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I've just learnt that gorilla permit goes from usd 750 to usd 1500... that's cray!
For less than this price (usd 1300), 3 people can board an helico for a 2 h ride around Rwanda.
It's about upmarket tourism and giving more to local communities...
All tourists will shift to DRC or Uganda gorillas instead and locals won't get a dime either...
 

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All tourists will shift to DRC or Uganda gorillas instead and locals won't get a dime either...
DRC: 400 dollars
Uganda: 600 dollars
Rwanda: 1500 dollars

They want to make it a luxury thing and attract only rich people, while leaving normal tourists to neighbouring countries

Morgan Freeman visited last week and even gave an interview



An arrogant move but it's to be seen where this will lead to. It's interesting and the country could end up being visited by many other celebrities, as they prefer not being bothered by "middle class paesants" (while at the same time preaching about climate change and conservation)
 

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I've just learnt that gorilla permit goes from usd 750 to usd 1500... that's cray!
For less than this price (usd 1300), 3 people can board an helico for a 2 h ride around Rwanda.
It's about upmarket tourism and giving more to local communities...
All tourists will shift to DRC or Uganda gorillas instead and locals won't get a dime either...
All of them ? I don't think so.
Half of the mountain gorillas live on the Rwandan side of the parc, so the neighboring countries can not absorb the entirety of the demand.
Plus, the gorillas weren't meant to be a mass tourist attraction to begin with. It's a "nice to have" attraction but nothing where you can cash-in a lot of money.
ORTPN only deliver 32 permits per day, that's a max of 11680 tourists per year.
 
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All of them ? I don't think so.
Half of the mountain gorillas live on the Rwandan side of the parc, so the neighboring countries can not absorb the entirety of the demand.
Plus, the gorillas weren't meant to be a mass tourist attraction to begin with. It's a "nice to have" attraction but nothing where you can cash-in a lot of money.
ORTPN only deliver 32 permits per day, that's a max of 11680 tourists per year.
yes you are right about the idea
how do you find 32 permits per day?

http://www.rdb.rw/tourism-and-conservation/gorilla-trekking.html

Here it says 7 gorilla families that can welcome a group of (max) 8 persons so
7*8*365 = 20440 permits per year.

Am i missing something?


EDIT: on various tour operators websites it does stipulate that "A maximum of 80 gorilla permits are issued per day"... (I presume with 10 gorilla families) which would make 29200 per year.
 

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Women masons working in Kigali

Planning in a grid structure doesn't work in Rwanda.
I mean, look at how steep this street is.
 

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Kigali seen from above

 

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What's the best alternative for neighborhoods built on a hill?
Planning in a grid structure doesn't work in Rwanda.
I mean, look at how steep this street is.
It does work if the site plans take elevation variation into consideration.

As long as they develop in such a way that they prevent landslides and are able to channel excessive runoff, they will be in good shape.
 

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Rwanda National Museum, BUTARE




So many memories are engraved here in this Museum. From Flora to fauna to Rwandan history after independence to memories of Rwandan Genocide. You cant hold tears when u reach this place. Rwandan genocide has been one of the most disastrous events ever to happen in the world. over 1 million lives being lost in only a spin of 2 months. Actually Butare is in Southern Rwanda and holds many museums and memories about the 1994 genocde​
Rwanda and Africa(ns) will prevail.

How do I know, I see the future in its vast history (from beyond the pyramids to its footprint on the entire world to its victorious march across time; it's in us all).
 

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It does work if the site plans take elevation variation into consideration.

As long as they develop in such a way that they prevent landslides and are able to channel excessive runoff, they will be in good shape.
Sure but, what i regret is the fact that the designs never include the most vulnerable user of the streets, the pedestrian, as the default user to design a neighborhood.
And in this case it's just too steep, imagine walking up there with your groceries in hand or being an elderly person walking in those streets.
Urban design must be inclusive.
 

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What's the best alternative for neighborhoods built on a hill?
The rectangular grid can work on the top of the hills but on the sides, streets running up and down the hill must take a diagonal path to make it easy for the users.

So far, the best neighborhood design I've seen about Kigali was by a group of students from Arkansas. It's a very easy scheme to implement when well thought out.
It's culturally, socially, geographically and economically contextualised to the city. Everything in there make sense, nothing is arbitrary.
Here (i think you must know it)

















Here, you can clearly see that the blocks at the bottom have a less stepper elevation variation than the upper blocks. Therefore, streets can run perpendicularly to the hill while on the upper blocks, they run diagonally









 

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The rectangular grid can work on the top of the hills but on the sides, streets running up and down the hill must take a diagonal path to make it easy for the users.

So far, the best neighborhood design I've seen about Kigali was by a group of students from Arkansas. It's a very easy scheme to implement when well thought out.
It's culturally, socially, geographically and economically contextualised to the city. Everything in there make sense, nothing is arbitrary.
Here (i think you must know it)
I think the problem is that they still can't build blocks as the norm
 

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DRC: 400 dollars
Uganda: 600 dollars
Rwanda: 1500 dollars

They want to make it a luxury thing and attract only rich people, while leaving normal tourists to neighbouring countries

Morgan Freeman visited last week and even gave an interview



An arrogant move but it's to be seen where this will lead to. It's interesting and the country could end up being visited by many other celebrities, as they prefer not being bothered by "middle class paesants" (while at the same time preaching about climate change and conservation)
Insane that’s like my whole budget for a holiday this is upperclass for sure locals won’t be able to enjoy the facilities as well
 

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Insane that’s like my whole budget for a holiday this is upperclass for sure locals won’t be able to enjoy the facilities as well
It's working, investors are building what's needed to develop high end tourism, take a look at Bisate Lodge.

There are only fews of these animals, I personally think even 1 visitor is too much.
 
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