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Should North Queensland break away from Queensland?

  • Yes

    Votes: 49 57.0%
  • No

    Votes: 37 43.0%
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I am wondering if this is a noisy minority or whether it is a real 'threat'. Personally I think it would be a stupid idea and Queensland should stay the size and shape it is (with maybe the exception of gaining Northern NSW but this would never happen). I personally think that, although many of the resources are in that part of the state, they would immediately understand why they are not getting the amount of money they want. Regional Queensland currently gets more $ per capita from the state government than the Metropolitan areas do. They have nothing to complain about.

Push for separation as Queensland splits
By Peter Morley
June 16, 2007 02:00am



QUEENSLANDERS may be united when it comes to State of Origin football but up north there is growing discontent about the way Brisbane governs.
Federal and state politicians and the North Queensland Self Government League are pushing for the north to become the nation's seventh state.

Queensland should be divided by the 22nd parallel with the boundary running just south of Sarina on the coast to the Northern Territory border between Boulia and Mount Isa, league spokesman Laurie Fabrellas said.

And the capital should be at Sellheim, near Charters Towers, to overcome rivalry between Mackay, Townsville and Cairns, he said.

Mr Fabrellas said rather than bickering over local authority boundaries, North Queenslanders should move to govern themselves - a step that would require a plebiscite and then a referendum.

He is writing to Prime Minister John Howard asking that the view of Queenslanders be tested in a plebiscite held with this year's federal election.

"All I want is for the people to have a say," said Mr Fabrellas, a foundation member of the decades-old league, whose first motto was "new state by 1988".

Now the motto is: "It is never too late to have a new state."

Mr Fabrellas said the north produced much of Queensland's wealth but was dominated by the southeast, which now wanted to say how its councils should run and to steal its water.

"Instead of us sending Burdekin water down there, people around Brisbane should be coming up here where the front door is always unlocked," the Ayr cane farmer said.

The north was under-represented in the state and federal parliaments and towns such as Cooktown were further away from Brisbane than Brisbane was from Tasmania.

But with the exception of Townsville's Tony Mooney, mayors of major provincial cities oppose a separate state.

Cr Mooney said he had always been a passionate supporter of the idea but he doubted that it would occur in his lifetime.

"There is no doubt that up here we see ourselves as quite separate, even having our own sporting teams competing nationally, " Cr Mooney said.

The separate state idea was rejected as "absolute nonsense and unrealistic" by Cairns mayor Kevin Byrne, who once lost the city's top civic job after amalgamation with the then Mulgrave Shire.

Mount Isa Mayor Ron McCullough agreed with Cr Byrne that the north suffered unfairly at the expense of the southeast.

Julie Boyd, Mackay's mayor, said: "It is highly unlikely that this (separation) will eventuate as the issue of being over-governed is regularly raised within the community."

Nationals MP for Charters Towers Shane Knuth and Independent Kennedy MHR Bob Katter disagreed, saying forced amalgamations were the "last straw" for north Queenslanders who wanted "out" of the existing state.

Mr Knuth said: "A new state would mean local people making local decisions and receiving our fair share of the huge wealth that is derived from around here but goes south."

Mr Katter said while Mr Fabrellas was the "spiritual father" of the new state movement, he expected the main push would come from a steering group of politicians and councillors.

"We are aware of the constitutional difficulties associated with establishment of a new state but one way or another there will be a universal vote," he said.

But Premier Peter Beattie has blown the whistle on the idea.

"We are one Queensland and I do not take any push for separation seriously, " he said.

A split Queensland would create serious financial problems for his Government, which relies heavily on revenue generated from Bowen Basin coal and other minerals in the northwest.

Queensland Resources Council chief executive Michael Roche said the infrastructure challenges in north and northwest would remain, regardless of any change in administrative structures.
 

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the one
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its fair to say the north part of Queensland deserve their share of investment instead of the funds being funded mainly around Brisbane.However Brisbane will suffer hard if this happens in the short term and when the mining boom ends in the long term north Queensland has no where to turn hence, Brisbane is also essential to its economy as it isn't diversified enough.
 

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No, it should be split in three.
 

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^^ Federalism is a great system for a country with the geographic and demographic challenges facing Australia. You think that rural communities are overlooked by State Capitals? Or that the country is overly Sydney-centric now? Imagine what it would be like with only one capital city overseeing the whole country....
It works well IMO, there just needs to be better delineation between the powers of the States and the Federal Gov't.
It also provides heathy, productive competition between the States, to keep Australia internationally competitive....
 

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LOL Yeh split Queensland, then Victoria will remain the 2nd most populated state for a lot longer!
 

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Crazy young doge man
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This is almost as stupid an idea as when whingers in WA who want to become there own country:nuts: :bash:
 

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When I won an academic prize long, long ago in my high-school years, I spent the money buying four books: "Sydneyside Scenery" (I think) , which was actually an excellent text on the geography of the region, a book by Bill Harney on Central Australia (Uluru etc.), and "Australia's Open North". I forget the fourth one.

"Australia's open North" proposed a state centred on Brisbane, one on Rockhampton, one on Townsville, and one on Cairns. I know that idea won't go down well in Queensland, but look at the good old US of A ... Texas, the largest state excluding Alaska, is a 692,000 km ... Queensland is a giant in comparison.
 

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Watch my Chops
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People like to compare Australia to the USA, this is not wise. But it is wise to compare Every Australian state particularly WA, QLD, SA and TAS to Texas. Why because they were independent and federated at there own will. America made more states early on during there fast expansion westward, post this there has been just a little activity.

Australia was divided into three parts as we know Tasmania then NSW then WA. NSW was more of an original claim to allot of land that latter was divided by numerous other colonies. WA was the second claim but joined the Federation untouched due to its harsh environment and its distance from Sydney. The State Parliament(s) of Australia were established before Federation and thus had sovereign protected rights.

If for instance WA had created States within itself before hand (what would have been a bold move). The Federal constitution would have been written to include this level of Government; this possibly could have lead to these entities breaking away from WA and joining the Federation or what more probably would have been a Confederation as separate States.

Australia’s states are a lot like Texas and won’t be broken any time soon. I’ve always thought the Federation was rushed and ill conceived.
 

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Always been a political theory of mine that Queensland should make Rockhampton its State Capital, might help cool this discontent somewhat.
 

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^^ Interesting idea which has merit. Most US states have their capital in a smaller city, rather than the main commercial centre.
 

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^
And what do they gain from this? Very little I would argue - the major reason they havn't changed besides the historic context (and keep in mind that several states did change their capitals to more populus cities in the past, including the last with Oklahoma City in 1910) is the excessive expenditure involved in shifting the capital.

Two-Penny Prince said:
Always been a political theory of mine that Queensland should make Rockhampton its State Capital, might help cool this discontent somewhat.
A political theory based on what?

This kind of thing happens every year or so, nothing ever happens.
 

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I don't think it's a bad idea. Brisbane seems very far away from North Qld, and Brisbane is actually closer to Sydney (in real terms - i.e. distance - not to mention socially and culturally) than it is to North Qld. Townsville is basically seen as the unofficial capital of North Qld anyway, so why not make it official?

If there were to be another state, I would say that Townsville would be the best contender for capital, by far. It's a far more diverse city than either Cairns or Mackay - more of a 'real' city - and more central, too.
 
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