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That really is a great location for hotels and condos: it's right where 3 major neighborhoods meet - downtown, belltown and the denny triangle; it's just a couple blocks from Westlake center; it's just a couple blocks from the end of SLUT, the monorail, and a major Link station; right next door to a couple Tom Douglas restaurants; just a few blocks from Amazon; only 5 blocks from the Market. This is where tourists want to be. It increasingly feels like New York City, but with easy access to the big Seattle landmarks.

You don't consider Belltown and Denny Triangle part of downtown? They are almost always considered a part of it. Maybe by 'downtown', you mean the 'Retail Core'? (What a stupid name.)
 

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Official Seattle maps call it the "Business District". What most people call the downtown core would be divided between the Business district and " west edge". Greater downtown would include Belltown, Pioneer Square, SLU, Capitol Hill, First Hill, Lower Queen Anne, the Waterfront and the International District. At least that's what I got from the maps.
 

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What do you mean "official"? Why would such a thing be anything more than opinion, and who would be in charge of such a thing?
 

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It was a "downtown neighborhoods map" released by the city of Seattle, sounds official to me. Saw it a while back. I'll look and try to find it.

Edit- I guess my memory was a little shakey, it wasn't the city of Seattle but some kind of booster organization called Seattle Downtown Association.

http://www.downtownseattle.com/neighborhoods/

And it looks like they have gone back to calling the business district the "retail core" ( yes, its a stupid name) and they are trying to rebrand Queen Anne "uptown" so **** em.
 

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Yay, another "Define Downtown Seattle" discussion!

The City Clerk's map of Downtown is probably the "official" map, but it is very simplified and omits several neighborhoods. The Downtown Seattle Association has a more detailed map, but it still has inaccuracies.
 

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I like the increased residential/hotel density around McGraw Square. The streetcar has already added some much-needed positive activity (Amazonians getting lunch at food trucks, for ex.); this can only make it better.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
And then someday BoA is going to make an absolute killing on their land and hopefully we get a really special design on a residential or mixed use tower on that piece of land to finish off that area.
 

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My ideas for the B of A site at McGraw is a sourt of 'Crystal Palace' food court with glass panels that open up to be open air in summer, but still light and open during the winter when the panels are all closed.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I'd be fine with that being a ground level thing but I don't want to waste that opportunity to build some serious transit oriented residential density in the heart of the city. You have bus, light rail, street car and bike lanes literally surrounding this site. Build up up up and little or no parking!
 

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Still want the big fountain and open space there (with SLUT bisecting with other open space).
Well, if the SLUT meanders down to 1st. Ave., it will no longer have a terminus at McGraw Park, so the park then gains more open space.

LCIII, how about we build something like Citigroup tower:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citigroup_Center

Raising the tower ~10 stories above the plaza (wouldn't count against the height limits) and then opening up/expanding/improving the park?
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I would vote in favor of that!

And even if the park isn't the end of the line, they'll still be a stop there. Connecting it to the rest of the line makes it more attractive to TOD, not less.
 

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You don't consider Belltown and Denny Triangle part of downtown? They are almost always considered a part of it. Maybe by 'downtown', you mean the 'Retail Core'? (What a stupid name.)
Whatever :nuts: Yes, I would consider Belltown part of "greater downtown." Maybe CBD? "Retail core" is such a lame name. Maybe "National Retail Chain District" or the "Street Drug Core."
 

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Anyway, I would love to see McGraw Square expanded a bit to include more seating (chairs and tables), food vendors, perhaps a performance space, and a new entrance to Westlake station (it's only a block away - should be feasible with an underground pedestrian tunnel, right?).

On one corner of the block could be a new super-skinny pencil tower.
 

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1903 Fifth Ave. | 50 Stories | 500'

Official Seattle maps call it the "Business District". What most people call the downtown core would be divided between the Business district and " west edge". Greater downtown would include Belltown, Pioneer Square, SLU, Capitol Hill, First Hill, Lower Queen Anne, the Waterfront and the International District. At least that's what I got from the maps.

Oh I've always regarded Belltown, Denny triangle, the western slope of First Hill, and the ID as part of downtown.
 

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It was a "downtown neighborhoods map" released by the city of Seattle, sounds official to me. Saw it a while back. I'll look and try to find it.

Edit- I guess my memory was a little shakey, it wasn't the city of Seattle but some kind of booster organization called Seattle Downtown Association.

http://www.downtownseattle.com/neighborhoods/

And it looks like they have gone back to calling the business district the "retail core" ( yes, its a stupid name) and they are trying to rebrand Queen Anne "uptown" so **** em.

Yeah! **** 'em nice and good with something hard and sandpapery! Maybe MHays can do the honours, since he believes defining downtown is completely subjective and relative!
 

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How far up First Hill would you consider it to be 'downtown?' Boren seems to be logical, but I imagine we'd all have different opinions.
 

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1903 Fifth Ave. | 50 Stories | 500'

How far up First Hill would you consider it to be 'downtown?' Boren seems to be logical, but I imagine we'd all have different opinions.

Broadway and Union. The neighbourhood doesn't change enough past Boren, but it does past Broadway. And that's pretty close to the official city definition too.

First Hill west of Broadway is just too high-density and urban to be considered an outlying neighbourhood, in my estimation. And so I-5 runs through downtown, not on the eastern edge of it.
 

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This "official" concept is a compete mystery to me. What purpose would it serve? Or do you think governments serve this sort of function without a reason? Have you ever heard of a public debate over an "official" neighborhood boundary outside of a specific purpose like zoning or schools?

The DSA divides things for marketing purposes, and for the related data collection. They're an organization of members, and while they're the loudest Downtown Seattle voice, there's nothing "official" about anything they say. Their maps are influenced by member opinion, like the overly large "retail" district area.

Various City departments divide neighborhoods for their own purposes. Urban villages and zoning overlays for example. Those are ad-hoc for the specific purpose being discussed, such as village boundaries that accommodate the future rather than today. Police by precinct, Parks in some way presumably, school districts by school assignment zones at each level, and so on.

So who's the "official" judge of these things in your minds? Someone at the City who juggles the competing department versions and renders judgement? Ever heard of this guy?
 
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