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You can buy some souvenir signs from some of the retail avenues in Kowloon. I might get one of them to put up in my room back home :)
I got a set of them in magnet form a while ago.
 

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I feel like I identify more with the street names that are originally in Chinese, with the hugely inaccurate English transliterations.
 

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Out of curiosity, how are the street names translated from English->Cantonese or Cantonese->English ?

for example, how did they translate Connaught or Des Voeux into Chinese characters? Is the pronunciation similar? Or does the street name have an entire different meaning in Chinese?

I find the British street names in HK absolutely fascinating, I hope pro-Bejing people never go ahead and rename these roads. They add so much character to the city.
 

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Out of curiosity, how are the street names translated from English->Cantonese or Cantonese->English ?

for example, how did they translate Connaught or Des Voeux into Chinese characters? Is the pronunciation similar? Or does the street name have an entire different meaning in Chinese?

I find the British street names in HK absolutely fascinating, I hope pro-Bejing people never go ahead and rename these roads. They add so much character to the city.
All roads in Hong Kong have both Chinese and English names.

When they translated the names, they chose Chinese characters that have more or less similar pronounciation to the English road names and replace the "street/road" with the Chinese word itself.
 

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Out of curiosity, how are the street names translated from English->Cantonese or Cantonese->English ?

for example, how did they translate Connaught or Des Voeux into Chinese characters? Is the pronunciation similar? Or does the street name have an entire different meaning in Chinese?

I find the British street names in HK absolutely fascinating, I hope pro-Bejing people never go ahead and rename these roads. They add so much character to the city.
They were named in every way you mentioned.

Some roads were named in English first, then translated to Cantonese and Chinese based on pronunciation. For example, Connaught Road, Des Voeux Road, Nathan Road etc.

Some roads were named in Chinese/Cantonese, and translated into English by pronunciation. For example, Lan Kwai Fong and Wan Chai Road.

Some roads were named in either Chinese or English, but then translated into the other languages by meaning, such as Boundary Street, Queen's Road E/C/W, King's Road, First Street, Second Street etc. They mean exactly the same definition.

Some roads were named completely different in Chinese and English. Looking at the Chinese will have no clue in English, or vice versa. They were more likely to have an old Chinese name, but then named by the British the other way for any reason. Places like Aberdeen, Stanley, Causeway Bay, Quarry Bay etc.
 

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All roads in Hong Kong have both Chinese and English names.

When they translated the names, they chose Chinese characters that have more or less similar pronounciation to the English road names and replace the "street/road" with the Chinese word itself.
Linguist nit-pick. :lol: There are broadly 3 types of street names in Hong Kong, which are:

1) English Colonial names, with transcriptions. Example would be "Hollywood Road", where it is phoneticised into Cantonese (Yale) as "hòh léih wuht douh". These are found on "Hong Kong proper", namely on Island side and south of Boundary Street.

2) English Colonial names, with transliteration. These are fewer, but an example is "Ice House Street", where it is phoneticised into Cantonese (Yale) as "syǔt chóng gaāi"... where "syǔt chóng" is "Ice House", "gaāi" is "Street". These (if memory serves) are exclusively found on Island side only.*

3) Chinese names with English transcriptions. Many examples... eg: "Fa Yuen Street" (Flower Garden Street).

Oh... and there is a 4th! Street names where the English and Chinese have absolutely nothing to do with each other. There's a photo of an example already, which is "Possession Street" (this was where the Brits landed and declared Hong Kong was part of the British Empire from that moment onwards), where as the Chinese says "水坑口街", which basically means "Water Levy Street". :lol:

Edit: Re 2, Wait... there's "Soy Street" in Mong Kok... (still south of Boundary Street though) :nuts: Though technically that should be an existing Chinese name, which got an English transliteration. Must be a Kowloon thing. ;)
 
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