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one.man.army
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Am I the only person who doesn't like this building? It is an engineering masterpiece no doubt but I don't like the shape, it doesn't feel balanced somehow, like it isn't in equilibrium. I guess that was the intention but it just doesn't look right to me.

Nice photos though.
 

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It's too bad there's no transparency in China when it comes to these things, because I'd be quite curious to know what happened to the hotel projected to open in the Shanghai Tower.
It's already 2020, nearly 5 years after the official inauguration of the building, but the hotel still hasn't opened.
One rather unusual feature of this hotel is that it's supposedly to be operated by Jinjiang International, a Chinese hotel chain, whereas usually you see big American and European chains getting hotel leases in supertall buildings.

Recently, there was an "official" website for the Shanghai Tower J Hotel
Here you can see the website through the wayback machine, though it's a bit buggy:
https://web.archive.org/web/20180826154255/https://www.jhotel-shanghai.com/
It used to read something like "opulence is worth the wait".
Now, however, the website hasn't even been renewed. Kinda embarrassing, really.
https://jhotel-shanghai.com/
I wonder if Jinjiang will ever open a hotel here, or if they're going through economic difficulties so big they will give up and let one of the luxury chains take the tower.
 

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What was it from? A broken pipe or a water main?
Could be a leaky roof/wall too. Shanghai appears to have periods of torrential rain which could set off something like this if the waterproofing fails.

Apparently, Shanghai Tower's unconventional floor plan makes it a little unattractive to potential tenants, as it's difficult to furnish a non-rectangular area effectively. Engineers also dislike working with non-rectangular floor plans, because the unconventional angles makes waterproofing a real hassle. Solutions made for ninety-degree angles have to be adapted to fit the whimsy of the architect, and the integrity of the results can't always be guaranteed.

(sigh). Seems like architects of today are slowly forgetting and abandoning what works in favour of their quest for the experimental and unconventional. Sure, the end result may look good, but those weird angles and non-straight lines kill an awful lot of functionality while adding risk factors by the boatload. In a sense, I can understand the new legislation in China, which basically serves to shake the architect by the shoulders and shout "draw me a goddamn building, and not an abstract sculpture, you massive dolt!". Can't tell you how often I've wanted to do the same.
 
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