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The typical pattern is that early Chinese immigrants (which were relatively few in LA) settled in urban "Chinatowns" but later immigrants moved to the more well-to-do suburbs (same sort of pattern in the Bay Area and NY).

The SGV has the advantage of being mostly separate cities, which are better maintained due to being outside the LA city limits. School districts in particular, which are really quite bad in LA, encourage parents with an interest in their children's education to move into other areas, and most Asians are strongly focused on education. The SFV unfortunately is almost entirely LAUSD.

See also the OC, where the densest Chinese population is in places like Irvine, which have excellent schools and very well run city services.
I understand now, many of the Chinese population do not want to live in the San Fernando Valley is because of a bad school district, poor city government, and bad infrastructure. Asians want good schools, infrastructure, and city government since they rely on education.
 

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Discussion Starter · #382 ·
I understand now, many of the Chinese population do not want to live in the San Fernando Valley is because of a bad school district, poor city government, and bad infrastructure. Asians want good schools, infrastructure, and city government since they rely on education.
Historical reasons.

The history of the San Gabriel Valley, like so much of the American West included Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and south Asian settlers and pioneers in the mid-19th century. These Asian settlers worked the fields of grapes, citrus fruits, and other crops. They were also involved in the construction of the infrastructure of San Gabriel Valley.[6] This major hub, a main cultural center is an area with many suburban cities just east of Los Angeles, is an "Asian Pacific American phenomenon".[6] Given the San Gabriel Valley's rapidly increasing population of Asian-Americans (largely Chinese-Americans), several business districts were developed to serve their needs.[7] Since the 1970s, most Chinese immigrants in Los Angeles Area have preferred these "Ethnic Suburbs" mainly in the San Gabriel Valley, instead of the touristy old "New Chinatown".[8] Chinese Americans are actually a very complex sub-population. Rather than solely being a significant Chinese American cultural center, the area is a hub of much more extensive "multigenerational and multiethnic Asian American diversity." [6] Of the ten cities in the United States with the highest proportions of Chinese-Americans, the top eight are located in the San Gabriel Valley.[6] As the Chinatown in Los Angeles changes, some residents have moved and businesses from Los Angeles' Chinatown and have opened branches in the San Gabriel Valley area.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_enclaves_in_the_San_Gabriel_Valley
 

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Historical reasons if you mean from the 1970's, when the new wave of well educated immigration started. The earlier waves did largely come to LA as witnessed by Chinatown, Little Tokyo, Filipinotown, anywhere to get a job. The new wave had choices and wanted a better place to live, especially schools and public safety.

Very much the same pattern in the Bay Area and NY: the first generation was poor and came for whatever job they could find (still many of those coming, often illegally). The educated groups went to the suburbs with the best schools, whether it's Arcadia, Irvine, Diamond Bar, Cupertino, Palo Alto or wherever.
 

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Then, why didn't they settle in the San Fernando Valley in the first place?
I don't feel like checking the history, but I would guess the first large Asian group in SoCal was the Japanese who were largely focused on agriculture. When they came, the nearest available agricultural land was on the west side and in the SGV (the center of LA was downtown then). The SFV was still relatively remote.

Chinese came to SoCal in much smaller numbers (most went to the Bay Area)and were focused on Chinatown in downtown LA.
 

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I don't feel like checking the history, but I would guess the first large Asian group in SoCal was the Japanese who were largely focused on agriculture. When they came, the nearest available agricultural land was on the west side and in the SGV (the center of LA was downtown then). The SFV was still relatively remote.

Chinese came to SoCal in much smaller numbers (most went to the Bay Area)and were focused on Chinatown in downtown LA.
They should have went north to the San Fernando Valley and continue their agriculture there.
 

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There are more Koreans in the SFV. For some reason despite being successful Koreans are more likely to send their kinds to LA public schools.
True and kind of interesting.

The Asians in the SGV are mostly direct arrivals with no prior historical attachments whereas the SFV Koreans tend to be established Ktown families now heading for the suburbs. They mostly go to Granada Hills, Northridge and the like, where the schools are quite strong. It could also be that there are better business opportunities in the SFV, since the SGV is so strongly Chinese.

There was an article in the Times about Koreans who move one parent and kids to the US specifically to go to US schools, which gives you a big advantage in Korea (language, familiarity with US culture, emphasis on independent thinking and creativity).
 

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Hotel In-Fills in the SGV

Current progress of the new 5-story Residence Inn by Marriott extended stay (144 rooms) in Pasadena, CA.

Pics taken 13 Aug 2015.

Looking south across the 134 fwy.



Fair Oaks Ave. exit off 210 fwy eastbound.
 

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Pasadena Hyatt Place Hotel & Mixed-Use project picking up pace at Paseo Colorado (Macy's).

8/18/2015





8/20/2015

 

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Pasadena’s general plan focuses on new downtown housing, development

By Jason Henry, San Gabriel Valley Tribune
POSTED: 08/23/15, 7:54 PM PDT

The Pasadena of the future may not have flying cars or jetpacks, but city officials hope it’ll have plenty of feet on the ground.

The city has approved a road map for Pasadena’s development over the next 20 years that focuses most of the future housing, retail and office space in the city’s core in hopes of making the city more walkable.

“We’re going to keep development where it belongs, downtown and near the light rail stations,” said Councilwoman Margaret McAustin. “I think this amount of growth will allow us to be an economically strong city, but it won’t negatively impact our neighborhoods — it’ll preserve our character.”

The general plan update emphasizes more infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians, while keeping increases in density away from the city’s iconic tree-lined neighborhoods. About 60 percent of the new housing and 40 percent of the non-residential space allowed is in the central district, which encompasses Old Pasadena, according to a staff report.

“It tries to find a kind of happy middle ground that will keep Pasadena, Pasadena but will also allow us to embrace a certain amount of growth and change,” said Mayor Terry Tornek. “The average person in a single-family neighborhood isn’t going to see any change in his neighborhood.”

The city set development caps that should keep the pace similar to the city’s growth over the last 20 years, Tornek said. Officials estimate a modest population increase of about 20,000 people by 2035.

“The model of development over the last 20 years is what is planned for the next 20,” said City Manager Michael Beck. “We’re not projecting rapid of aggressive population growth.”

Some, however, say limiting development through caps will hold Pasadena back.

“Unfortunately, they have pushed the numbers down to a level that just doesn’t make sense economically,” said Paul Little, president of the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce. “There’s a lot of interest in companies and people relocating to Pasadena and if there is no adequate space for that, then we’re going to be revisiting the general plan fairly soon.”

Ideally, Little said he would like to see no cap on the amount of construction, but rather a system where each project could receive a review based on how it fits with the city.

“That’s the 21st century approach,” he said.

By setting a low limit, the council will likely have to go back to the drawing board in the next 10 years, rather than 20, he said.

Some areas, like South Fair Oaks, will see more dramatic changes than others. The updated plan allows for mixed-use properties near the Gold Line’s Fillmore Station, where previously the zoning was only commercial, Beck said.

The city expects the higher density in the downtown and on South Fair Oaks will encourage more people to walk, bike or ride public transportation. Part of the plan calls for more infrastructure to meet that anticipated demand. Union Street, Cordova Street and Orange Grove Boulevard will receive upgrades that officials hope will cut down on vehicular traffic. Union Street, for example, will get a separated bicycle track that eliminates one of street’s three lanes.

The general plan also added protections for certain neighborhoods by classifying them as “historic,” such as the communities surrounding North Lake Avenue, according to Councilman Victor Gordo.

Marsha Rood, Pasadena’s former development administrator and a Downtown Pasadena Neighborhood Association Board Member, called the plan “extremely well done.”

“We’re going to grow where we can grow,” she said, noting that she expects Pasadena to build “up.” She calls it compact development, rather than density. She said she sees elevators, not cars as the vehicle of Pasadena’s future, with residents traveling to street level and then walking for their shopping and restaurants.

According to Mayor Tornek, the passage of the general plan — six years in the making — is only the first step. Now, the city has to turn the broad vision of the general plan into regulations.

“There’s a couple of years worth of work ahead, but at least we’ve taken the first giant step,” he said.
http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/gov...n-focuses-on-new-downtown-housing-development
 

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Discussion Starter · #396 ·


A big congratulations to the Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority, which today announced the substantial completion of construction of the 11.5-mile project that extends the Gold Line from eastern Pasadena to the Azusa/Glendora border. ‘Substantial completion’ means the project is ready for use with only a few small tasks — basically clean-up items — to be done.

The Construction Authority is the independent agency charged with building the project. With construction basically done, the Authority will begin the process of handing over the project to Metro. In turn, Metro can then begin pre-revenue service — i.e. further testing and employee training. We don’t have an opening date yet, but Metro has budgeted for the project to open in the first half of 2016.
http://thesource.metro.net/2015/09/...construction-of-gold-line-foothill-extension/
 

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Some updates from Monterey Park...







The Atlantic Gateway Courtyard by Marriott is a six-story, 288-room hotel with ancillary retail space situated on a 2.14-acre site located on the southwest corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Hellman Avenue. The hotel is just off of the San Bernardino Freeway (10 FWY) providing easy access for travelers. The 210,390 square foot project will include two subterranean parking levels containing 351 spaces, along with 14 surface-level spaces providing adequate off-street parking.

The architectural style of this hotel is contemporary with some traditional elements giving the hotel a timeless appearance. The building mass will be articulated with architectural elements, such as a porte-cochere, wall off-sets, and recessed windows and entries. The building design features the use of smooth stucco, precast concrete, metal canopy panel system and spandrels.

The primary focal feature of the hotel is the decorative porte-cochere that greats hotel guests, along with an outdoor terrace area at the corner of the property and along the northeasterly portion of Atlantic Boulevard encouraging outdoor gathering. A second floor pool deck is provided including a pool, spa, a decorative water feature, outdoor seating, wood benches with trellis canopies, a fire pit, outdoor bar, shaded cabanas, and outdoor media and T.V. lounge.
http://www.montereypark.ca.gov/1055/Courtyard-By-Marriott-Hotel





The AG Hotel is a six-story, 148 room boutique hotel including an additional 98 apartment units in a mixed-use format situated on a 2.1-acre site located on the southwest corner of North Atlantic Boulevard and West Garvey Avenue. The 192,385 square foot project includes two-separate restaurant spaces, the first on the ground floor and the other on the top floor providing views northerly toward the San Gabriel Mountains, retail space, five floors for the hotel and apartments and adequate off-street parking.

The architectural style of the boutique hotel is modern. The hotel is oriented towards the intersection of Atlantic Boulevard and Garvey Avenue taking full advantage of this central location within the city. The building design features the use of smooth stucco, stone veneer, horizontal wood slats, frameless clear glass accented with canvas awnings, and privacy green walls.

The apartment units will be one and two-bedroom units ranging in size from 640 to 1,350 square feet. The primary focal feature of the project will be the corner terrace with decorative raised planter walls. The project amenities include a lounge deck, pool with spa, fire pit, outdoor furniture, and decorative exterior lighting.
http://www.montereypark.ca.gov/1047/AG-Hotel

Along with Pasadena's new hotels under construction and the hotels yet to break ground on Valley Blvd in the city of San Gabriel, the SGV is poised for more economic growth - especially in the tourism industry. That growth will eventually spur further residential construction already in place, in particular infill mixed-use projects.

I drive by Pasadena often and the Macy's building at the Colorado Paseo Mall is already under demolition for a new Hyatt Hotel and mixed-use project. Lots of construction out there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #400 ·

Triple Crown-winning horse trained by La Cañada Flintridge, California's Bob Baffert claims racing Grand Slam with victory in final race at Breeders' Cup.

American Pharoah stands alone after Breeders' Cup Classic triumph

He had already won the Triple Crown. No horse had done that in 37 years, going back to the legendary Affirmed in 1978. Being one of those 12, American Pharoah was already legendary. But thanks to horse racing's creation of this annual tap-into-Fort-Knox gathering, this year's worth $26 million over two days, American Pharoah had the opportunity for a cherry on his whipped cream.

The Breeders' Cup began in 1984, so this was the first chance for a Triple Crown winner to double down. American Pharoah did so, by a dazzling 6 1/2 lengths.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-breeders-cup-dwyre-20151101-column.html
 
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