SkyscraperCity banner

41 - 60 of 108 Posts

·
Annman
Joined
·
6,928 Posts
I certainly hope they go with the 'Refract' design template. We have way, way, WAAYYY too many square/rectangular glass boxes in this part of the city. Otherwise, this would be an awesome addition to the Denny Triangle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,925 Posts
I ask every time the subject comes up. But has the DPD ever picked something other than the preferred alternative?

Seems to me, they either say yes (possibly with some small tweaks) or they send them back to the drawing board. I've never heard of a project where they presented their 3 alternatives and the DPD said "mmm... nah... We don't like your preferred... We want #2 instead..."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
A 600'er here would begin to visually re-define the whole area. I like the Refract option
especially if the top is angled. If this stays at this height (please god), the developer has
a great opportunity to be a trendsetter in getting the hell out of the 440' tabletop club.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
In the design packet the architects clearly show that this site has a maximum zoning height of 550'. On Page 19 they note that the proposed height of 605' is based on a "pending OMNIBUS code revision."

Anyone have any idea what that is?
 

·
Correspondent
Joined
·
8,274 Posts
From todays DJC.

https://www.djc.com/news/re/12124692.html

August 23, 2019

LPC West unveils design for 53-story Seattle tower

The project, at 800 Stewart St., would combine offices, apartments and retail.

By BRIAN MILLER
Real Estate Editor

As the DJC first reported in February, the owner of a small old corner office building at 800 Stewart St. plans to redevelop with a high-rise apartment tower. Lincoln Property Co. West and Weber Thompson are representing the owner.

The five-story 1978 building, once home to Watermark Credit Union, will be removed. It's on the northeast corner of Eighth Avenue and Stewart, in the Denny Triangle. The planned 53-story tower would have 568 units and 104 parking spaces on five underground levels.

Weber Thompson's preferred design appears to be “Refract,” which has facets and planes carved out of the glass facade, thus creating more surfaces and angles on what would otherwise be a four-sided box. In architect-speak, the design has chamfered corners.

At ground level, there would be an L-shaped retail/commercial bay on the corner, its size unspecified. The offices and apartments would have separate lobbies and elevator banks — on Stewart and Eighth, respectively.





The rooftop level would have a tenant lounge and terrace. There would also be a business lounge on the 33rd floor.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
365 Posts
Fantastic looking building.

Side Note: If dt Seattle ends up looking anything like iogeons projected downtown photos the city will clearly have one of the largest greater downtowns in the country.

IMO the only larger greater dt areas than Seattle currently:

NYC, Chicago, San Francisco, D.C, Philadelphia, Los Angeles (slightly), Atlanta (including midtown).

Seattle is punching above its weight.
 

·
Annman
Joined
·
6,928 Posts
I actually found Philadelphia's downtown quite compact and perhaps on par in size with Seattle's downtown if one includes it from SLU and Seattle Center to Pioneer Square.
EDIT: Did a quick/rough measure of the two in GoogleEarth, and they're almost exactly the same now. Philly's denser core is 3.2 km (E to W) and 1.5 km (N to S), an Seattle is 3.2 km (N to S) and varies from 1 km in south to 2 km in north (E to W). Excuse the metric: I think in SI units.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
365 Posts
I agree, but I "think" Philly still has more commercial space and is more densely populated adjacent to it's central core, but there is no doubt Seattle will pass it in the near future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
My take- don’t hold your breath for this. Maybe next cycle? The world is starting to show pretty clear indications for recession. Possibly even major.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,476 Posts
I actually found Philadelphia's downtown quite compact and perhaps on par in size with Seattle's downtown if one includes it from SLU and Seattle Center to Pioneer Square.
EDIT: Did a quick/rough measure of the two in GoogleEarth, and they're almost exactly the same now. Philly's denser core is 3.2 km (E to W) and 1.5 km (N to S), an Seattle is 3.2 km (N to S) and varies from 1 km in south to 2 km in north (E to W). Excuse the metric: I think in SI units.
All Americans should be trained to be familiar with metric. The rest of the world is.
 

·
Annman
Joined
·
6,928 Posts
^^ It's a particular pain to do architecture as well as planning design in imperial (American customary units), as they are so cumbersome in math and in annotation, and archaic in their inter-unit measures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
All Americans should be trained to be familiar with metric. The rest of the world is.
Totally agree, but on the plus side if most Americans pay attention in high school Chemistry they'll be familiar with the metric system and have a lot of the conversions down. Absolutely think we should convert to metric sometime in the future, but Americans are generally more familiar with metric than foreigners are with Imperial (as one would expect).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,925 Posts
Totally agree, but on the plus side if most Americans pay attention in high school Chemistry they'll be familiar with the metric system and have a lot of the conversions down. Absolutely think we should convert to metric sometime in the future, but Americans are generally more familiar with metric than foreigners are with Imperial (as one would expect).
I favor a British model (since we're using their units anyways). Road signs and coloquial usage are all imperial, but officially all metric.

And I have to point that out every time folks try to bring up the "The US is one of only 3 countries that still uses imperial". The Brits still use it too... Pretty close to the same amount the US uses it.
 
41 - 60 of 108 Posts
Top