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The geometry problem comes from where to put the cars at the end of the tunnel. They need to at least stop to load/unload passengers. That’s ok if you only need to unload a few 100 cars an hour, but that’s not exactly mass transit. To approach BART or even light rail capacities you would have to have massive underground loading/unloading zones which would be as expensive or more than equivalent rail stations. For reference, BART carries 28k passengers per hour into SF in the transbay tube and is planning for even more. That’s 8 passengers per second.

If you think the cars are going to spill out of the tunnel onto surface streets then you have the 2d geometry problem and this idea is no better than an underground freeway. We have those already and they don’t really solve the problem.
Well, let me put it this way so that you understand how BART works:

BART in itself operates with 4- to 10-car sets, in which you have the flexibility to build any number of consists based on demand. If we will need 10-car trains all day, then you will get the following:

Weekdays (at 15-minute intervals)

Line​
Minimum Length​
Minimum Number of Train Cars per hour​
Maximum Length​
Maximum Number of Train Cars per hour​
Orange (Richmond-Santa Clara)
4​
32​
10​
80​
Green (Daly City-Santa Clara)
4​
32​
10​
80​
Totals
64​
160​

Saturdays (at 20-minute intervals)

Line​
Minimum Length​
Minimum Number of Train Cars per hour​
Maximum Length​
Maximum Number of Train Cars per hour​
Orange (Richmond-Santa Clara)
4​
24​
10​
60​
Green (Daly City-Santa Clara)
5​
30​
10​
60​
Totals
54​
120​

For Sundays, only get the Orange Line figures for Saturdays.

Most of the time, the Orange Line gets between 4- and 8-car trains all day, every day, including weekends, with a typical train consist being 6 cars. If the Orange Line runs 10-car trains, it'd usually indicate there is a large event coming up that day, perhaps at SAP Center, Oakland Coliseum, or San Francisco where longer trains are necessary.

Basically, the platform lengths are not really the issue, per se; the real issue here lies with platform and train capacities. I'd imagine that, if BART and the VTA get things right with connections and promotions, you can see a flood of visitors spending more time at SAP Center and workers using BART as a shuttle between Downtown and Diridon, supplementing services provided by the VTA on Santa Clara Street. At the same time, the VTA can give BART opportunities to better link the two systems by providing easy connections to Santa Clara LR stations (at City Hall/Downtown) and Diridon Station (for Amtrak, ACE, and Caltrain).
 

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Downtown SJ development focus only please
Understandable. However, BART is part of Downtown's future development, in which its presence can radically transform its landscape in the long-term. So I elect to keep it in the conversation as transportation will always be a critical issue in any community's overall development.
 

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thesanjoseblog.com
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1,140 Posts
exactly. Boring company is glossing over lots of infrastructure and regulatory costs. There is no way a tunnel for Tesla’s will cost less than a tunnel for highway cars:
  • Ventilation is technology agnostic. Air must be exhausted from both sides of an accident at all locations and new air supplied. Similarly emergency evacuation tunnels are required with their own air supply. All this emergency infrastructure is a critical element for any public system (See BART fight over single bore).
  • EV actually require special fire suppression since lithium fires can not be extinguished by water. Additionally fumes from chemical fires can be especially toxic.
  • Utilities are very congested underground (~5’ to 50’) which is one of the major costs for tunneling, specifically when the tunnels connect to the surface (aka single bore vs twin bore discussion). Avoiding utilities requires buying land outside the right of way... which costs money.
  • Let’s also not forget accessibility and maintenance. Elevators and escalators break often and cost a lot, especially when exposed to the elements (ask BART). Neither are allowed as emergency egress... so you still need to add stairs (lots). Vehicle elevators are even more costly to maintain.
  • Autonomous vehicles are possible with any technology (See Copenhagen metro and BART Oakland airport connector) but it’s implementation is a political question due to union power. Both Disneyland monorail and BART were designed to run autonomously in the 60s... It’s nothing new. It’s use is political not technological.
It’s very true that this is apples vs oranges discussion. Elon is a great inventor and Tesla has made me money but promotional material always has disclaimers in small print for a reason. Existing technology has a known list of challenges and cost, theoretical experimental technology has unknown challenges and costs (Highway capacity limits and sprawl effects took decades to be acknowledged. Hyperloop... aren’t we still waiting for an actual running system?) This is no different than the county’s 1960 discussion of public transit vs expressways. The expressways are a wonderful example of wishful thinking (Link)

At the most basic level, the proposed systems save cost by building smaller infrastructure with reduced capacity (fewer tracks, smaller tunnels, smaller vehicles). Boring company goes further by potentially offering (not guaranteed) off-the-shelf vehicles. Since there is a separate transit forum... Can we move the discussion there and focus on Downtown San Jose specific development?
A lot of good comments there. I think the cost will definitely be at least an order of magnitude less than a tunnel for highway cars. It's all about how the tunnels are built. There has been no disruption in tunnel construction for decades. Taking out human drivers also compresses how close the cars can be and the maximum speed (over 150 mph).

Spontaneous fires and accidents are extremely unlikely in a controlled environment like this. The loop will also run under utilities, shouldn't be an issue. Elevators and escalators might be a problem, and while they have car elevators running right now... I doubt many will used in actuality.

The cheapest way to build a mid-sized station would be to bore from a section of a parking lot (also eliminates the need for elevators and escalators). We have a lot of those in San Jose and can still develop over a Loop station--in fact it would be super convenient (and quiet) for residents and office workers above. In the context of San Jose development, this should help increase density across SJ, not just Downtown. It would be great so see some mixed use highrises along North 1st, Evergreen, East Side, etc. I think loops would be the cheapest way to enable that.
 

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thesanjoseblog.com
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And to stay more on topic, I'm headed to The Grad to help a friend move in. The views are outstanding. 800 people are moving in this weekend and they expect to fully sell out in a matter of weeks. Happy to answer any questions about the project or provide photos. It's much nicer than any student-oriented housing I've ever seen (and SCU was pretty solid). Many people I met today were young professionals at tech companies. I think this type of housing could really work in SJ and help bring rental costs down.

411032
 

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Landscape Architect
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And to stay more on topic, I'm headed to The Grad to help a friend move in. The views are outstanding. 800 people are moving in this weekend and they expect to fully sell out in a matter of weeks. Happy to answer any questions about the project or provide photos. It's much nicer than any student-oriented housing I've ever seen (and SCU was pretty solid). Many people I met today were young professionals at tech companies. I think this type of housing could really work in SJ and help bring rental costs down.

View attachment 411032
Is this student only housing?
 

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And to stay more on topic, I'm headed to The Grad to help a friend move in. The views are outstanding. 800 people are moving in this weekend and they expect to fully sell out in a matter of weeks. Happy to answer any questions about the project or provide photos. It's much nicer than any student-oriented housing I've ever seen (and SCU was pretty solid). Many people I met today were young professionals at tech companies. I think this type of housing could really work in SJ and help bring rental costs down.

View attachment 411032
Much appreciate you sharing this, @JoshuaSantos, great view via the photo provided.
 

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No, I believe that would be illegal. So while it's marketed towards college students, I believe anyone can move in.
Correct. They have no legal capacity to limit it to students.

This is actually a frustrating problem talking about student housing. Most people don't realize the distinction between housing for students (ie, dorms) and housing marketed at students.
 

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Gas station Oakland Road




Brokaw




... Parking garage at SJC is built. Can be seen off 101

How far on Oakland Road is that new gas station being built? Is it closer to Montague, Oakland & Brokaw, or 101?
 

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If Council approves this plan, affordable housing fees will be cut to $0 for all residential high-rises until June 2023, after which the fee will increase to $13/sqft and return to the original levels by 2025.
 

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And to stay more on topic, I'm headed to The Grad to help a friend move in. The views are outstanding. 800 people are moving in this weekend and they expect to fully sell out in a matter of weeks. Happy to answer any questions about the project or provide photos. It's much nicer than any student-oriented housing I've ever seen (and SCU was pretty solid). Many people I met today were young professionals at tech companies. I think this type of housing could really work in SJ and help bring rental costs down.

View attachment 411032
wow, i figured their leasing numbers would be decimated when sjsu decided to go virtual for the fall semester. the fact that the young professional crowd stepped in and filled the void is proof of demand for this type of housing downtown. starcity should be able to use them as a prime example in their search for financing. does it seem like groups of friends are renting suites together? or is it more total strangers moving in sharing the suites?

the more pics the better! i'd love to see the rooftop deck and podium amenities. i'm sure the views looking north and west are pretty killer as well.
 

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Silicon Valley tops list of U.S. metro areas in new apartment growth

https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose...n-valley-apartment-construction-san-jose.html

Silicon Valley is expected to double the number of new apartment units added this year compared to the number of those added last year, with apartment construction in the region now at a five-year high.

That's according to a report published Monday by apartment listing website RentCafe that's based on data referring to apartment buildings with 50 units or more. The report found that the San Jose metropolitan area is projected to add 5,829 new apartment units to its apartment inventory by the end of 2020, more than double the 2,912 new apartment units added to the region by the end of 2019.
 
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