Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I won't lie this isn't a great development, especially if it turns out like the rest of the Salamanca Square development, but I saw this underconstruction near where I work and thought what the hell we have threads for shorter buildings.

From Skyscraper News:





This looks like a previous design


Located here:


Architect BUJ Architects
Developer Berkeley Homes PLC
* The building will be clad in oxidised steel and copper.
* It is only six metres away from the neighbouring Salamander Square.









Salamanca Square on the left is built entirely from lego.


9 Albert Embankment, the first part of the development I think, it was a 60s office block in a prior life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,913 Posts
Saw this on the train from Waterloo. Truely horrible the way its been shoe horned into such a small site. Its right next to the previous phase of the development & will totally block almost all natural light getting into most of the already built building.
 

·
BLAND
Joined
·
8,868 Posts
Its difficult to make this area any worse than it is
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,464 Posts
truly terrible. This space should of been allocated for a small green space now all the apartments are so close together I can't imagine 'light and airy' apartments being on the list of selling points!
 

·
flippi1
Joined
·
50 Posts
i quite like it we almost bought one of the flats when the first phase went on the market in spring 06 was 2 bedroom but only 650sqft so changed mind . I think the high density housing on the south bank is a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Salamanca Tower - Great architecture is built

Point taken about reduced sunlight to flats in the existing square to the west of the tower.

However, this tower is going to be one hell of a landmark with magnificient views for the tower residents! The east facing aspect spans from St. Pauls to Battersea Power Station while the west facing aspect spans the river from Westminster to Battersea power station.

Roof terrace views












 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Salamanca Place - What's in a name?

A clip from Wikipedia about Salamanca Place.

Salamanca is the name used loosely to describe areas or activities associated with Salamanca Place in Hobart, capital city of the Australian state of Tasmania.

Was this the real inspiration for Salamanca Tower, Albert Embankment?

Wrest Point Hotel Casino in Salamanca Place Tasmania. The site was originally a hotel that was called the Wrest Point Riviera, built by Arthur Drysdale and opened in 1939



Salamanca Place itself consists of rows of sandstone buildings, formerly warehouses for the port of Hobart Town that have since been converted into restaurants, galleries, craft shops and offices. It was named after the victory in 1812 of the Duke of Wellington in the Battle of Salamanca in the Spanish province of Salamanca. It was previously called "The Cottage Green".

Interestingly, Salamanca Place, London SE1 shares the same history with it's namesake in Tasmania. After the Battle of Salamanca, the Black Prince, the Duke of Wellington, supplied the Spanish province with pottery from Lambeth potteries. Coincidentally, In 1815 John Doulton invested his savings in a small Lambeth pothouse. His listed building in Black Prince Road which is adjacent to Salamance Place lays testimony to his success.

View of Salamanca Tower, Salamanca Place SE1 from the east side of the railway viaduct.





An interesting clip from Museum of London Archaeology Society (MOLAS)

The major land use at the site was represented by features associated with Doulton's pot manufactory, known at the site from c. 1890 to 1923. The site was sold in 1923. Five pottery kilns were recorded. There were two phases of use: two kilns were out of use by the time of the construction of the final three. All the kilns had circular bases and were of the downdraft type, with an exit flue leading out towards a chimney. Two chimney bases survived. The flues were backfilled with a mixture of whole pots (mainly stoneware bottles) kiln shelves, kiln furniture, refractory bricks (mainly made by Cowen, of the type used in the kiln construction) and other debris including unfired clay and glaze. The kiln shelves bore splashes of glaze (as did the kilns and walls of the flues) and circular shadows, left after the removal of the product being fired. The shadows corresponded exactly with the size of stoneware bottles recovered from the site. The glaze seen as splashes was the same as that coating the bottles. A series of flues linking with a chimney were recorded at the south of the site. The deposit within these flues suggested this was a colour preparation area. First-hand evidence for the manufacturing process at Doulton's Lambeth works is unique: no similar stoneware manufactory has been excavated in the UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Salamanca Place - A place of pots and mystery

Was it Jack the Ripper?

July 13, 1902.

The Lambeth horror has taken its place as a new chapter in the great volume of London's mysteries. The mutilated remains of

The Woman Deposited in Salamanca-place

in the early hours of the morning have not been identified. It is possible they never will be.

In these matters there is a tendency, after a certain point of unsuccess is reached, to relax effort. The finding of a dead body under ordinary circumstances is quite a common feature of London's daily life. There is a certain Thames-side district photographer who is specially retained by the police authorities to photograph the unknown dead. Rarely a day passes without his having a subject for his camera, and frequently he is as busy as the staff of a West End studio on an evening of Court presentations.

Public attention has been attracted in the case of the Salamanca-place sensation by the fact that some portions of the remains had been boiled and roasted. This gave an extra gruesomeness to the ordinary

'Dead Body Found"

announcement which may be seen outside almost every police-station in the metropolis all the year round. If the authorities thought it worth while to spend money and time, they might eventually get at the identity of the woman by the same process of exhaustion which enabled them at last to know the real name and address of Jack the Ripper.

In that case they had reduced the only possible Jacks to seven, then by a further exhaustive inquiry to three, and were about to fit these three people's movements in with the dates of the various murders when the one and only genuine Jack saved further trouble by being found drowned in the Thames, into which he had flung himself, a raving lunatic, after the last and most appalling mutilation of the whole series.

But prior to this discovery the name of the man found drowned was bracketed with two others as

A Possible Jack

and the police were in search of him alive when they found him dead. In the case of this chopped-up and semi-cooked woman, the best clue to the murderer might be the establishment of the victim's identity.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top