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Every major urban area have satellite cities or new town in them. Satellite cities are defined as smaller municipalities that are near a major city and are part of large urban areas. The difference between them and suburbs is that they have their own municipal governments.

New Towns on the other hand are newly developed communities which are outside the city.

HK has several new towns. One of them is Tung Chung which is in Lantau Island near the airport. This new town was developed during the late 90s along with the construction of Chek Lap Kok. Today, it has several private flats, government housing estates and two shopping malls. The town is connected with the highway and the MTR. Most of the people living in Tung Chung work in the airport or are flight attendents.

Tung Chung, Hong Kong





Any new towns / satellite cities around your city?
 

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WANCH said:
Most of the people living in Tung Chung work in the airport or are flight attendents.
Are you sure? Tung Chung Looks big to have most of the people working in the airport... :)
 

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forvine said:
Are you sure? Tung Chung Looks big to have most of the people working in the airport... :)
HK's airport is big as well. Well let's say a big percentage of those who live in Tung Chung work in the airport and surrounding areas like The Regal Airport Hotel and Cathay Pacific.
 

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here are pictures of the rising Bonifacio Global City in Taguig City in Metro Manila.. this is a new CBD in the making within the metro that promises world-class developments and lifestyle to its residents... big companies are also starting to move into the new office buildings that are being built within...







 

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WANCH said:
Every major urban area have satellite cities or new town in them. Satellite cities are defined as smaller municipalities that are near a major city and are part of large urban areas. The difference between them and suburbs is that they have their own municipal governments.

New Towns on the other hand are newly developed communities which are outside the city.
I suppose it depends on different cultural definitions. Satellite cities can also be surrounding cities, separate to the urban area, but part of the metropolitan area.

New Towns can also fall into the urban area if that expands to encompass it.
 

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I'm not sure but i think Almere is also a satellite town of Amsterdam:

1961

1975

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1993

2000

2004
 

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I stayed in a satellite city in Seoul it seemed quite nice in terms of looks and everything seemed well kept and modern but the problem was to do anything you had to go into Seoul. This meant a very long subway journey or an equally long drive on jam packed highways :(
 

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I had trouble defining what you meant by


Every major urban area have satellite cities or new town in them. Satellite cities are defined as smaller municipalities that are near a major city and are part of large urban areas. The difference between them and suburbs is that they have their own municipal governments.
For the Paris metro, every suburb/town/city surrounding Paris has its own independant municipality, as a matter of fact, some of the new towns they developed in the 70's don't have their own municipalities but are made up of the addition of smaller towns.


Five "big" new towns were created, Cergy, Marne-la-vallée, evry, Sénart and Saint quentin en Yvelinne (and some smaller ones, such as Les Ulis, but they are not really considered as new towns)


Evry (south of Paris, sometimes considered as the "worst" of the new towns, as it has a pretty bad reputation, and houses loads of projects, it is neither urban and pedestrian oriented, but neither suburban, really weird)




some weird architecture



Cergy

(we can see la Défense on the upper right corner of the photo)






Marne la Vallée (the most dynamic one, to the east of Paris, currently booming, and where Dysneyland is located)









Saint quentin en Yvelines (where I go to the university :D )


They built a mall on the empty land in the picture






Sénart, the most rural and less developed one






A lot of the photos for these new towns are outdated though, but it's hard to find some on the net.
 

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Justme said:
I suppose it depends on different cultural definitions. Satellite cities can also be surrounding cities, separate to the urban area, but part of the metropolitan area.

New Towns can also fall into the urban area if that expands to encompass it.
Very true. Suburbs and satellies can both have their own municipal governments as well.
 

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grachtengordeldier said:
Great pics of Almere! Don't have a big pic from 2006? A lot has already changed sinds 2000. Toch prachtig!
Niet dat ik weet, ik ben deze plaatjes ook toevallig tegengekomen bij het googlen naar Almere :)
 

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my area is too small for this... But my capital copenhagen are building a new sattelite city right now.(called ørestaden) its on amager (near the airport)


http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=95462

^^check this tread out to find more infomation ^^
 

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virtual said:
I had trouble defining what you meant by




For the Paris metro, every suburb/town/city surrounding Paris has its own independant municipality, as a matter of fact, some of the new towns they developed in the 70's don't have their own municipalities but are made up of the addition of smaller towns.


Five "big" new towns were created, Cergy, Marne-la-vallée, evry, Sénart and Saint quentin en Yvelinne (and some smaller ones, such as Les Ulis, but they are not really considered as new towns)


Evry (south of Paris, sometimes considered as the "worst" of the new towns, as it has a pretty bad reputation, and houses loads of projects, it is neither urban and pedestrian oriented, but neither suburban, really weird)




some weird architecture



Cergy

(we can see la Défense on the upper right corner of the photo)






Marne la Vallée (the most dynamic one, to the east of Paris, currently booming, and where Dysneyland is located)









Saint quentin en Yvelines (where I go to the university :D )


They built a mall on the empty land in the picture






Sénart, the most rural and less developed one






A lot of the photos for these new towns are outdated though, but it's hard to find some on the net.
@Virtual: Very interesting photos and information. I am a little confused though. I know that central Paris, the area that has a population of about 2.2 million and has the Louvre, Eiffel Tower, Left Bank, etc., is a very nice part of metropolitan Paris.

Surrounding this area are the "banlieues" were we have seen rioting in the last few years. These tend to have low-income housing where various poor people live.

Then we have the satellite cities that you have shown photos of above. Most look very well designed and look like really nice places to live.

Is this a correct understanding of the layout of metropolitan Paris? If not, could you give me a better idea of how the metro area is laid out? :)
 

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banlieues and "new towns" are touching each others, they Look nice but some of them have ghetto problems .

Ghettos made of commieblocks are often close to traditionnal city centers (made in the 19th and before) composed of 3to 7 stories buildings and houses . But not every commieblock area is a ghetto. and not every banlieue has commieblocks.
plus theires suburbs with modern houses.

and theire was banlieues with no riots.

And ... last thing, theire IS traditionnal city centers in some of the new towns, wich developped around villages in some cases

:D

i think i killed you
 
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