SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Meet the Kensington Tower, the high-rise that would join Utah’s tallest buildings in Salt Lake City’s skyline

Salt Lake City’s skyline is primed to change rapidly in the coming decade, and a Boston-based real estate development group wants to build the tallest building in it.
Kensington Tower would add luxury rental apartments at the corner of State Street and 200 South, replacing a fast-food restaurant and large parking lot with a “vertical urban community” that the developers say would fill an unmet need for high-end, luxury rentals in the capital city.
At 39 stories and over 400 feet, the Kensington Tower would inject 380 units into the core of Downtown, across from the Gallivan Center on a site that’s currently home to a fast-food restaurant.
Its lead architect and backers say they aren’t focused on the title of being the tallest building on Salt Lake’s changing skyline, just shy of the state’s tallest. Instead, they say the Kensington would fill an unmet need in Salt Lake City.
“We feel like this housing will really help Salt Lake City,” said Emir Tursic, Associate Principal and Senior Vice President at HKS Architects, the firm that’s designing the new building.
The developers are presenting the concept as a residential development that might attract high earners who are looking for city living in the heart of downtown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·


300,000 SF
377 units
39 total stories + roof terrace
Estimated groundbreaking—Summer 2021
Estimated completion—Fall 2024.
Owner, Developer—Kensington Investment Company
Architect—HKS Architects
GC—Jacobsen Construction

High-rise architects are asked to provide high-density spaces that address environmental sustainability, amenity, and resiliency concerns.
In an era of urban renaissance, downtown developments are challenged to do more with less. In addition to providing high-density, amenity-rich housing, high-rise architects must minimize the carbon footprint of their projects while also designing for resiliency.

“Air quality is the threat that affects us [in Salt Lake City]—we do whatever we can to reduce the carbon footprint,”

Kensington Tower, the 600,000 SF, 40-story residential building currently in design that will be located at the corner of State Street and 200 South.

March’s earthquake reinforced this idea of sustainability, building upon a concept that HKS was already exploring with Kensington Tower, namely Performance-based Design. “We are doing site-specific seismic design instead of following prescriptive code requirements. We’re looking at the soil that the building will be on and designing to a maximum credible earthquake and customizing the structural design to meet that.”
Source: https://www.behance.net/gallery/1060...t-Lake-City-UT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Kensington files a site development permit. https://citizenportal.slcgov.com/Cit...howInspection=

Quote:

The scope of work for this site development permit consists of public and private utility work and associated infrastructure in the public right of way, as well as the installation of shoring, for a 372 unit, mixed-use, high-rise apartment building.

[email protected]P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
I really really want to believe this is going to happen, but I'm scared to totally trust in it. This is a huge deal for the skyline and I don't want to build false hope.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top