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Hines, the international real estate firm, today revealed preliminary details for the four development components coming to the PG&E site, encompassing a full city block in downtown San Francisco between Market and Mission Street. 50 Main, the planned multifamily component, joins the previously announced 200 Mission office tower redevelopment, historic complex renovation and new 1.25-acre park to complete Hines’ vision for the entire block. 50 Main will consist of approximately 800 apartments – including 20.5% affordable apartments. Upon completion, the combined projects will reimagine and breathe new life into an irreplaceable, transit-oriented location that spans an entire city block.

Rising 85 stories and standing at 1,066 feet tall, the multifamily tower will offer a variety of studio, one- and two-bedroom floorplans for rent at both market and affordable rates. Residents will experience a connection to nature with excellent access to light and air, a host of shared amenities, and direct access to the new park at the ground floor level while enjoying immediate access to multiple city transit services.



 

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whitest boy in the delta
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oh wow, pretty big project! San Francisco's skyline growing further. Love the city, been there maybe 5-10 times when I was working in California and always had a lovely time, it's nice to see the skyline growing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It strongly reminds me of this Foster design for a residential building in Chelsea.






 

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Earthquakes, sinking and wind: Here’s what it takes to build a skyscraper in S.F.
1,000-foot ‘supertall’ tower proposed for downtown



Here in earthquake country, we prefer our high-rises not to sink or tilt. So, the more Millennium Tower settled into soft bay landfill, the more unsettled San Franciscans became.

Yet even as Millennium undergoes an expensive, complex foundation fix, a developer has proposed the tallest tower of the post-sinkage era — and it’s eager to share the engineering techniques it will employ to avoid a similar fate.

In December, the Houston-based developer Hines unveiled plans for a 1,066 foot apartment building at 50 Main Street that would be just four feet shorter than nearby Salesforce Tower, The City’s tallest structure. The Foster + Partners-designed supertall tower — a technical designation for buildings higher than 300 meters — would be the centerpiece of the redevelopment of the full downtown block that hosted PG&E’s headquarters until last year.
“We’re still in the formative stages of design,” says Ron Klemencic, whose firm, Magnusson Klemencic Associates (MKA), is the lead structural engineer on the project. “But there’s no question about what the foundation will be. We’re going to be on large diameter drilled shafts that extend roughly about 250 feet down to bedrock.” That technique, Klemencic says, should essentially eliminate the potential for sinking.

The roughly 40 drilled shafts, also called caissons, that will support the tower will be between six and eight feet in diameter and filled with reinforced concrete. Rather than standing on bedrock, the caissons will “socket” into it at a depth between 10 and 30 feet. The same technique was used in other recent downtown high-rises, including Salesforce Tower, Park Tower, and the stalled Oceanwide Center project. Klemencic and his firm worked on all of those buildings and more — “with one notable exception,” he adds. “We had nothing to do with Millennium Tower,” whose foundation does not reach to bedrock. (Though it has sunk and tilted a few inches, Millennium Tower is considered safe by structural engineers and city officials.)
 

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