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Discussion Starter #1
SANTIAGO CALATRAVA





Santiago Calatrava Valls born 28 July 1951 is a Spanish neofuturistic architect, structural engineer, sculptor and painter. He has offices in New York City, Doha, and Zürich. Calatrava's early career was largely dedicated to bridges and railway stations, with designs that elevated the status of civil engineering projects to new heights. His Montjuic Communications Tower in Barcelona, Spain (1991) in the heart of the 1992 Olympics site, as well as the Allen Lambert Galleria in Toronto, Canada (1992), were important works and turning points in his career, leading to a wide range of commissions. The Quadracci Pavilion (2001) of the Milwaukee Art Museum was his first building in the United States. Calatrava's entry into high-rise design began with an innovative 54-story-high twisting tower called Turning Torso (2005), located in Malmö, Sweden. Calatrava has designed a neofuturistic railway station, the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, at the rebuilt World Trade Center in New York City. It is expected to open in 2015, six years behind schedule, at a cost of $4 billion, twice the original budget. In 2002 he was awarded the Sir Misha Black award and was added to the College of Medallists. Calatrava has defined his style as bridging the division between structural engineering and architecture. In his projects, he claims to continue a tradition of Spanish modernist engineering that included Félix Candela, Antonio Gaudí, and Rafael Guastavino, with a very personal style that derives from numerous studies of the human body and the natural world. Architecture critics, however, see his work as a continuation of the neofuturistic expressionism of Eero Saarinen. On 10 December 2011, he was appointed a member of the Pontifical Council for Culture for a five-year renewable term by Pope Benedict XVI.

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Women's Bridge - Buenos Aires, Argentina




Puente de la Mujer (Spanish for "Women's Bridge") is a rotating footbridge for Dock 3 of the Puerto Madero commercial district of Buenos Aires, Argentina. It is of the Cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge type and is also a swing bridge, but somewhat unusual in its asymmetrical arrangement. It has a single mast with cables suspending a portion of the bridge which rotates 90 degrees in order to allow water traffic to pass. When it swings to allow watercraft passage, the far end comes to a resting point on a stabilizing pylon.

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Museu do Amanhã (Museum of Tomorrow)
RIO DE JANEIRO


The Museum of Tomorrow was awarded the Leading Culture Destinations Award 2018 at the LCD Awards in London. This British award is recognized as the ‘Oscar of Museums’. The Rio de Janeiro Museum that has become an icon of Brazilian Culture abroad was the winner in the category of ‘Best Cultural Organization of the Year’ in the promotion of ‘Soft Power’.
https://www.idg.org.br/en/museum-of-tomorrow-was-awarded-the-oscarof-museums-2018


Museu do Amanhã (Museum of Tomorrow) by B u t t e r f l y ઇ*ઉ Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ ઇ*ઉ Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ, no Flickr


Rio 2016 - Boulevard Olímpico - Balão Panorâmico Skol - Rio de Janeiro - Foto: Alexandre Macieira | Riotur by Riotur.Rio, no Flickr


Rio 2016 - Boulevard Olímpico - Balão Panorâmico Skol - Rio de Janeiro - Foto: Alexandre Macieira | Riotur by Riotur.Rio, no Flickr




Museu do Amanhã (Museum of Tomorrow) by B u t t e r f l y ઇ*ઉ Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ ઇ*ઉ Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ, no Flickr


Museum of Tomorrow - LE by Rodolfo Ribas, no Flickr
 

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Kinky Christian
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Congrats on the Award, but even more so for choosing Calatrava to design the Museum.
The first time I saw the building it appeared like it belongs to a far more advanced cosmic civilization.
Now that I see it, it still has the exact same appeal.
 

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Kinky Christian
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Some month ago I was reading the book "Drawing Building Reflecting" which Cristina Carrillo co-wrote with Calatrava and saw illustrations from the bridge in Jerusalem for the first time.
It's a magnificent structure and an engineering marvel, had no idea why I haven't heard of it earlier.
 

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Here in Greece we remember Calatrava from the renovation of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. I consider it one of his best works so far. I've never felt like it doesn't fit in the area, which is probably because it is in Marousi, a rather modern neighborhood of Athens. I consider it the second most iconic thing in Athens after the Acropolis.


https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/athens-olympic-sports-complex

Here is the "Spyros Louis" Olympic Stadium, with its roof that was added shortly before the Olympics. This design must be unique in the world and the support structure is not obvious with a first look. The two sections of the roof are supported by arches from below and above while holding onto each other on the ends for lateral stabilization. It truly looks like it's hovering above the ground.


https://footballtripper.com/greece/olympic-stadium-athens/


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_Stadium_(Athens)

I never went to the 2004 Olympics to see the stadium myself. The first time I entered was during a school trip in 2012. I remember watching the stadium on TV and occasionaly passing by in my father's car and being truly astonished by this roof. But what was even more awe-inspiring for me was this massive cauldron I saw on TV.


https://sports.yahoo.com/twitter-reacts-olympic-torch-lighting-pyeongchang-043252843.html

Here is the Velodrome, which received a similar renovation.


https://acp-hellas.com/en/indicative-projects/
 

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