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http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/camel..._hsmi=60569493


Draft CAMELLIA Planning

Camellia is poised for an exciting journey of renewal that will provide for a new riverside town centre positioned on the Parramatta Light Rail, as well as a proposed new primary school, 13 hectares of new open space and affordable housing.



The Department of Planning and Environment in consultation with the City of Parramatta Council have prepared a draft Camellia Town Centre Master Plan which will guide the future development of the industrial area over the next 20 to 30 years.


The draft Plan focuses on the Camellia Town Centre. The intent is to establish the town centre’s character as a new riverside community and, importantly, to ensure the renewal occurs in tandem with access and transport improvements such a bridge across Parramatta River, road improvements, and the creation of walking and cycling paths which will support a thriving, connected community on the doorstep of Sydney’s second CBD.


The draft Plan will inform the rezoning package for Camellia Town Centre, which when finalised, will provide an attractive place to live, work and play.

^^ CONT. LINK ^^
 

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I wonder where metro plans sit with this. I noticed they have potentially a second light rail. stop in the town centre described as an interchange.

For me I'd be happy for this thread to be seperate. It's a large renewal and there will be many individual projects over the years that come out of this planning process. Might get confusing if planning stuff like this is mixed in with an individual project.
 

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^^
125m

The draft master plan seeks to deliver:

• A future population of approximately 21,000 people

• Up to 200,000 sqm of commercial and retail employment floor space

• Up to 10,000 new dwellings with a minimum 5% affordable housing provision

Maximum building heights of up to 36 storeys, with two 40 storey towers up to 125m, with retail, commercial or community uses on the ground level, adjacent to the
proposed light rail stop.


http://planspolicies.planning.nsw.gov.au/index.pl?action=view_job&job_id=9087
















 

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wow thats impressiv.e great pit of dsensity just near parra
 

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So, just to give closure to this thread, it looks like the idea to turn Camellia into a residential town centre is dead and buried.

Comments below from the Greater Sydney Commission, coupled with insights from the Sydney Metro West Scoping report, imply that the land was too contaminated and flood prone for residential and that they now want to continue with its use as industrial.

This is also the reason Rydalmere was chosen as the potential Metro stop over Camellia. Conditions at Camellia apparently are apparently so bad it wasn't even suitable for the Metro stabling yards, hence why they decided to rip up Sydney Speedway (aka Parramatta Raceway) in Clyde instead.

R.I.P. Camellia Town Centre Planning Concept.:goodnight


https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw...-green-square-leppington-20191219-p53lmu.html

The precinct includes the industrial zone of Camellia, next to Rosehill Racecourse, formerly home to James Hardie's asbestos-ridden factories. The GSC no longer believes Camellia can become a residential town centre, arguing it is better developed as an industrial and commercial district with stabling yards for the western metro and light rail.

"When we delved deeper we found things we didn't appreciate [initially]," said the GSC's executive director of city planning infrastructure, Natalie Camilleri.

But that has irked organisations such as the Western Sydney Business Chamber, which was critical of several elements of the commission's plan in a submission it lodged last week.

The chamber said its members were "disappointed the Camellia-Rosehill precinct has been downgraded as a priority" in the GSC's infrastructure compact, and suggests the precinct is further sub-divided for "immediate activation".

Ms Turnbull said the commission was "certainly not saying 'no development or no change' - quite the opposite". But she added: "It's really hard to do 25 things brilliantly all at once. You're better off to focus on optimising what's already underway."
https://www.sydneymetro.info/sites/...port_Westmead_to_The_Bays_and_Sydney _CBD.pdf

A new metro station could be located in the future Camellia Town Centre, offering an opportunity for an interchange with the future Parramatta Light Rail and supporting urban renewal of the Camellia Peninsula.
This option would present considerable constructability challenges in relation to contamination and flooding
Following initial assessment, the former Shell refinery site (now the Viva Energy property) in the Camellia/Rosehill area and the Clyde site were identified as the possible locations for the stabling and maintenance facility. However, the Camellia/Rosehill location would present some challenges in relation to flooding and previous substantial contamination, which may pose constraints to construction methodology, program, cost, and worker health and safety.
 

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Camellia is a blight, whichever way you look at it. All they've done is put it in the "too hard" basket and let someone else deal with it in 20-30 years. I worked in Camellia for a few years and the place is an absolute nightmare to get in and out of, especially on race days. I guess by keeping it industrial they don't have to worry about increased traffic in the area.
 

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Disappointing result for Camellia.

There's at least a little bit of activity within the wider area. DA has been lodged for a large data centre at 10 Grand Ave Rosehill next to the Light Rail depot that's currently under construction, looks pretty sizable :

http://eplanning.parracity.nsw.gov.au/Pages/XC.Track/SearchApplication.aspx?id=604119
Love this proposal.
Equinix is the biggest data centre operator in the world, and having them in Rosehill will be great for companies setting up shop in Parramatta.

It'd be great in general for Camellia-Rosehill to diversify from dirty-industry to a bit more tech. Hopefully it will attract more High-tech industry and infrastructure to Parramatta and help it compete with Macquarie Park and Sydney-South where most other data centres are located.
 

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Data centres are largely remotely managed aside from an engineer to occasionally rack mount devices.
In other words the actual "workers" for this data centre will mostly be seated in the dominant IT areas. Ie North Sydney, Macquarie Park or the CBD and will only go to this data centre if there's like an emergency. Let's not overstate the economic impact.
 

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If former gas works at Cabarita can be turned into el-posho Breakfast Point, Camellia can be remediated and developed.
 

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hey guys isnt this area highly contaminated??? how will they and how long will it take to clean, will it be safe after.

the oil refinery is close by i think?
 

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hey guys isnt this area highly contaminated??? how will they and how long will it take to clean, will it be safe after.

the oil refinery is close by i think?
Camellia soil is ridiculously contaminated with asbestos (thanks James Hardie) and various other toxins. Many of the slabs currently in place, such as the one between the train line, warehouses on Grand Ave and the river, are not to be touched. James Hardie really f***ed the area with asbestos, reaching as far north as Old Saleyards Reserve in Nth Parra. Also, the buildings bordered by Sorrell St, Victoria Rd and Ross St (right next to Entrada Coles) are also sitting on asbestos deposits where some type of ground cover must be maintained at all times, eg lawn, or failing that, concrete.

Camellia/Clyde have an area that's a significantly larger than Rhodes and Breakfast Point combined. I reckon it would easily take a decade of solid work to sort it out but I'm guessing no one wants to pay for it.
 

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Although shelved, Think tanks are still having fun discussing Camellia...which is fun for everyone.

https://www.news.com.au/finance/eco...d/news-story/ed86763b74d4ea993d124ab8aeebbfd9

The Sydney suburb with such a filthy past it needs to be renamed

Benedict Brook
news.com.au AUGUST 23, 2019 8:29AM

It’s minutes from the train and has water views, yet even its fans say this suburb has a big problem only a drastic change will fix.

On the upper reaches of Sydney Harbour, there’s a tree-fringed suburb with riverside views within walking distance of one of Australia’s largest business and retail districts and historic buildings a stone’s throw away.

Half an hour from Sydney’s CBD and soon to have a fancy new tram rolling through it, Camellia might sound flowery but it’s had a pungent past.

Planning big wigs are now keen on it becoming a new home hotspot, but fear the neighbourhood has such a grim and filthy background that the only way to persuade people to move in will be to rename it.

“There’s nothing nice about it,” said one.

The concept is one of a series of demands from the Western Sydney Leadership Dialogue, which today launched its strategy for the so-called “central city”, an area of 1.5 million people that surrounds Parramatta in western Sydney.

The Dialogue, a group that brings together public and private sector bodies to focus on the issues facing the city’s west, also said $5 billion should be ploughed into a new Metro line from the CBD to Parramatta.
It also wants planning to begin on a north-south rail line and for broadcaster SBS to move its headquarters to the area.

Speaking to news.com.au, the Dialogue’s chairman Christopher Brown said it was stating the “bleeding obvious” that SBS should up sticks from its current home in the ritzy north shore to one of the most multicultural parts of Sydney.

He also said a “city deal” should be created for the Parramatta and Sydney Olympic Park precinct, similar to one already in place for the area around the new Western Sydney Airport.

Based on a similar concept in Britain, it brings a swath of government bodies and other stakeholders together.


Camellia, in Sydney's west, is ideally situated close to Parramatta and lots of transport. Picture: Google Maps.Source:Supplied


OK, it’s hardly Central station but Camellia station is a thing. Picture: AAP Image/Carmela Roche.Source:News Corp Australia

NOTHING NICE ABOUT CAMELLIA

The Dialogue has predicted the central city’s population will grow to 2.1 million by 2036, and those extra 600,000 people — about the population of the Gold Coast — will need to live somewhere.

However, there are concerns few will want to live in Camellia, a suburb on the southern shore of the Parramatta River, unless something drastic changes.

That’s despite it lying next to the iconic Rosehill Racecourse, just down the road from the historic Elizabeth and Experiment farms and boasting its own railway station. The future Parramatta light rail will also swing through the suburb on its way between Westmead and Carlingford.

But Mr Brown said while the suburb might be named after a flower, it has a distinctly stinky stigma due to the suburb’s heavy industrial and polluted past.

“There’s the old Shell oil refinery, the old James Hardie’s asbestos factory. There’s nothing nice about it,” he told news.com.au.


Come for the cheap prices, stay for the post industrial landscape. Picture: Wikimedia/Saberwyn.Source:Supplied

“But Camellia is also on the edge of the Parramatta CBD and is next to Rosehill Gardens Racecourse where people have been backing a winner for 100 years.”

The Dialogue has suggested splitting Camellia in two. The eastern portion, where the pollution and stains from the Clyde Oil Refinery which closed in 2012 still linger, would remain industrial. Indeed, a major fuel terminal operates to this day as well as a waste transfer and recycling plant.

However, over time, it would transition into a “green tech” park.

“As fuel markets and waste management evolve over time, it would transform from the most degraded part of Sydney into a home for eco-fuel and sustainable energy research and production,” the report said.

The western portion of Camellia would become “an ambitious mixed use riverfront precinct” with scores of housing. To sweeten the pill of moving to a former industrial area, this section would be renamed “Rosehill Gardens” after the racecourse.

Why not, said Mr Brown? After all, it’s happened before.

“Look what we’ve done in turning around Homebush, which includes Sydney Olympic Park. That was an abattoir and an armaments factory with an industrial riverbank that has now been remediated and populated.

“The same happened at Rhodes, Camellia is the last part.”


Welcome to sunny Camellia, one of Sydney’s least loved suburbs. Picture: Google Maps.Source:Supplied


The plan is to name part of the suburbs after the iconic Rosehill Gardens Racecourse close by. Picture: AAP Image/Simon Bullard.Source:AAP

As well as the multi-billion Metro West line, that is proposed to connect the city to Parramatta via Sydney Olympic Park, Mr Brown said planning should start on a north-south rail link that would connect Kogarah in the St George region with the Hills District via Parramatta.

“All of Sydney is beset by a lack of north south connections, we’ve had 200 years of everything being centred on Martin Place (in the Sydney CBD) and that can’t go on.”

An underground rail link between Parramatta and Epping, the route of which a new line would closely follow, has been planned for, announced, scrapped and re-announced many times up to around 2012.

“The Epping to Parramatta line should have happened and we need to fix that mistake now.”


Once an abattoir, Sydney Olympic Park is now thriving.Source:News Corp Australia

MOVE SBS

Mr Brown also called on SBS to move from its current home in Artarmon on Sydney’s north shore to the central city area where 70 per cent of residents were either born overseas themselves or their parents were.

“You can’t have the national multicultural broadcaster in one of the most monoculture suburbs in Australia.

“Moving SBS to the middle of multicultural Sydney is bleeding obvious. Artarmon doesn’t need SBS — Bankstown does.”
 
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