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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
JULY 2013 ranking list


Some other high and low points from the report:

  • North Dakota ranks No. 1 when it comes to state-controlled road systems, followed by Kansas, Wyoming, New Mexico and Montana.
  • At the bottom, in descending order, are New York, New Jersey, California, Hawaii, Rhode Island and Alaska.
  • Vermont wins for the nation's most-improved road system, rising to 28th place from 42nd in the overall rankings. New Hampshire and Washington state both rose nine spots.
  • Minnesota fell 17 spots for its road conditions, from 25th to 42nd. It also had the second-highest percentage of gridlocked interstate systems after California.
  • The nation's lowest interstate fatality rate was in Massachusetts and the highest in Montana.
Here's the foundation's complete state highway list, based on overall performance and cost effectiveness:






1. North Dakota
2. Kansas
3. Wyoming
4. New Mexico
5. Montana
6. Nebraska
7. South Carolina
8. Missouri
9. South Dakota
10. Mississippi
11. Texas
12. Georgia
13. Oregon
14. Kentucky
15. Virginia
16. Nevada
17. Idaho
18. New Hampshire
19. North Carolina
20. Delaware
21. Tennessee
22. Indiana
23. Arizona
24. Washington
25. Ohio
26. Utah
27. Alabama
28. Vermont
29. Maine
30. Michigan
31. Wisconsin
32. West Virginia
33. Iowa
34. Illinois
35. Louisiana
36. Arkansas
37. Florida
38. Oklahoma
39. Pennsylvania
40. Maryland
41. Colorado
42. Minnesota
43. Massachusetts
44. Connecticut
45. New York
46. New Jersey
47. California
48. Hawaii
49. Rhode Island
50. Alaska
http://money.msn.com/now/post--which-states-have-the-worst-roads



US States really need to do more to improve their main and secondary roads. Many of the roads in US are old and badly in need of repair. One major problem I've noticed is the quality of repair and construction has declined in US ever since US has relied on cheap foreign laborers to to do construction on the roads. I will give specific examples, many of the foreign laborers are not trained or skilled in construction, many times when they fill a pot hole they overfill it with cement causing an uneven road surface. Many of them don't even paint the road lines straight and correctly, I have seen some dash mark lines crooked and double-painted yellow lines that are crooked. Another problem with US roads is we have too many damn manhole covers in the street every 10 feet--there's simply no need for that.

US states have to rely on trained construction workers to repair roads and provide funding for this. Compared to Europe the US is far behind in road quality.
 

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Bethesda,MD thru SF & ATL
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On road quality, I've driven 40 states and Pennsylvania is BY FAR the worst. I can't think of anything close.

In regards to these rankings I think Southern states have an advantage because they can construct concrete roads without regard to damage caused by road salt. The more expensive Macadamized roads of the North likely bring down their rankings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
On road quality, I've driven 40 states and Pennsylvania is BY FAR the worst. I can't think of anything close.

In regards to these rankings I think Southern states have an advantage because they can construct concrete roads without regard to damage caused by road salt. The more expensive Macadamized roads of the North likely bring down their rankings.

Northern states also have higher state revenue and budgets and should be able to maintain their roads as well which they fail to do. Especially MD and NY no excuse, two wealthy states. I read the the road maintenance is funded by fixed gas tax, if that's true that could be a problem because more money to be diverted to improving the roads in the states.
 

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Until this year roads in VA were solely funded by the gas tax (McDonnell to his credit has changed the funding mechanism). It did create a huge funding gap as the commonwealth added thousands of miles of new roads at the same time that gas mileage improved significantly. No one had the guts to raise the tax (which hadn't been increased since the early 80's). There was a proposal to impose a fee on electric and hybrid vehicles to punish them for not buying enough gas (you can't make this stuff up!).
So yeah, revenue from gas taxes aren't keeping pace with the costs of maintaining the roads.
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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Any list that has New Mexico in the Top Ten is clearly suspect! :lol:

I would rate Texas much higher but there has been a lot of construction lately which leads to delays and inconvenience. It's also not surprising that states ranked lowest tend to be those snowy, heavily populated cold weather states where roads take a beating each year. It's never easy keeping up with that...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Any list that has New Mexico in the Top Ten is clearly suspect! :lol:

I would rate Texas much higher but there has been a lot of construction lately which leads to delays and inconvenience. It's also not surprising that states ranked lowest tend to be those snowy, heavily populated cold weather states where roads take a beating each year. It's never easy keeping up with that...

China has cold weather and even higher population and number of commuters in cities like Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong. UK as well like London and Manchester. Japan with Tokyo, Osaka, and other heavily populated cities who experience similar cold weather and snow and yet their roads are still far better than many American states. Problem is American roads are old and not well maintained. US states also allow many trucks to use many main streets and secondary streets is also a problem, creating designated roads for trucks would be a good idea--I think China may have done that as well.


Anyone think the quality of the cement the construction companies use could also be a factor in the deterioration of the roads-- even when new roads are built sometimes you can start to see cracks in them just after a few years which shouldn't happen.

There's really no excuse for a 16 trillion dollar economy to have such poor roads. It can be such a pain driving on bad roads, there's also a problem of too many manhole covers in the roads.
 

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China today is where the U.S. was in the 50's. The infrastructure is still relatively new. The U.K. does not see North American winters. The northern U.S. has a major problem with the freeze/thaw cycle. The U.K. hardly ever dips below freezing. I would also bet that the U.K. doesn't see the traffic volume on its roads the way the U.S. does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
China today is where the U.S. was in the 50's. The infrastructure is still relatively new. The U.K. does not see North American winters. The northern U.S. has a major problem with the freeze/thaw cycle. The U.K. hardly ever dips below freezing. I would also bet that the U.K. doesn't see the traffic volume on its roads the way the U.S. does.

UK does receive very cold winters and freezing temperatures, I don't think you've been to UK. Scotland receives heavy snow fall each year and so does northern Ireland. London sees far more traffic volume and heavy bus use than many major American cities. It is also a major tourist destination.

I think European countries must also be using a higher quality concrete than many American construction and road pavement companies.
 

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^^The UK doesn't receive very cold winters. The British Isles are quite mild; you can even see certain types of palms growing as far north as Edinburgh and Cardiff. Winters there simply are not harsh.

The point that Hudkina is making is that the ground rarely freezes in Europe. Aside from Alpine areas on continental Europe or in the Nordics, it's usually not cold enough in the winter for frost to develop in the ground.

This is why roads in the northern US (particularly the Upper Midwest) are so susceptible to buckling and pot holes. The ground expands and contracts whenever the ground freezes and thaws, damaging pavement. It's an ongoing struggle just to keep roads maintained, especially on heavily traveled corridors.
 

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One example, is that Michigan began experimenting a few years ago with a popular European style of concrete road construction. Within a few months, major potholes began forming, and after a couple years, the roads had to be reconstructed. Despite being durable and long-lasting in Europe, the mix was a disaster for Michigan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Has anyone drove on I-95 south in Maryland recently major improvements, it feels like you're driving in Dubai super smooth highway.
 
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