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Should the Halifax CBD be moved?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 33.3%
  • No

    Votes: 12 66.7%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Should downtown Halifax be moved? mabey to the spring garden area. I think if the downtown be moved to an area that is not in front of the harbour and not in the central histroric area mabey alot more proposals would go threw and hight ristrictions would be no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

By maxcormier at 2008-05-19

I think the area in the red would be a perfect area for a new downtown rather that the curent downtown in blue.


By maxcormier at 2008-05-19

as you can see the area already has a small skyline itself.
 

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People ask this question from time to time but it doesn't make much sense to me. Obviously the current office buildings are not all going to be torn down and rebuilt somewhere else, and new proposals can go wherever.

Your picture also shows that the Spring Garden area is already quite built up. In fact, it's no less built up than the downtown as a whole, although it is more residential (nevertheless, Park Lane and the white building in the picture are office and the corner brick building is a hotel).

I think anything from Cogswell to Inglis and West to Robie should be considered "downtown" for zoning purposes. The whole district is already quite built up.
 

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The idea of a new downtown is great by me, but SpringGarden already has it's own theme. I've always thought north end, between the bridges and against the water. I know this is Canadian Forces land, but with low residential behind it, it seems logical. Can someone fill me in?
 

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I just curious, if you moved downtown, what would become of the old one? How would we reuse the older buildings?
It's not about moving what exists already, its about creating a new place for developments without the rigid planning laws. The current downtown is nearly all heritage property, and because of views from Citadel Hill, tall buildings are generally not allowed. This is why we need to designate a new "downtown", an area where developers can build large, and where Halifax can express a modern side. Its an especially interesting topic becuase there are plenty of areas where this could be done. Of course its mostly pipedreams, because there isn't enough interest in Halifax to fill such an area.
 

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It's not about moving what exists already, its about creating a new place for developments without the rigid planning laws. The current downtown is nearly all heritage property, and because of views from Citadel Hill, tall buildings are generally not allowed. This is why we need to designate a new "downtown", an area where developers can build large, and where Halifax can express a modern side. Its an especially interesting topic becuase there are plenty of areas where this could be done. Of course its mostly pipedreams, because there isn't enough interest in Halifax to fill such an area.

Thanks for the clarification!
 

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It's not about moving what exists already, its about creating a new place for developments without the rigid planning laws. The current downtown is nearly all heritage property, and because of views from Citadel Hill, tall buildings are generally not allowed. This is why we need to designate a new "downtown", an area where developers can build large, and where Halifax can express a modern side. Its an especially interesting topic becuase there are plenty of areas where this could be done. Of course its mostly pipedreams, because there isn't enough interest in Halifax to fill such an area.
If the goal is to make highrise construction easier by avoiding NIMBYism downtown, I think you're in for a rude awakening. If you think NIMBYs are fierce in their opposition to highrises near historic downtown buildings, just wait until someone proposes highrise office buildings close to quiet residential areas - especially those in and around the S. End that happen to include many historic victorian era houses. I suspect we'd see the biggest hullabaloo in the last half a century.

The only way to really avoid NIMBYism in the HRM would be to build out in the middle of nowhere. Even the Hfx Shopping ctr area would be too close to private homes for many. You'd likely have to go out somewhere like Bayers Lake or Dartmouth Crossing. But then, you'd be under seige from a whole other set of interests - namely environmental lobbyists who'd (quite rightly) oppose the unnecessary encroachment into nature and the resultant unsustainable traffic patterns. No, the only way to see more highrise construction in Hfx is to stand firm and FIGHT.
 

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^^ I see what you're saying, but I wasn't thinking of those areas. The naval lands north of McD's bridge, or the pier 21 district (south of DT) are, IMO, great locations. And before anyone gets upset; The forces base is important, I know, but it deserves to be relocated or redesigned, for everyones benefit. Personally I prefer to imagine a new downtown where the shipping yards are (by the piers). Clearly these docks offer important economic oppurtunities to Halifax, and it would be difficult to abandon them as the train yards are right nextdoor. But it seems inevitable to me, and a waste to have this industrial wasteland sandwiched between beatiful Point Place, and historic downtown. Everytime I see the shipping cranes, I picture equally sized office towers in their place (think about how fantasic the views are from up there). I realize the historic Victorian properties near this area owned by the wealthiest in the city, making for a very difficult process. But its important to realize that these estates are well removed from the are I'm talking about. They are elevated well above, and seperated (by train tacks). The property values would rise dramatically if this new downtown was installed, and it wouldn't even be blocking many views.
 

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This sounds good in a way, but is there enough demand in Halifax for a new downtown in addition to what's already there? And would we want one downtown to be so disconnected from the other? And as far as getting taller buildings, I suspect there would be more demand for residential than for office. Office demand could be fulfilled by building a few buildings in the 15-20 story range, so any hope of a new tallest could be best placed on an apartment or condo building. 120-130m is a realistic target.
 
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