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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Sheraton Imperial KL to get facelift
By Vasantha Ganesan
BusinessTimes
June 25 2007


Once upgraded to a Starwood Luxury Collection brand, Sheraton hopes to garner a much higher average room rate as it taps into the upscale leisure and corporate traveller market
SHERATON Imperial Kuala Lumpur is set to undergo a RM42 million facelift as the hotel moves to upgrade to a Starwood Luxury Collection brand.

Luxury Collection, described as a lifestyle brand, is a group of unique hotels and resorts offering exceptional service to an elite clientele.

There are only 25 Luxury Collection hotels among 864 Starwood hotels worldwide and Sheraton Imperial has been chosen to join this elite list.

The Luxury Collection hotels and resorts are distinguished by magnificent decor, spectacular settings, impeccable service and the latest in modern conveniences and amenities.

Once upgraded, the hotel hopes to garner a much higher average room rate as it taps into the upscale leisure and corporate travellers.

"We started work on May 1, 2007. The work is extensive. It will be renamed under the Luxury Collection," Starwood Asia Pacific Hotels & Resorts Pte Ltd regional vice president for South-East Asia Peter Frawley said.

He added that the exact name the hotel will carry has yet to be decided.

According to Frawley, the majority of work on the nine-year hotel will be on all 398 rooms, the lobby, all day dining and the ballroom.

The hotel occupancy is now predominantly the corporate/ meeting, incentive, convention, exhibition (mice) market, while 20 per cent is leisure business, mostly from Europe.

"Once we finish the renovations by year-end, it will be a Luxury Collection. We would like to take it (rates) a step up," he said.

The Sheraton Imperial is equally owned by Indonesia's Rajawali and Starwood.

Starwood Hotels and Resorts operates eight hotels in Malaysia.

The other hotels are Sheraton Langkawi Beach Resort, Sheraton Subang Hotel and Towers, The Westin Kuala Lumpur, The Westin Langkawi Resort & Spa, Sheraton Labuan, Le Meridien Kuala Lumpur and Le Meridien Kota Kinabalu.

All the Starwood hotels in Malaysia, with the exception of the two Westin hotels, are undergoing or will undergo renovation or refurbishment.

"The Sheraton Subang Hotels and Tower is looking at renovation. The new owner, Tan Sri David Chiu, is a visionary and has some ideas. We have some architects looking at it now.

"The extent of the renovation has not been finalised and it would be premature to put a value to it," Frawley said.

He added that Sheraton Langkawi Beach Resort, will be upgrading 81 rooms, while Sheraton Labuan, has an interior designer looking at what work needs to be done at the hotel.

Meanwhile, Le Meridien Kuala Lumpur is doing a renovation of their restaurants and Le Meridien Kota Kinabalu will add a spa.
 

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Vision City is on the way,
with the rise of the Asian Heritage Row beside.
it's about time for them to make it ELITE!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sheraton Imperial KL to get facelift
By Vasantha Ganesan
BusinessTimes
June 25 2007


SHERATON Imperial Kuala Lumpur is set to undergo a RM42 million facelift as the hotel moves to upgrade to a Starwood Luxury Collection brand.

Luxury Collection, described as a lifestyle brand, is a group of unique hotels and resorts offering exceptional service to an elite clientele.

There are only 25 Luxury Collection hotels among 864 Starwood hotels worldwide and Sheraton Imperial has been chosen to join this elite list.

The Luxury Collection hotels and resorts are distinguished by magnificent decor, spectacular settings, impeccable service and the latest in modern conveniences and amenities.

Once upgraded, the hotel hopes to garner a much higher average room rate as it taps into the upscale leisure and corporate travellers.

"We started work on May 1, 2007. The work is extensive. It will be renamed under the Luxury Collection," Starwood Asia Pacific Hotels & Resorts Pte Ltd regional vice president for South-East Asia Peter Frawley said.

He added that the exact name the hotel will carry has yet to be decided.

According to Frawley, the majority of work on the nine-year hotel will be on all 398 rooms, the lobby, all day dining and the ballroom.

The hotel occupancy is now predominantly the corporate/ meeting, incentive, convention, exhibition (mice) market, while 20 per cent is leisure business, mostly from Europe.

"Once we finish the renovations by year-end, it will be a Luxury Collection. We would like to take it (rates) a step up," he said.

The Sheraton Imperial is equally owned by Indonesia's Rajawali and Starwood.

Starwood Hotels and Resorts operates eight hotels in Malaysia.

The other hotels are Sheraton Langkawi Beach Resort, Sheraton Subang Hotel and Towers, The Westin Kuala Lumpur, The Westin Langkawi Resort & Spa, Sheraton Labuan, Le Meridien Kuala Lumpur and Le Meridien Kota Kinabalu.

All the Starwood hotels in Malaysia, with the exception of the two Westin hotels, are undergoing or will undergo renovation or refurbishment.

"The Sheraton Subang Hotels and Tower is looking at renovation. The new owner, Tan Sri David Chiu, is a visionary and has some ideas. We have some architects looking at it now.

"The extent of the renovation has not been finalised and it would be premature to put a value to it," Frawley said.

He added that Sheraton Langkawi Beach Resort, will be upgrading 81 rooms, while Sheraton Labuan, has an interior designer looking at what work needs to be done at the hotel.

Meanwhile, Le Meridien Kuala Lumpur is doing a renovation of their restaurants and Le Meridien Kota Kinabalu will add a spa.

Hotel Renovations - May 1 to December 31, 2007
Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide

From May 1 to December 31, 2007, Sheraton Imperial Kuala Lumpur will be under refurbishment of all rooms. Works will be carried out from 9am to 6pm Monday to Sunday. During this time the hotel will endeavor to keep noise to a minimum.

From the July 1 to October 31, 2007, the all day dining room, Botanica Brasserie will be closed for major renovations. The hotel expects that there will be some noise disruption during the work hours of 9am to 6pm, Monday to Sunday.

From August to November 30, 2007, the swimming pool located on the 5th floor will be closed for renovations.
 

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Check in for comfort
By SYIDA LIZTA AMIRUL IHSAN

05 March, 2008


Jet-setting business travellers may think nothing of hotel rooms, but to SYIDA LIZTA AMIRUL IHSAN, a hotel room is a respite from the real world. IT has been said, countless times, that frequent business travellers hate hotel rooms, despite the many stars a hotel boasts and the hospitality industry’s unstoppable attempt to make hotel stays as homely and as comfortable as possible.

There is no place like home, so they say.

Obviously, I don’t travel often enough. I love hotel rooms. Maybe it’s the room service, the sturdy bed or the powerful air-conditioning, but I sure have a thing for hotel rooms. And if the service is impeccable, all the better.

Four years ago, on an assignment to Berlin, Germany, I had asked one of the employees of the Grand Hyatt where I stayed, to get me a lint roller. My white shirt was covered with black fibres from my winter jacket and it looked awful.

She didn’t speak much English. I didn’t understand a word of German (except danke schon, which means thank you). But five minutes later she was at my door with a lint roller that prevented me from looking like some black, furry animal had rolled all over the contents of my suitcase. That, to me, is good service.

So when Hotel Imperial Kuala Lumpur was unveiled from what was previously known as Sheraton Imperial Kuala Lumpur, I was excited to “try out” the rebranded hotel.

The total renovation cost RM38.4 million and work began in May last year. I wanted to see what had been improved.

Check-in was super-smooth. No waiting. Zadiana, the front office attendant, was clad in a kebaya patterned like a colourful Japanese painting.

The rest of the crew there were in traditional attire, to mark the launch and dinner that would take place later that night.

She was friendly enough to ask how I was and even accompanied me to my executive floor on level 33. The room, while not spanking new, was welcoming.

The new refurbishment saw more Asian elements injected, so there were cushions in orange and green in a fabric that felt like Thai silk.

The 385 rooms, according to the press release, feature designs inspired by Malaysia’s colourful landscape, culture and people. Fresh, crisp colours and clean transitional lines welcome guests as they open the door.

There was a plate of pralines waiting for me and just in case I thought them too sweet, there was also a plate of fresh raspberries that made me squint from being stingingly sour.

The raspberry-praline combo was a nice touch, but I prefer a fruit basket, though it’s much more traditional and well, ordinary. But at least the fruits would make quick, fulfilling bites.

So, what did I like about the room?

The walk-in closet, for one. It’s next to the bathroom, but not along the narrow walkway to the entrance, so that you don’t have to unscramble your belongings along the corridor while your partner, friend or child has to navigate past you to walk to the door.

The closet has a table you can put your suitcases on, drawers, extra pillows, shoe polish and ironing board. Now you can unpack without obstructing anyone.

The Sony Bravia TV on the wall is another plus point. TV sets in hotel rooms should no longer be stored in those TV cupboards, but mounted on the wall, considering TV has gotten significantly slimmer now.

Each room is also equipped with wi-fi and broadband connectivity, a hospitality port which enables guests to connect personal laptop, their iPods or other entertainment units to be viewed on the 40-inch LCD television.

Oh, and there’s a DVD player that allows guests to play their favourite movie. It’s a nice touch. I watched Tim Burton’s classic, Edward Scissorhands, a dark, sad movie about human judgement and the bane of being different.

Some RM4.8 million was spent on Essence, the all-day dining restaurant that was previously known as Botanica Brasserie. It now looks unmistakably Asian, from the red wooden chairs, the pillars of wooden blocks and the robust, vibrant play with tiles on the wall.

The sight of red all over the restaurant needs getting used to, especially when you often see hotel coffee houses with neutral shades like white and beige. But Essence was tastefully done and when you look down from the second floor, you can see the spiral dessert bar in bold red. Beautiful.

The breakfast selection, although not exactly expansive, is enough. There’s an organic section and a fruit bar (where you can mix any fruit juice available that day) for the health-conscious.

As for the rest of us, there is everything else: Bread, eggs, noodles, dim sum, cakes and pastries. You can easily make it a brunch instead of just breakfast. The food is fresh. No complaints there.

Sadly, the same food quality cannot be said about the room service. I ordered oxtail soup, which was tasty enough to eat, but lacked oomph. The onion soup was way too bland; it tasted like boiled onions with just some spices thrown in.

Suddenly, I had a craving for the French onion soup from Banquet, or maybe even the onion gravy from Panir’s (a stall in front of my office) that is simple and delicious.

The nasi goreng was so-so. The spicy wedges were hot and tasty, but one cannot survive only on potatoes, yes?

Still, for all it was worth, the hotel stay * with its convenience all in one room * was a delightful respite from the pulsating, hectic life downstairs manifested by the gridlock along Jalan Sultan Ismail.

So much so that when I exit the carpark, I found myself sighing, “Ah, back to the real world.”

Now I know why I love hotel rooms. It’s a little cocoon that I stay in to get myself centred before I brave the world again.
 

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It was always a luxury collection hotel. The problem now is there are 2 hotel imperial in KL. The 5 star and the 3 star at changkat bukit bintang. Guests of the 5 star one have complained that the taxis have been sending them to the wrong hotel in Bukit Bintang.

That's not very smart to confuse guests like that. Heard they knew they was another hotel imperial in town and yet they decided to drop the Sheraton name.

There are other luxury collection hotels that still have the Sheraton name.
 
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