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Journeyman
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This is in the same zone that results in 440' (or a little less) for every residential, not 450' unless some detail in the rules changes, like the one that's resulted in Belltown's 240' zone getting a 255' recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think you're reading it wrong. 450 units, not feet. Nobody has stated an exact height but the document does ask about allowances for amenities above 400' so I think it's safe to say it's 400+'
 

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From yesterdays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/re/12081274.html

September 3, 2015

Real Estate Buzz: Another Bosa brother has his eye on Seattle

By NAT LEVY
Real Estate Reporter

A developer named Robert Bosa seems to be teeing up a big project in Seattle.

If that names sounds familiar, you are probably thinking of Nat Bosa, whose company Bosa Development is already building the Insignia condo towers in the Denny Triangle near Amazon. It's Nat's brother Robert who has plans for a pentagonal site at 2014 Fairview Ave. Robert has his own company called Bosa Properties.

Early permitting documents show Bosa Properties is contemplating a residential tower with 450 units and 370 parking spaces. The total square footage would be 420,000 square feet, but the documents don't say how tall.

It is unclear if Robert Bosa is planning condos or apartments. Bosa Properties is based in Vancouver, B.C., and mostly has built condos there, but it also has rental properties.

Bosa offers a program called BosaEquity that helps renters become homeowners: 15 percent of tenants' monthly rent goes into a credit account that can be used toward a down payment on one of the company's condos.

Bosa Properties representatives did not return calls requesting comment. ZGF Cotter Architects was listed on project documents, but the firm referred questions back to Bosa Properties.

Bosa's Fairview project would have a lot of company. The site is along a four-block stretch of Denny Way where more than 4,100 other residential units already are in the works.

• Kitty corner to Bosa Properties' site, Onni Group is planning four towers with 1,910 units at 1120 John St. and 1120 Denny Way.

• The DJC reported last week that H5 Capital is planning two 42-story towers with 840 units at 121 Boren Ave. N. on the block west of Onni's project.

• Mack Urban wants to build 420 units in a 40-story tower on the same block as H5's project, directly north and west of the H5 site.

• Just west of the H5/Mack Urban block Holland Partner Group is planning a 40-story, 468-unit apartment tower at 970 Denny Way.

• On the next block to the west, Vulcan Real Estate is planning an 18-story, 400,000-square-foot office tower and a 28,000-square-foot commercial structure at 111 Westlake Ave. N. Those buildings would share the block with another new Vulcan project: a 41-story tower with 470 units and a 7,000-square-foot retail building at 110 Ninth Ave. N.

Most of these units are expected to be apartments, so if Bosa decides to build condos he wouldn't have direct competition.

The Bosas have a long history in the Vancouver area. Robert, Nat and their six brothers came to British Columbia from Italy in the 1950s, according to news reports, and started out building houses together as Bosa Brothers Construction.

Robert Bosa's son, Colin Bosa, is the CEO of Bosa Properties today. News reports say at the age of 23, Colin Bosa was managing three British Columbia high rise projects worth more than $65 million for his father's company.

Dean Jones, principal and owner of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty, grew up in Vancouver and said the Bosas are one of Canada's most prolific and respected real estate families.

Nat Bosa's company, Bosa Development, has done projects in a number of U.S. cities including San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle. But Bosa Properties' website shows it hasn't strayed far from Vancouver with residential projects. It also has office, retail and industrial properties in Vancouver and other parts of western Canada.

So why is Bosa Properties now deciding to venture into Seattle? The firm may be drawn toward the hot Puget Sound market, or trying to diversify beyond the Canadian market — where there's been talk of a housing bubble about to burst.

Both Nat and Robert Bosa have their own construction companies, which helps make projects feasible when they might not be for others, Jones said. Nat Bosa's construction division is building Insignia in Seattle.

“(The Bosas) prefer to be on the front end of a market cycle because they have the resources to build what others won't,” Jones said.

Jones noted that almost all of the condos being built in Seattle now are backed by foreign money. Luma is a 24-story condo tower under construction on First Hill with money from the Swedish pension fund Alecta. Several other condo projects here have Chinese money behind them. Jones said foreign investors can be more comfortable with risk than U.S. investors. In the condo boom prior to the recession, Jones said, condo builders would use mezzanine financing from Wall Street and then get a construction loan for the rest, but that financing model never returned after the recession.

And with rents and values so high, apartments are the safer and smarter investment right now.

“In order for condos to make more sense, you would have to achieve an even higher value. Not just matching the value of apartments, but exceeding them,” Jones said.


Bosa Properties may build 450 housing units at 2014 Fairview Ave. More than 4,100 units are already in the works along Denny Way.

 

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One more time with the math (getting hard to keep track)...

-1910 in the Onni towers
-840 in the H5 blocks
-420 in the Mack Urban tower
-468 in the Holland Project
-470 in the Vulcan project
-and 450 in this one.

For a total of 4558 units. Ocupancy of 5000-5500 people?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
And immediately adjacent to those projects are the sets at twins at 1200 Stewart and 1901 Minor.
 

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One more time with the math (getting hard to keep track)...

-1910 in the Onni towers
-840 in the H5 blocks
-420 in the Mack Urban tower
-468 in the Holland Project
-470 in the Vulcan project
-and 450 in this one.

For a total of 4558 units. Ocupancy of 5000-5500 people?
I'd think you're probably looking closer to about 6500-7000. A lot of couples in the one and two bedrooms.
 

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J'en ai marre.
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The progression between pages 19 (existing buildings), 20 (proposed and under construction), and 21 (allowed massing by zoning) in that draft packet is simply astounding. Fully built, this area (Denny Triangle and the one block strip on north side of Denny) could be around 25 new residential high rise towers, with around 10,000 units. More restrictive tower spacing rules could cut about a half a dozen of those towers...
 

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The progression between pages 19 (existing buildings), 20 (proposed and under construction), and 21 (allowed massing by zoning) in that draft packet is simply astounding. Fully built, this area (Denny Triangle and the one block strip on north side of Denny) could be around 25 new residential high rise towers, with around 10,000 units. More restrictive tower spacing rules could cut about a half a dozen of those towers...
I totally agree. I posted screenshots on both the Denny Triangle thread and on the SLU thread.

I also added this project to the SDDN Front Page.
 

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honk!!!
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The progression between pages 19 (existing buildings), 20 (proposed and under construction), and 21 (allowed massing by zoning) in that draft packet is simply astounding. Fully built, this area (Denny Triangle and the one block strip on north side of Denny) could be around 25 new residential high rise towers, with around 10,000 units. More restrictive tower spacing rules could cut about a half a dozen of those towers...
That was my favorite part, too. Just wish we had a little more height variation, and a subway line to replace the 8.

Manhattanize Seattle!
 

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I noticed that they're including Daola Tower which makes me wonder how well they've been keeping track of things. I'm pretty sure that Daola Tower was toast long before they wrote this document.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Looks pretty damn accurate to me. It's partially blocked so we can't see for sure if they got the ever-so-slight taper perfect.

They did a pretty good job detailing the few curves that exist among the projects proposed in that immediate area. Unfortunately there aren't that many. It's all hard angles and Kinects is as guilty as the next, even if it isn't just a box.
 

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So this begs he question: If all these residential towers are successful (and ai have no reason to doubt hat they wouldn't be), where is the next area for up zoning? I don't think anybody foresaw as much development in such a compressed time as we've seen along Stewart and Denny streets.
 

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J'en ai marre.
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So this begs he question: If all these residential towers are successful (and ai have no reason to doubt hat they wouldn't be), where is the next area for up zoning? I don't think anybody foresaw as much development in such a compressed time as we've seen along Stewart and Denny streets.
I'd say Belltown, Uptown/LQA and Interbay, which would be along anticipated high capacity transit between downtown/Ballard. Add in central district and Ranier Valley.
 
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