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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the shortlist of six buildings up for this year's biggest prize in British architecture is announced tomorrow morning 23 July.

will any of the seven north west winners make it...

- 13b Paradise Street, Liverpool, Allies & Morrison (leisure complex housing Odeon cinema and restaurants)
- Paradise Street Bridge, Liverpool, Wilkinson Eyre Architects
- Liverpool One Masterplan, Liverpool, BDP
- BDP Studio, Manchester, BDP
- Midland Hotel, Morecambe, Union North
- Private House, Stockport, MBLA Architects + Urbanists
- Three Towers, Manchester, Union North

in total 103 buildings were picked across the UK

can they really ignore Liverpool One?

:applause:
 

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can they really ignore Liverpool One?
You'd think not wouldn't you, but having seen what they picked as the winner for last year's Stirling Prize, who knows what they're looking for in a nominee and winner?

Of the three Liverpool ONE nominees, it's no secret I've always viewed the bridge as a missed opportunity, but it's not without interest, and I appreciate it has its fans, and as such, I wouldn't mind seeing it recognised nationally. As for the masterplan, I wonder how far it can go, as it may not capture the judges as much as a physical building does (although it's undoubtedly worthy). Site 13B is also highly worthy. Although there are visually more appealing buildings, the way it combines the two levels of parking, two levels of retail, and the leisure terrace together in what is a monolithic block, but maintains ease of movement to all levels and through the block is really good. Hopefully we will see at least one of the Liverpool ONE nominees get a nod, as they certainly deserve it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Liverpool One masterplan made it!!!


from AJ today...

RIBA Stirling Prize 2009 - shortlist revealed
23 July, 2009

RSHP's Bodegas Protos winery near Valladolid, Spain

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has a double chance to repeat its 2006 Stirling Prize victory after both its winery in Spain and London Maggie’s Centre were shortlisted for this year’s prize, sponsored by the AJ with visualisation firm Crystal CG

Richard Rogers is the only architect on this year’s six-strong shortlist to have previously won the award, having landed the prestigious prize three years ago for his Barajas Airport in Madrid.

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris will be hoping its Kentish Town Health Centre has better luck than its Westminster Academy, a frontrunner for last year’s prize, while Eric Parry Architects will also want its 5 Aldermanbury Square offices to go further than its 2003 shortlisting for its 30 Finsbury Square scheme.

The inclusion of BDP’s Liverpool One has forced jurors Sam Jacob of FAT and Edward Jones of Dixon Jones to drop out – both architects completed projects within the massive retail scheme. However it has since been confirmed the judging panel will now include Benedetta Tagliabue of EMBT, John Sorrell of CABE and Thomas Heatherwick and will be chaired by John Tuomey, of Dublin-based O’Donnell and Tuomey.

The bookies’ early favourite is Tony Fretton Architects’ Fuglsang Kunstmuseum in Denmark (click here to see William Hill’s latest odds on the Stirling prize).

The shortlist in full - click on each for full descriptions, citations and more images

Maggie’s Centre, London, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Bodegas Protos, Spain, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Fuglsang Kunstmuseum, Denmark, Tony Fretton Architects

5 Aldermanbury Square’ London, Eric Parry Architects

Liverpoool One Masterplan, Liverpool, BDP

Kentish Town Health Centre, London, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

The winner will be announced at a ceremony in London’s Old Billingsgate Market on 17 October and will again be televsied by Channel 4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
probably. unity/20chapel street won a north west award and a national riba award but not on stirling. manchester's cjc was on stirling shortlist last year.

awesome. and the professionals that did it were in liverpool already, just as important in my book.
 

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Yeah, leading on from its Riba Northwest award, Unity made it onto only the Stirling "mid-list" but not the shortlist (the regional awards channel into the Stirling prize selection lists).
 

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from the Guardian

Stirling prize leaves me feeling cold
Low-key, meditative buildings dominate on a shortlist responding to the economic hangover, but how can a rural arts museum be judged against a city office block?



Jonathan Glancey
guardian.co.uk, Friday 24 July 2009 13.24 BST
Article history



Chaste and almost monastic ...Fuglsang Kuntstmuseum Photograph: Helene Binet

The Stirling prize shortlist announced by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) yesterday is, serendipitously, an appropriate one for a recession. Here is an exquisite Spanish winery by Rogers, Stirk and Harbour, a place where booze flows by the mega-litre, as if ready to drown pains induced by economic woe.

Over there, a light and airy London health centre by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) - as fine a place as any the NHS can offer to recover from depression, anxiety and alcohol-related illness. There's also Maggie's Centre, a beautifully-designed hospice in London, also by Rogers Stirk Harbour, and the calm and refined Fuglsang Kunstmuseum, a meditative arts building by Tony Fretton on a country estate overlooking the sea on the Danish island of Lolland . There are chaste, almost monastic, rooms here for visitors. Anyone suffering from the excesses of the economic culture that led to the current recession might like to cool off and reflect about life with Fretton's calm architecture as a gentle prop.

As for the other two Stirling prize contenders, these seem to represent the very economic culture that has caused so much pain: a City of London office block and an enormous shopping centre. Admittedly, the office block – 5 Aldermanbury Square – by Eric Parry Architects is particularly elegant, but it's still essentially a design for bankers and their chums, while the giant shopping mall, Liverpool One by BDP, is banality writ as large as any typeface can be stretched.

This year might also be seen as a recession shortlist because the buildings on it are decidedly low-key compared to the designs that have been nominated for – and won – the Stirling prize in earlier years. The Lords Media Centre, 30 St Mary Axe — aka the Gherkin – the Scottish parliament building and Barajas airport's Terminal 4 all share a flamboyant charisma, out of step with current nominees.

Low-key doesn't mean lesser architecture, though. Far from it. This year's favourites, Fretton's Danish museum (3-1) and Rogers's Maggie's Centre (4-1), are gems rather than bangles, while AHMM's Kentish Town health centre shows how well a tight public sector budget can be spent.

And yet, prizes like this have always left me a feeling a little detached, and even cold. I'm not sure what they prove, nor how anyone can judge a city office block in the same category as a rural arts museum or, indeed, a tightly-budgeted health centre. The Stirling prize is, I suppose, knockabout fun, but many architects do appear to take it very seriously. If the award was purely for architecture, then this year's winner ought to be Tony Fretton's Fuglsang Museum; if, however, the prize is to be political, then perhaps AHMM's health centre would make a telling winner - a sign of what decent modern architecture can do for the beleaguered NHS.

If RIBA and its judges want to stick two fingers up to the Prince of Wales and all his interfering ways, then they have two Richard Rogers' buildings to choose from this year, in the cancer hospice and winery. As for the inclusion of Liverpool One, I can only imagine this must be some kind of drunken joke. It's a scheme that has made this once hugely distinctive city look much like anywhere else; the fact that it opened in the city's year as European Capital of Culture was as close to satire as architecture gets. And, yet, as Johnny Rotten once bawled: "your future dream's a shopping scheme". The British public, it seems, will still drink to that.
Source: guardian.co.uk
 

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As for the inclusion of Liverpool One, I can only imagine this must be some kind of drunken joke. It's a scheme that has made this once hugely distinctive city look much like anywhere else;
Eh? How, architecturally speaking, has it made us look like anywhere else? If anything, it has made the city more unique. While not every building is stand-out, there are several architecturally interesting buildings or features scattered through-out the development, helping to further diversify the architectural interest in the city. It should also be remembered, that there was little of architectural interest located in the area previously, with the odd buildings that were of architectural interest being saved, and brought back into use, so we haven't lost anything worth keeping that was previously there. I could be doing the author a dis-service, but his comments to me suggest a lack of knowledge about the scheme, both in terms of what was there previously, and what is there now. If I'm wrong, and he does have a good understanding of the development, then I simply can't get my head around his comments.
 

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Glancey does know Liverpool reasonably well and has written nice things about the city's architecture in the past. I suspect that he is, however, not so knowledgable about Liverpool One, as you suspect, Chris.
 

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Another thought I just had, as it is the Masterplan that has been nominated, rather than any individual building or feature, surely the aesthetics are of little relevance here, with the emphasis being on how the development was conceived? Surely decisions like using an open streets approach rather than a closed mall, burying the car park under an area of green space, and the very close integration with the existing retail core, are what the judges should be looking at went assessing the merits of the Masterplan, not what individual buildings look like?
 

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It's also de rigeur to make this kind of comment about shopping centres. British critics are nothing if not sheep-like in their behaviour. On the other hand, the Sterling prize is a bit of an in-house thing for architects up their own arses so what wins is often more an expression of what is currently being obsessed about within the little cabal of Brit-arch.

Not to be reductionistic or anything.
 

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Wayne Colquhoun's comments :bash:

Liverpool-One or as it is known locally Grosvenor-pool has been nominated for a Stirling Prize for its master plan. Those Chumley Backslappers Anonymous at RIBA are apparently attempting to 'award themselves' a prize, as it is the scheme containing the most of its nominees. I wish I was proud of this achievement and be flagging up the fact. But I am not. Th e fact that a Precinct could be up for a Stirling Prize! Is this the sad state of British Architecture apparent? I know we have been credit crunched but if this is the overall standard of this years architecture it is not the best of years. For what Grosvenor have done to Chavasse Lawn and how it has helped to destroy the WORLD HERITAGE SITE, is very bad.....They promised us world class architecture a Cesar Pelli...and give us a Cesar Salad. And now they, at RIBA have nominated themselves for a prize for it. Wayne Colquhoun LIVERPOOL PRESERVATION TRUST LIVERPOOL PRESERVATION TRUST
 

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^^ "Chavasse Lawn"? Wayne, you mean that bit of scruffy grass we used to have, with the crisp packets blowing around in the wind? How anyone can lament its loss staggers the mind.
 

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Wayne Colquhoun's comments :bash:

Liverpool-One or as it is known locally Grosvenor-pool has been nominated for a Stirling Prize for its master plan. Those Chumley Backslappers Anonymous at RIBA are apparently attempting to 'award themselves' a prize, as it is the scheme containing the most of its nominees. I wish I was proud of this achievement and be flagging up the fact. But I am not. Th e fact that a Precinct could be up for a Stirling Prize! Is this the sad state of British Architecture apparent? I know we have been credit crunched but if this is the overall standard of this years architecture it is not the best of years. For what Grosvenor have done to Chavasse Lawn and how it has helped to destroy the WORLD HERITAGE SITE, is very bad.....They promised us world class architecture a Cesar Pelli...and give us a Cesar Salad. And now they, at RIBA have nominated themselves for a prize for it. Wayne Colquhoun LIVERPOOL PRESERVATION TRUST LIVERPOOL PRESERVATION TRUST
Sounds like a bad wind up, the chavasse lawn...pathetic :lol: how short does he think our memories are...we do know what was there before Wayne!, wonder how many people are in his trust, he sounds like a one man bandwagon, the 'preservation trust' title gives him an air of importance and crediibiliity that he doesn't deserve judging by those ridiculous comments and other ones I have seen attributed to him over the years.

Is there anything he does like? is there any new or modern buildings he likes? is Liverpool supposed to a museum piece that never changes? preseving old buildings and beautiful architecture is a noble aim but he also has to acknowledge that times change as well, and preseving everything the way it is, is unrealistic but in this case who mourns for what was lost?
 

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Building Design


Amanda Baillieu
Stirling has already swayed from its origins, so why not include masterplans?

Masterplan for the future
31 July 2009

An interesting debate has broken out on whether or not a masterplan should be eligible for Stirling when the prize was set up to award a building. Of course, since then it has been given to a bridge, as well as some sexy lighting and interactive exhibits, so why not? The jury who voted for Liverpool One to join this year’s list of contenders claims it is a significant model for retail led regeneration in a way that Westfield in west London is not, and has given the city a cool new centre to be proud of.

There’s no doubt that the result is far more successful than the clumping banality of Birmingham’s Bullring, or indeed the architecturally challenged Westfield. And Grosvenor, which commissioned more than 20 architects to work on individual buildings, should certainly be in the running for client of the year.

Masterplanning is fiendishly difficult to do well and yet those who do rarely get the profile they deserve. It is also one of the few sectors holding up well in a recession, partly because clients are keen to prepare sites for development even if they cannot afford to build. The sight of tens of thousands of empty flats — where no masterplan exists — has made it clear that the physical, social and economic revival of our towns and cities needs more and deeper thinking if it’s to survive the next boom and bust.

Other comments about this year’s shortlist are that it looks a bit thin. There is no obvious winner and even the favourites do not have the star quality of previous shortlists. But as the recession slows down all building, future years may be even leaner and masterplans might have to plug that gap.

Moving the prize even further away from the solid virtues of architecture is never going to be popular with those architects who have dominated the list, and it’s something that needs to be debated, particularly if the prize is to retain its high profile which relies on having eye-catching buildings to film.

But while this time round the inclusion of Liverpool One looks odd, architectural interests are changing, as are the ways ideas are communicated. In future years it may be buildings that look odd on the Stirling shortlist, not masterplans.
Source: http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp...6007&channel=783&c=2&encCode=00000000019f1c22
 

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Stirling Prize named after University of Liverpool’s school of architecture graduate James Stirling
Oct 12 2009
by Vicky Anderson, Liverpool Daily Post

THE Stirling Prize is named after one of the UK’s most famous and influential architects – who honed his craft studying at the University of Liverpool’s School of Architecture.

James Stirling was born in Glasgow and came to Merseyside after active service in World War II, studying here between 1945 and 1950.

Professor Rob Kronenburg from the university said: “He developed his own style of architecture, which was really aimed at getting people involved in, and enjoying, the building. His work was not pompous or posh, but more colourful, enjoyable, almost playful architecture.”

His most well-known building is the Neue Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart, Germany, and he is also known for the extention to the Tate Gallery in London.

Locally, a housing project in Runcorn by Stirling was demolished in 1990 when it fell out of fashion. His only remaining work in the city is the refurbishment of Tate Liverpool.

Stirling was a recipient of RIBA’s gold medal – one of six gold medalists to come from Liverpool University’s school of architecture, thought to be more than any other school.

Coincidentally, one of those six is Jim Eyre, partner and director of Wilkinson Eyre, who designed the Liverpool Echo Arena – now successfully linked to the rest of the city by Liverpool One.

James Stirling died in 1992.

The Stirling Prize was named after him in 1996.

There are still links to Stirling at the architecture school. His practice partner Michael Wilsford is an external examiner there, and a team recently built a scale model of the community centre he designed as part of his final university thesis.

He was also among the alumni featured in a book and travelling exhibition on the university’s architecture school, The World in One School, specially devised for Capital of Culture year.
Source: Liverpool Daily Post
 
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