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Can you plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz show lygon St or Brunswick st??? Best streets ever!
I remember travelling up and down russell street when i was in Melb - love it. (is it the main st) it seems to be the main thoroughfare between the city and the suburbs.
 

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A street not often frequented by many, I haven't been to (or been past!) the old gaol in years.
 

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Can you plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz show lygon St or Brunswick st??? Best streets ever!
I remember travelling up and down russell street when i was in Melb - love it. (is it the main st) it seems to be the main thoroughfare between the city and the suburbs.
Melbourne has no 'main street' -- however this could be said to be Bourke, Collins or Swanston, depending on how you look at it.

Russell Street is not the main North-South thoroughfare -- that is King Street (in the West End) and Exhibition Street (in the East End).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can you plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz show lygon St or Brunswick st??? Best streets ever!
I remember travelling up and down russell street when i was in Melb - love it. (is it the main st) it seems to be the main thoroughfare between the city and the suburbs.
Although Russell Street becomes Lygon Street once you cross Victoria Street, Lygon Street is in Carlton, not the city.

At the moment I'm concentrating on the city streets and in the future will start to shoot suburban streets as well, but not soon.

Brunswick Street is in Fitzroy, so no photos soon, and as for Melbourne's main thoroughfare, read Alphaville's post. :)
 

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One building missing from here- which is of cultural rather than architectural significance (if you ask me)- is the Russell Street Facade of the State Library/former National Gallery/Museum: I'm not sure I have any photos of it.
 

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I guess I'm pre-empting part 2 here, but this building dominates the southern part of Russell Street:



The T&G Building stood with the L&G and the Manchester Unity in my childhood, dominating the commercial landscape of Melbourne. It was full of dentists, but has now been taken over by KPMG.



A rare example of an office building extending a full half-block (330 feet) in Melbourne. Across the road, the Grand Hyatt Melbourne:



Much of Russell Street has a large median strip given over to parking, public toilets (now filled with concerete) and public sculpture:



The other half of this sculpture: during the reconstruction of the Bourke St. tram-lines:



For a CBD street, Russell Street retains a significant number of two-storey Victorian terraces:



Close-up of an entrance to the former City Court, now part of RMIT ...



Old Melbourne Gaol ...



And Emily McPherson College ...

 

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Well done again Collector, and great addition on T&G Yardmaster - I used to like the tiny Coin and Stamp dealers shop on the ground floor there.

But Russell Street has many old associations,
mainly at the City Court and all-night pressman shifts at the old Russell Street Police Headquarters, known as D-24 (after the police radio call sign, and of course a famous old radio serial long before many or any of the young guys here will remember). Shepherd's Hotel (adjacent to City Court entrance) was our water-hole, Lebanese House and the after-hours grappa-coffee joints up on Lygon were where we went to put on the nose-bag; Sammy Bears where we got our suits (not really, but that was what we claimed).

Last year I flirted with buying an apartment near the top of the Saville Hotel, the point here being how attractive it has become at night around there with the lighted trees and cafes. I know there's a bogan/drugs reputation to the next block towards Bourke, but Russell Street has come to life and improved out of sight since the Sixties.

Barton Tower will bring the block opposite QV to life too. Thanks again.
 

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After I'd introduced him to these wondrous towers, my brother (as an adolescent) and his friends actually planted a skull and cross-bones on the top of the T&G, rang up the commercial media of the time (I think it was HSV) and sort of got on the news that night when they reported that the "janitor" nearly had a heart-attack trying to get to the flagpole because the lift no-longer worked ...

Part of our history! :)
 

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A couple of great old postcards of Russell Street, enjoy! :)



I can remember going to old the Kings Theatre as a kid before it was replaced by the the Barclay cinema in 1958 and then by the current Greater Union complex in the late 1970s. It was very similar inside to the Athenaeum Theatre still in use on Collins Street albeit larger.


Greater Union Russell Cinemas

Melbourne, Victoria
131 Russell Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 Australia(map)

Status: Open
Screens: Multiplex (6 Screen)
Style: Unknown
Function: Movies (First Run)
Seats: 2588
Chain: Greater Union Theatres
Architect: Ron Monsborough
Firm: Unknown

This is the thrid cinema building built on this site. The first was the 1,376 seat Kings Theatre (1908-1958) a former live theatre that was taken over by Greater Union Cinemas. It was demolished and Greater Union built the 1,054 seat Barclay Cinema which operated from 1958-1976.

The Barclay Cinema was demolished and in its place Greater Union Cinemas built their prestige six screen Greater Union Russell Cinemas. It opened on 23rd November 1978 with Peter Ustinov in "Death on the Nile".

Each auditorium is given a totally different individual decorative scheme, which range from a normal curtained auditorium, one which has bare brick walls, one lined with wood panelled walls and ceiling, one in a Regency style with crystal chandeliers, one in an abstact style and one in a modern style. Seating capacities in the auditoriums are: 546, 272, 418, 252, 358 and 742.

The complex remains open as a popular city centre multi-screen cinema, totally unaltered from its original opening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Main text from Melbourne Architecture

Hero Apartments
(former Russell Street Telephone Exchange and Post Office)
114-120 Russell Street, north-east corner of Russell and Little Collins Streets
1948-54 Commonwealth Dept. of Works
Hammond and Allan (bas-relief sculpture)
1999 Nondas Katsalidis (Hero Apartments conversion)

The first postwar government building of any size completed after 1945, the Russell Street Telephone Exchange and Post Office marks a crucial stylistic shift between pre- and postwar attitudes to the metropolitan public building. Construction took five years, with the result that its interlocking cubic design, projecting glazed panels and cream brick appeared dated when it was finally completed in 1954. Another exchange at 378 Flinders Lane (1952-54) follows a similar compositional palette. Unusually, the Russell Street building combined a postal hall at ground level, the interior design of which echoed 1930s Italian Modernism. A dashing striped floor and outside smart metal grill work, stainless steel telephone booths (since removed), three massive pink granite stylized Doric columns and bas-relief sculpture mounted on the cream brick wall above the footpath were mannered ornamental inclusions beneath large first- and second-floor glazed panels that, in functionalist fashion, revealed the machinery of the exchange within. As the exchange is located on Russell Hill, in 1956 the building gained special status by briefly serving as a relay station for newly arrived television.

In 1999 the building was converted into boutique apartments with retail at ground and basement levels.

How it used to look soon after the original building was completed.



Below, my own shots show the new boutique apartments conversion.



Love the corten steel used in the new upper levels.





 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Text from Melbourne Architecture

Former Russell Street Police Headquarters
336-376 Russell Street, corner LaTrobe Street

Located next door to the 1888 Italianate Police Barracks, the Russel Street Police Headquarters is the central city's most obvious landmark to Percy Everett's career as Chief Architect within the Public Works Department. A Beaux Arts-influenced skyscraper of emphasised vertical orange brick panels and a stepped tower form, this ode to Gotham City was further linked to its New York counterparts with a steel-framed communications tower. Associated for decades with TV police dramas such as 'Homicide' and the symbolic home of Victoria's police force, as well as the site of the infamous Russell Street bombing of 1986.

The police moved out in the 1990s and conversion to apartments (Concept Blue) was completed in 2004 along with an apartment tower to the rear.



Above and below, two old postcards of The Russell Street Police Headquarters.



Below, three shots of my own.





 
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