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Keltlandia
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
From last Monday to Wednesday, I went sailing to Hilbre Island (off West Kirby) with a friend on his yacht, Ethelred, plus a couple of his friends in their yacht, Barbera Jane. I took the best part of a hundred photos, so I'll just add a selection here..

Liverpool Mariner, where the yachts are moored...




In the lock, leading to the Mersey...




Into the river...




Passing the arena...




Passing the Pier Head...




The Bluecoat Chambers going up in smoke...




New Brighton...




New Brighton Lighthouse...




Leaving Liverpool behind...




Sunset over the Irish Sea...




Hilbre Island...




Ethelred and Barbera Jane, which is deliberately beeched. Didn't stop people thinking assistance was required though.



On Hilbre Island...




Hilbre Island at low tide, where it's possible to walk to the Wirral Penninsula. The island's renowned for people walking from the Wirral, only to get stranded once the tide comes back in.



Spot the seal...




Sailing towards a wind farm in Liverpool Bay, on our way back towards the Mersey...




Back towards the mouth of the Mersey. It just looks like a single coastline, but if you look to the right, you can see the city centre and then the Wirral, as if they are attatched...



A closer look at the mouth of the Mersey. The city centre and New Brighton are clearly visable.
 

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Thanks for posting those pictures - unusual views. Anyone promoting Liverpool as a place to live for those relocating from other parts of the country should make use of Liverpool marina. How many other big British cities have such a facility? I've never been there but it is a great asset. Also seeing that seal picture reminds me of going whale watching off Cape Cod a few years ago. IT's a pity Liverpool doesn't have a whale colony nearby as you can make a killing on boat trips for tourists during the summer months. That;s a financial killing by the way. I;m not advocating harpooning!
 

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Brilliant photos Gareth. It's really interesting to see the city and the Wirral from such unusual angles. Thanks for sharing. :)
 

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I caught a falling star
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Great pictures..

1. How much are these small boats?
2. Can you rent them?
3. Does it take a lot of experience/training to be able take it for a sail?
4. How long does it take to get to Hilbre and back?
5. What sort of weather and conditions is it safe to take a small craft like the Ethelred on the Mersey in?
6. Are you only allowed to venture on the river at certain times or can you stay out there as long as you want?
7. How safe is it/ does it feel safe or a bit hairy given the nature of the estuary?
 

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1. How much are these small boats?
2. Can you rent them?
3. Does it take a lot of experience/training to be able take it for a sail?
Having once owned a Roberts 38' which I named Ah-Ying, I think I am qualified to answer the first three questions. It was an aluminum hulled, ketch rigged boat. She slept five comfortably and seven uncomfortably.:)

Q1. How much are these small boats?
A. A lot of money.

Q2. Can you rent them?
A. Yes, and the best place to rent one is in the BVI. A great vacation.

Q3. Does it take a lot of experience/training to be able to take it for a sail?
A. Not a lot but, if you are going into open waters then you should really know what you are doing and/or have an experienced sailor on board.

I once held dreams of sailing across the Atlantic and up the Mersey, hence the ownership of the Roberts 38'. Circumstances conspired against me but, the dream hasn't completely died. I took lessons in navigation and actually sailed her from Fort Lauderdale to Tortola in the BVI., and spent many a pleasant vacation sailing through the Caribbean. Oh what memories.:)
 

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Liverpool
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I once held dreams of sailing across the Atlantic and up the Mersey, hence the ownership of the Roberts 38'.
Hi Sloyne, i had similar dreams, a wanted to sail from Liverpool down to Southern Spain, i went as far as doing my day-skipper licence but for me that was as far as i got, the dream is still there though, only now we are thinking of buying a cruiser (small one) instead. :)

Excellent pics by the way Gareth. :)
 

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Great photos, looks like a fantastic time to be had sailing, espesh on a sunny day on the Mersey.

I once had a go in one of those single man sailing boats on lake Windermere, where you hang backwards over the edge to stop it tipping over when the wind catches the sail, it's when you start leaning back that the boat suddenly speeds up, was great fun.
 

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Fiat Lux
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Great pictures - especially the Bluecoat fire. Local history in the making.

btw - didn't your momma ever warn you about the dangers of sun and sea?!
 

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Fiat Lux
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Great pictures..

1. How much are these small boats?
2. Can you rent them?
3. Does it take a lot of experience/training to be able take it for a sail?
4. How long does it take to get to Hilbre and back?
5. What sort of weather and conditions is it safe to take a small craft like the Ethelred on the Mersey in?
6. Are you only allowed to venture on the river at certain times or can you stay out there as long as you want?
7. How safe is it/ does it feel safe or a bit hairy given the nature of the estuary?
You would need a Royal Yachting Association qualification to hire a boat and sail it into the river. How long it takes to get anywhere depends on prevailing winds, tides and type of sailing craft. You should be able to get to Hilbre Island in about 2 - 3+ hours depending on wind factor, route taken, experience of the crew etc. The strength of the wind and tide level, combined with your experience determines whether or not you can take a small yacht out. Sailing alone in the Mersey and Liverpool Bay requires an abiltity to read navigational charts because of the presence of sandbanks etc. Sailing is safe but like anything else you quickly become unstuck if you stray beyond your ability to handle things.
 

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Hi Sloyne, i had similar dreams, a wanted to sail from Liverpool down to Southern Spain, i went as far as doing my day-skipper licence but for me that was as far as i got, the dream is still there though, only now we are thinking of buying a cruiser (small one) instead.
And the dream never fades. Good luck and I hope you make it.:)
 

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Keltlandia
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Great pictures..

1. How much are these small boats?
2. Can you rent them?
3. Does it take a lot of experience/training to be able take it for a sail?
4. How long does it take to get to Hilbre and back?
5. What sort of weather and conditions is it safe to take a small craft like the Ethelred on the Mersey in?
6. Are you only allowed to venture on the river at certain times or can you stay out there as long as you want?
7. How safe is it/ does it feel safe or a bit hairy given the nature of the estuary?
Points 1, 2 & 3 are not things I'm clued up about, but some forumers have answered pretty much in the way I would imagine.

4. We left Liverpool Mariner at 6:30pm and arrived near Hilbre Island at about 10:30pm, making it four hours, however, I was told that such a time was longer than the norm, as we had the wind against us for much of the journey. I think you can get, perhaps, an hour or so off that time, in the right conditions.

5. We were out in mild conditions, so the weather was no problem, apart from the sun, which gave me sunburn. In such small crafts, you feel every wave, but I never felt like the boat was going to capsize or anything. The boat did tend to get knocked about quite a bit when caught in the slipstream of a much larger vessel, many of which were much quicker than us and would be overtaking us before we realised it was behind us. What I would say is don't eat or drink too much, particularly fizzy drinks, or your stomach will punish you. I think it would be only in the most extreme of weather that the coast guard would stop small ships from sailing out.

6. You can stay out as long as you want. We were going to come back in on the Tuesday but ended up staying out until Wednesday. The folks at the marina like to be informed as to when to expect your return, so we had to call them to inform them that we were staying out longer. The mariner itself has certain time windows for vessels to come back in, or go out. For example, you can't come back and then radio them at 3 in the morning to let you back in. You're either in or out for the night.

7. Pretty much like in point 5. We got knocked about a bit, but the ship's designed to cope with much rougher weather, being a long distance racing yacht. I never felt in mortal danger at any point, though perhaps a bit fragile. :)
 

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I caught a falling star
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Points 1, 2 & 3 are not things I'm clued up about, but some forumers have answered pretty much in the way I would imagine.

4. We left Liverpool Meriner at 6:30pm and arrived near Hilbre Island at about 10:30pm, making it four hours, however, I was told that such a time was longer than the norm, as we had the wind against us for much of the journey. I think you can get, perhaps, an hour or so off that time, in the right conditions.

5. We were out in mild conditions, so the weather was no problem, apart from the sun, which gave me sunburn. In such small crafts, you feel every wave, but I never felt like the boat was going to capsize or anything. The boat did tend to get knocked about quite a bit when caught in the slipstream of a much larger vessel, many of which were much quicker than us and would be overtaking us before we realised it was behind us. What I would say is don't eat or drink too much, particularly fizzy drinks, or your stomach will punish you. I think it would be only in the most extreme of weather that the coast guard would stop small ships from sailing out.

6. You can stay out as long as you want. We were going to come back in on the Tuesday but ended up staying out until Wednesday. The folks at the arena like to be informed as to when to expect your return, so we had to call them to inform them that we were staying out longer. The mariner itself has certain time windows for vessels to come back in, or go out. For example, you can't come back and then radio them at 3 in the morning to let you back in. You're either in or out for the night.

7. Pretty much like in point 5. We got knocked about a bit, but the ship's designed to cope with much rougher weather, being a long distance racing yacht. I never fault in mortal danger at any point, though perhaps a bit fragile. :)
That's fantastic. Those photos have really got me thinking about this whole sailing lark (again).

What did you do at 10:30 at night on Hilbre Island? Did you camp out?

Is sailing at night a viable option in these boats? Do you have radar/electronic navigation systems on board?

Are boats, such as the one you were in, just for shallow, coastal waters or is it possible to head out in them?

Excuse all the questions Gart, I'm as fascinated as I am utterly uninformed about all of this sort of thing.
 

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I caught a falling star
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You would need a Royal Yachting Association qualification to hire a boat and sail it into the river. How long it takes to get anywhere depends on prevailing winds, tides and type of sailing craft. You should be able to get to Hilbre Island in about 2 - 3+ hours depending on wind factor, route taken, experience of the crew etc. The strength of the wind and tide level, combined with your experience determines whether or not you can take a small yacht out. Sailing alone in the Mersey and Liverpool Bay requires an abiltity to read navigational charts because of the presence of sandbanks etc. Sailing is safe but like anything else you quickly become unstuck if you stray beyond your ability to handle things.
Have you done some sailing Baboo?

I've always wanted to know how deep the deepest channels of the Mersey are at both high and low tides- or for that matter how shallow the shallower parts are at high tide. Wonder if anyone knows?
 

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I caught a falling star
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Has anyone (not on here, I'm not expecting that!) ever managed to swim across the Mersey? Is it possible?
 

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Yes vt you can swim the Mersey,it was in the echo a while back, you have about a 40 minute window at slack water?the swimmers that did it went from near the arena over to monks ferry on the other side.
 

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Keltlandia
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That's fantastic. Those photos have really got me thinking about this whole sailing lark (again).

What did you do at 10:30 at night on Hilbre Island? Did you camp out?

Is sailing at night a viable option in these boats? Do you have radar/electronic navigation systems on board?

Are boats, such as the one you were in, just for shallow, coastal waters or is it possible to head out in them?

Excuse all the questions Gart, I'm as fascinated as I am utterly uninformed about all of this sort of thing.
We stayed on the ship at night. Well, actually, we all sat in the Barbera Jane, which has a much larger cabin, had some food for tea and a few cans. Then we went to sleep. It wasn't until the next day that we went onto Hilbre Island. We deliberately left Barbera Jane quite close to the Hilbre Coast, so that it would beach, once the tide went out. After that, we merely climber out of the boat and onto the beach. There's not much on Hilbre Island mind, although there are a few houses that people actually live in.

We didn't have any navigation systems. The guy who owns Barbera Jane had done the journey before, so knew the way. Besides, the route is merely to go around the Wirral Penninsula. However, there is some sort of navigation system on the water involving navigational buoys. These buoys appear every so often, with the next and previous ones still insight, so you can follow the line. They mark paths, such as the Queens Channel, with the buoys numbered in evens ie Q1, Q3, Q5 etc. I'm not sure why they increment in twos, but I think they relate to some type of distance measurement. Like I said though, they were close enough so that you could see the next one along in the distance. The buoys also have blinking green lights at night, though there are also red ones, which I think marked things such as shallow water etc, so stay close to the green ones but avoid the red ones. We sailed in the dark on the way, as the sun went down about an hour before our arrival at Hilbre, but the buoys and the streetlights on the Wirral meant we weren't disorientated.

You can go into the sea with yachts, so long as you know what you're doing. My uncle and his friend sailed to the Isle of Man and back in a similar vessel several years ago. Speaking of water depth, we did have a depth gauge on board, which helped you when deciding how much chain to throw our when anchoring, or how close to the coast you may go, without scraping the bottom. The deepest waters seemed to be about 15 metres, in parts of Liverpool Bay.
 

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We stayed on the ship at night. Well, actually, we all sat in the Barbera Jane, which has a much larger cabin, had some food for tea and a few cans. Then we went to sleep. It wasn't until the next day that we went onto Hilbre Island. We deliberately left Barbera Jane quite close to the Hilbre Coast, so that it would beach, once the tide went out. After that, we merely climber out of the boat and onto the beach. There's not much on Hilbre Island mind, although there are a few houses that people actually live in.

We didn't have any navigation systems. The guy who owns Barbera Jane had done the journey before, so knew the way. Besides, the route is merely to go around the Wirral Penninsula. However, there is some sort of navigation system on the water involving navigational buoys. These buoys appear every so often, with the next and previous ones still insight, so you can follow the line. They mark paths, such as the Queens Channel, with the buoys numbered in evens ie Q1, Q3, Q5 etc. I'm not sure why they increment in twos, but I think they relate to some type of distance measurement. Like I said though, they were close enough so that you could see the next one along in the distance. The buoys also have blinking green lights at night, though there are also red ones, which I think marked things such as shallow water etc, so stay close to the green ones but avoid the red ones. We sailed in the dark on the way, as the sun went down about an hour before our arrival at Hilbre, but the buoys and the streetlights on the Wirral meant we weren't disorientated.

You can go into the sea with yachts, so long as you know what you're doing. My uncle and his friend sailed to the Isle of Man and back in a similar vessel several years ago. Speaking of water depth, we did have a depth gauge on board, which helped you when deciding how much chain to throw our when anchoring, or how close to the coast you may go, without scraping the bottom. The deepest waters seemed to be about 15 metres, in parts of Liverpool Bay.
anorak warning:
You'll find Q2 Q4 etc on the other beam somewhere. From a sailing boat you'd be too low in the water to see them easily.
Red and Green have meaning. IN the US it's red-right-returning, in the civilised world its the other way around. So the red would be on your right (starboard) going out, and the green on your left (port). Coming back it would be the other way around. OK sailor?:lol:
 
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