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1/21/2019 Update:

Skyscraper Section:
  • DOT MAPs: 2/16 & 2/17 - removal of the 5th Ave & Union St tower crane, as it is no longer needed for the smaller floorplates up high.
  • Concrete has been poured on levels 1 & 2, although there are many places awaiting a pour on said levels.
  • Rebar has been laid up to level 3.
  • On the filler section between the skyscraper and the hotel, crews have set up the formwork for level -1.
  • Floorplates reach level 11, although levels 11 & 10 are incomplete.
  • Steel beams, outrigger columns and parts of the core reach level 13.









Highrise Section:
  • Not much to mention, except that they have covered most of the protruding rebar at the columns and concrete core with weather protection.



Site Overview:
In regards to the project camera having a bad angle - I asked about it and heard back:

"We're currently moving cameras around to get different views and a new one will be up hopefully this week in the original position."
I would recommend the northeast-facing corner of 1201 Third Ave, at least 50 floors up.

 

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In regards to the project camera having a bad angle - I asked about it and heard back:

"We're currently moving cameras around to get different views and a new one will be up hopefully this week in the original position."
Made my day:cheers:. Thank you!
 

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That looks like an out of date rendering. I see the extra swoop cut out at 5th and Union corner that I think was deleted awhile back. Also, what looks like lots of decks with plantings seems out of date at the 5th Ave mega swoop.
 

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I don’t fully understand the new system for erecting the steel more quickly. What I do understand is time is money, so I imagine this is a system we’ll be seeing a lot more of in the future. It’s remarkable how fast this is going up.
 

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I don’t fully understand the new system for erecting the steel more quickly.

Its not really the steel structure that's speeding this project up.

Typically with a steel structure building, you have a concrete core that provides shear strength for the building (steel can stretch a lot more than concrete, so the concrete keeps the building from swaying side to side). This is generally what takes the longest to build (have to lay re-bar, install form work, pour concrete, let it set, remove form work, etc). After that, the steel framing can be installed at 1 floor/day almost (maybe a bit longer, but definitely a lot faster than doing 1 floor of the concrete core).

The special thing about this building is the core is instead a steel box filled with concrete instead of the concrete poured around a lattice of steel re-bar. The box can be pre-fabricated just like the rest of the steel structure. once its installed, steel work for that floor can start with it and the concrete pour can happen at the same time too, and then you don't have form work to disassemble and you don't have to wait for the concrete to cure as long. All these things speed up construction quite a bit.

I'm sure folks in the industry can correct a few points, but I think I got the main idea?
 

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They poured a massive amount of concrete today on both sites. Most notable is another floor of the "gap" is done. Damn near continuous cement trucks at the 5th&Union pump all day until about 6:45pm. I suspect the garage level slabs were the target of all this.
They also put in what appears to be a temporary asphalt ramp into the main parking garage entrance ramp located on Union.

The structure is starting to reach a height where more skyline shots show steel poking up. I wouldn't lose sleep betting a hefty penny this thing tops out before the end of this year, provided the design and theory progress as intended.
 

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Considering in less than 4 months they've gone the equivalent of 18 floors(4 garage, 14 tower), yeah I could see this topping out in the late summer if they keep up this kind of pace.
 

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Steel erection begins! I seem to remember seeing some press about the superstructure being 9 months from start to finish because of the new core method.
Can I put $5 on July 20th top-out?
I'm more inclined to go with this estimate for top out. The ascent began (for the most part) in mid-October. It took three months to rise to the 15th floor (or so) which continue to get smaller and go faster. Might have this thing enclosed by the end of the year!

Too aggressive?
 

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I'm more inclined to go with this estimate for top out. The ascent began (for the most part) in mid-October. It took three months to rise to the 15th floor (or so) which continue to get smaller and go faster. Might have this thing enclosed by the end of the year!

Too aggressive?
Perhaps not! We endured a 3 week strike in this timeline so if that had not occurred we might currently be at 20 floors. If this project tops out by the end of August (a conservative lot I am), uh.....Going from a dirt filled 85ft hole to 850ft in the air in less than a year...just wow.

EDIT: Crane crew onsite and it looks like the big boy is likely getting a jump!
 

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Its not really the steel structure that's speeding this project up.

Typically with a steel structure building, you have a concrete core that provides shear strength for the building (steel can stretch a lot more than concrete, so the concrete keeps the building from swaying side to side). This is generally what takes the longest to build (have to lay re-bar, install form work, pour concrete, let it set, remove form work, etc). After that, the steel framing can be installed at 1 floor/day almost (maybe a bit longer, but definitely a lot faster than doing 1 floor of the concrete core).

The special thing about this building is the core is instead a steel box filled with concrete instead of the concrete poured around a lattice of steel re-bar. The box can be pre-fabricated just like the rest of the steel structure. once its installed, steel work for that floor can start with it and the concrete pour can happen at the same time too, and then you don't have form work to disassemble and you don't have to wait for the concrete to cure as long. All these things speed up construction quite a bit.

I'm sure folks in the industry can correct a few points, but I think I got the main idea?
This is the first time I've truly understood what makes this process special; thanks for the clear explanation!

A while ago it was said on here that this method would benefit very tall highrises disproportionately compared to shorter highrises. Is this true? Wouldn't this method be as beneficial for a 200ft tower as a 800ft?
 

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This is the first time I've truly understood what makes this process special; thanks for the clear explanation!

A while ago it was said on here that this method would benefit very tall highrises disproportionately compared to shorter highrises. Is this true? Wouldn't this method be as beneficial for a 200ft tower as a 800ft?
I'm hoping some of the professionals on here can chime in and double check me on that explanation.

But to further pull from my arse, my guess is its down to fabrication costs for building the box. You're building 2 full walls of steel instead of just a lattice of re-bar, plus a more involved fabrication. For a shorter building, the amount of time/worker cost saved for sped up construction vs the extra cost of building the core box might not pencil out as well as it would in a taller building where you have a lot more floors to build.
 

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https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle...zon-will-market-rainier-square-tower-for.html

Amazon.com Inc. is following through on its plan to sublease all 722,000 square feet of its planned office space in Rainier Square, according to a well-placed commercial real estate source.

The news is a major blow to the Seattle commercial office market and surely will give developers with plans for speculative office buildings pause. It will affect other industry sectors like multifamily housing and retail since this means that thousands of employees the market was expecting to fill the tower won't be coming as soon as anticipated.
 

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Other than the middle finger it sends to the City - over its reverse on the head tax - I'm not sure why it should be a major blow. Whether the employees in the tower are Amazon or some other company I don't see how it matters. Amazon is still growing in the area just perhaps decided this particular tower was not the best place for that growth.
 

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While this is not good news this will give others a chance at some prime space. Maybe their expansion into Bellevue changed their plans. I don't see this as a reason yet to think the sky is falling. Personally I am sort glad to see an opportunity at some diversity of employers. I would love to see an expansion of some financial services here so we could be more of a regional hub for that industry.
 
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