well discussed in these forums before), there is a more recent precedent for it being a fashion flagship - under the shortlived 'New Lewis's' brand.

I did some digging around in the local studies library last year, and came up with the following timeline (there's a lot more detail in the newspaper articles I found, which I hope to share here and/or in a blog in due course):

  • Early 1980s: Callers closed
  • March 1984: Callers building sold to Heron Group (10% of space leased to Dixons)
  • (1985: HMV trading at that time from what is now Superdrug, further down Northumberland Street)
  • February 1985: Opening of The Place announced by Foster Brothers – a “new look fashion superstore” in 90% of the former Callers property
  • 1 May 1985: The Place opened – 40,000 sq ft, four floors, with fashions, café and salon
  • 17 July 1985: Closure of The Place announced following Sears’ acquisition of Foster Brothers
  • August 1985: The Place closed; store refurbishment as part of conversion to Lewis’s trial smaller store format – a fashion and sports shop for men, women and children, including designer names, and also selling perfume, cosmetics, jewellery and accessories. Also a hairdressing salon. 40,000 sq ft over four floors (LG, G, 1, 2). Restaurant on second floor. Lewis’s tenth store at the time (others in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Leicester, Oxford, Blackpool, Hanley).
  • October 1985: The New Lewis’s opened
  • January 1987: The New Lewis’s closure announced
  • February 1987: The New Lewis’s closed
  • 20 February 1987: Lease taken over by Hamleys
  • June 1988: Closure of Hamleys announced; store to become Poundstretcher

Basically, Lewis’s lasted only from October 1985 to February 1987 – but still longer than Hamleys after it, and certainly longer than The Place before it.

I’m yet to find out how long Poundstretcher lasted (assuming that did happen), and when HMV moved in - I guess that's something to discuss further in the retail memories thread!
Fascinating stuff.

As a teenager I remember quite a buzz surrounding The Place. Didn't realise it was there for such a short time. Shows how time stretches when you are a kid/teenager.
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
Mawson Swan & Morgan Ltd
Grey Street (corner with Hood Street) and also on Grainger Street
Newcastle upon Tyne

One of the great "Newcastle" shops.

The Mawson Swan & Morgan LOGO, from the 1970s onward . .




Here is the beautiful store on Grey Street, as many of us will remember it . .



In 1978, I remember, Mawsons celebrated reaching 100 years of retailing, here in Newcastle City Centre.

Amongst my own records I have some documentation relating to the 1978 Centenary, a "Mawson Swan & Morgan Centenary Newspaper Supplement" (from the Newcastle Evening Chronicle) from which the following articles all come . . .















Some typical examples of Mawsons product range. Some ADVERTS from the 1978 Centenary Supplement . .



The following narrative comes from the typed up 'working notes' of a member of Mawsons staff, who was deputed to research the origins of the company at the time of the mentioned 1978 Centenary.

She used the company records, which are now deposited in Tyne & Wear Archives at Blandford House (part of the Discovery Museum) for much of her research . . .


Mawson, Swan & Morgan Ltd grew out of a partnership between Joseph Swan, Elizabeth Mawson (his widowed sister - her husband John Mawson having been killed in an explosion on the Town Moor in 17.12.1867) and Joseph Marston. Exactly how this partnership came about I've been unable to establish precisely. As far as I can make out Swan and John Mawson had been in partnership with several businesses bearing their surnames. I have some less detailed notes about them, too. Swan had a finger in several pies.

After John Mawson's death Joseph Marston was brought into partnership about 1868-9. Elizabeth Mawson's partnership dated from 1868. Marston was primarily a bookseller with a circulating library, but was also a chemist.

The earliest account books that can still be traced indicate Thomas Morgan arrived from Belfast before October 1873, probably earlier that year. His father died in Belfast in 1874, so what brought him to Newcastle is uncertain. Elizabeth Mawson was a sleeping partner, the business serving the purpose of providing her with an income. Swan also was soon a sleeping partner, the business quickly being taken over and run by the dynamic Thomas Morgan. This allowed Swan to concentrate on his scientific work.

Thomas Morgan was present at the lecture in the Lit & Phil on 20th October 1880 with Sir William Armstrong in the chair. 70 gas jets were dimmed, and 20 electric light bulbs were turned on. This was the first time in Europe that a public building had been lighted by an incandescent lamp. Morgan had been sent to London immediately prior to this lecture to bring Col. Crompton that night to see the event.

The shop business grew, with a printing works, a publishing side, an art gallery, leather goods (Morgan's father was a leather merchant) books and the circulating library - and a theatrical agency. At one time there were shops in Bristol and Hull, with exhibitions of paintings arranged throughout the country.

What many people do not know, is that (in addition to their famous 'Grey Street' store) Mawsons also had an 'artists materials shop and art gallery' in nearby Grainger Street. At 58-62 Grainger Street, to be precise. The main shop in Grey Street is where most of us remember them as being (in 2011, the former Waterstones building, then H & M, now Byron Burgers) though originally they were actually lower down Grey Street, in some rented buildings, before the move into their famous premises on the corner of Hood Street and Grey Street.

Within the family the business was known as "Mawsons". The telegraphic address was "Morgan Newcastle-on-Tyne".

Eventually, Swan bowed out and left things to young Thomas.

Examination of the local press shows some dynamic advertising, well ahead of it's time - special offers and promotions. I believe Thomas Morgan had an uncle Charles Morgan who had operated in a similar way with shops in Belfast and Dublin before giving it all up to become the first Baptist minister in Jarrow.

Why did Thomas Morgan come to Newcastle? I wish I knew. However, Swan kept so much within the family. Mawson, Swan & Morgan - himself, and his sister.

Swan remarried after his first wife died, to his first wife's sister - in Switzerland because it was illegal at that time in England. A third sister lived with them. His wife's maiden surname was White. Thomas Morgan's mother was also a White - and he married another girl named White. I believe there may well have been a family connection - but that remains speculation, shrouded in Irish mystery.

I have a small "souvenir" of Mawson Swan & Morgan - one of their paper bags inscribed with their logo . .




MORE PHOTOS . . .

Now, here are two aerial photos of the Grey Street shop, the second one of which was taken after they had closed down. One thing that both of these photos do show clearly (as do most of the other photos shown later in this post) is the run of "Ornamental Lamposts" outside the shop.

These were placed at the edge of the original pavement, and were installed and funded by Mawsons themselves. They are still there today.

1981 . .


Circa 2000 . .



Some more HISTORIC photos of Mawson Swan & Morgan's Grey Street shop, over the years.

1916 . .



During the 1935 King George V Silver Jubilee . .


1953, during the Coronation celebrations . .


Looking along Hood Street, in 1966 . .



Here is an advert from 1950, from the Ward Lock Illustrated Handbook of Newcastle and Northumberland, of that year . .




FINALLY, here is a collection of information about the 'less well remembered' Grainger Street Store, which was known as their "Fine Art" Store . . .

Here are some photos of the GRAINGER STREET premises of Mawsons . . .






The above ADVERT is from a 1966 issue of the 'Newcastle Life Magazine', and below is a photo of what 58-62 Grainger Street looks like today, in 2011 . . .




OTHER information about Mawson Swan & Morgan, here on this Forum . . .


MAWSON SWAN & MORGAN . . .
The History of Mawson Swan & Morgan - of Grey Street (and Grainger Street)
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
John Mawson dies in and explosion on the Town Moor - 17th December 1867
The Town Moor
The Town Moor
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
John Mawson's Death (see above) - Details of "P.C. Donald Bain" who was also killed in the same Town Moor explosion
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
The Listed Lamposts outside Mawson Swan & Morgan
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
The "Grainger Street branch - the other (and lesser known) premises of Mawson Swan & Morgan
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
Memorabillia of Joseph Swan and 'Mawson Swan & Morgan - On the Tyne & Wear Archives Photostream
RETAIL MEMORIES : from times past in Newcastle and the...
Two fires at Mawson's (Mawson & Swan's) chemists premises on Mosley Street - Firstly on 19th September 1857 and secondly on 23rd September 1890
Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even...
Glass Windows - The Ornate Glass Windows of the Mawson Swan & Morgan building, just above the ground Floor - photographed in 2015 (during 'Byron Burgers' conversion)
Test your Newcastle GENERAL KNOWLEDGE . . .

So, the above post contains quite a bit of information about one of my personal favourite Newcastle shops of the past . . . Mawson Swan & Morgan.

All items and photos that are not my own, are from the Newcastle City Council / City Libraries PHOTOSTREAM Website - http://www.flickr.com/search/[email protected]&q=Mawson+Swan+&+Morgan&m=text

NB - If there is any more information or photos about Mawson Swan & Morgan out there . . . I (for one) would LOVE to see it!!

.
 

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Mawson Swan & Morgan Ltd
One of the great "Newcastle" shops.

Mawson Swan & Morgan were one of my select band of famous Newcastle Shops that always made me realise (after I had been on my travels) that I was truly back in Newcastle when I went into them.

That short list of shops included Fenwicks, Callers, Isaac Waltons, and J G Windows record shop, and (for me) that was about it! Happily, two out of the four are still with us here in 2011!

So, I think Mawson Swan & Morgan definitely deserves a bit of coverage on this 'Retail Memories' thread . . .

In 1978, I remember, Mawsons celebrated reaching 100 years of retailing in Newcastle.

If there is any more information or photos about Mawson Swan & Morgan out there . . . I (for one) would LOVE to see it!!
What a great collection of Ephemera on this subject - I think that in addition to the main Partnership of Mawson, Swan and Morgan, there is so much history about each person individually that would probably deserve a thread to itself :)
 

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The New "Callers" building, built in 1971, after the December 1969 fire . . .

(Details of the fire, etc, here - http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=44745826&postcount=1)


When it was CALLERS . .



Now, as HMV . . .



I guess you're surmising that the HMV building could be a suitable spot for Forever 21?

Certainly, the property has had quite a fascinating history over the years, and it is best known as the newly built Callers furniture store (well discussed on the "Historic Newcastle" thread, see 'link' above) from 1971 onwards.

There is a more recent precedent for it being a fashion flagship though - under the shortlived 'New Lewis's' brand.

I did some digging around in the local studies library last year, and came up with the following timeline (there's a lot more detail in the newspaper articles I found, which I hope to share here and/or in a blog in due course):

  • Early 1980s: Callers closed
  • March 1984: Callers building sold to Heron Group (10% of space leased to Dixons)
  • (1985: HMV trading at that time from what is now Superdrug, further down Northumberland Street)
  • February 1985: Opening of The Place announced by Foster Brothers – a “new look fashion superstore” in 90% of the former Callers property
  • 1 May 1985: The Place opened – 40,000 sq ft, four floors, with fashions, café and salon
  • 17 July 1985: Closure of The Place announced following Sears’ acquisition of Foster Brothers
  • August 1985: The Place closed; store refurbishment as part of conversion to Lewis’s trial smaller store format – a fashion and sports shop for men, women and children, including designer names, and also selling perfume, cosmetics, jewellery and accessories. Also a hairdressing salon. 40,000 sq ft over four floors (LG, G, 1, 2). Restaurant on second floor. Lewis’s tenth store at the time (others in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Leicester, Oxford, Blackpool, Hanley).
  • October 1985: The New Lewis’s opened
  • January 1987: The New Lewis’s closure announced
  • February 1987: The New Lewis’s closed
  • 20 February 1987: Lease taken over by Hamleys
  • June 1988: Closure of Hamleys announced; store to become Poundstretcher

Basically, Lewis’s lasted only from October 1985 to February 1987 – but still longer than Hamleys after it, and certainly longer than The Place before it.

I’m yet to find out how long Poundstretcher lasted (assuming that did happen), and when HMV moved in - I guess that's something to discuss further in the retail memories thread!

I can't remember it being made into a Poundstretcher but as mentioned earlier it definitely became Mark One after Hamleys.

One thing you haven't mentioned about the shop was the fact that Virgin used to operate from the basement when it was Hamleys (and I think Mark One too). I don't know when this arrangement started but I guess it finished when Virgin moved its other store from Eldon Square to the new megastore on the corner of Northumberland St/Blackett St.

I have fond memories of the basement Virgin. Some of it still exists in the basement of HMV but only a fraction of the size.

F
 

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Discussion Starter · #235 · (Edited)
From the P&T Image Archive for NH.

Grey_S_001 by GBDT, on Flickr[/IMG]

Grainger_S_016 by GBDT, on Flickr[/IMG]


Cheers
GBDT

I wondered if you would have anything GBDT, I thought you might!

The shot of the main shop is a good-un, but to see another view of the rarely photographed Grainger Street shop, is great.

Thanks for those!
 

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I can't remember it being made into a Poundstretcher but as mentioned earlier it definitely became Mark One after Hamleys.

One thing you haven't mentioned about the shop was the fact that Virgin used to operate from the basement when it was Hamleys (and I think Mark One too). I don't know when this arrangement started but I guess it finished when Virgin moved its other store from Eldon Square to the new megastore on the corner of Northumberland St/Blackett St.

I have fond memories of the basement Virgin. Some of it still exists in the basement of HMV but only a fraction of the size.

F
Thanks for this extra info! It seems that the building has had an even more complex history than I thought.

Out of interest, where was the old Virgin in Eldon Square? I was aware that one had existed prior to Virgin taking over the former Woolworths/Next (now Peacocks) site, but not its location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #237 ·
Out of interest, where was the old Virgin in Eldon Square? I was aware that one had existed prior to Virgin taking over the former Woolworths/Next (now Peacocks) site, but not its location.

In 1986 Virgin Records were still in their Eldon Square location (per the 85/86 Map, below) which was on High Friars, virtually opposite WH Smith . . .




High Friars enlarged . .



 

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Discussion Starter · #240 ·
Fascinating thread - it would be good to see articles on other North-East stores such as Shepherd's in Gateshead.

One omission from the Newcastle list is the short-lived Lewis's. An outpost of the famous Liverpool company (and nothing to do with John Lewis) it was a fairly small department store and only existed for a few years in the 1980s, but it occupied a prominent site on Northumberland Street and was, as I recall, rather upmarket.

The very short-lived Lewis's, in the former Callers building on Northumberland Street, was not included (by me, anyway) on this thread, as that branch wasn't really a Department Store.

The Newcastle Store only contained a small selection of the proper Lewis's Department Store range, a bit like the (equally short-lived) Debenhams at Home store in Eldon Gardens in the 1990s did, of the full 'Debenhams' range.
 
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