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Mostly Sane
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently coming across this remarkable photo of Minneapolis in 1974 when Philip Johnson's IDS Center was finished, I wondered what other striking historical photos of Midwestern skylines might be out there.

Ideally, showing the beginning of the transformation of your city into what it is today.
(e.g. Detroit in the year the Renaissance Center was built, or St. Louis the day the arch was finished.)

In this case, the IDS at the time was sometimes referred to as the "monolith" from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

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Cory
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This is of University Park in Indianapolis circa 1920:


This is Indianapolis in 1969:


1980:
 

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Milwaukee circa early 1950s:


Credit: Wisconsin Historical Society.

2007:


Credit: KCPhotos.com
 

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Just south of Kansas City's downtown overlooking Union Station and Crown Center. 1930, 2000, 2007, respectively.
Credit for arranging those three shots goes to GRID from kcrag.



 

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Mostly Sane
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
HOLD IT, WAIT!!!!

:) :) :)

What I was really interested in was photos that showed the beginning of the transformation of your city from what it was (whether that be the 1940's, 50's, 60's, 70's, or 80's) into what it is now.

Yes, there are tons of historic photos of Midwestern skylines.

I was just wondering about a beautiful, striking photo that showed "the beginning of the end" of that historic skyline, compared to a more modern photo i.e. The quintessential photo(s) that reveal how your city leapt from historical roots into a more modern sensibility. If that's at all possible.

Maybe it's not possible for some cities. I used the Minneapolis photo to show the "beginning of the end" of Minneapolis' historic period, and it's beginning as a modern metropolis.

Again, I'd reiterate the value of two possible examples: The day the Renaissance Center opened in Detroit, and the Gateway Arch opened in St. Louis. Maybe another would be a shot from the period when Key Tower was finished in Cleveland.

Do you see what I mean? Basically, Is there a structure (and accompanying photo) that shows the moment when your city transformed itself into a more "modern" city?

If not, that's OK. Maybe that moment is still in the future! In that case, show us what future projects might re-shape your city into a new image of itself.

Sorry if this is unclear. I just thought this would be a fun exercise.
 

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HOLD IT, WAIT!!!!

:) :) :)

What I was really interested in was photos that showed the beginning of the transformation of your city from what it was (whether that be the 1940's, 50's, 60's, 70's, or 80's) into what it is now.

Yes, there are tons of historic photos of Midwestern skylines.

I was just wondering about a beautiful, striking photo that showed "the beginning of the end" of that historic skyline, compared to a more modern photo i.e. The quintessential photo(s) that reveal how your city leapt from historical roots into a more modern sensibility. If that's at all possible.

Maybe it's not possible for some cities. I used the Minneapolis photo to show the "beginning of the end" of Minneapolis' historic period, and it's beginning as a modern metropolis.

Again, I'd reiterate the value of two possible examples: The day the Renaissance Center opened in Detroit, and the Gateway Arch opened in St. Louis. Maybe another would be a shot from the period when Key Tower was finished in Cleveland.

Do you see what I mean? Basically, Is there a structure (and accompanying photo) that shows the moment when your city transformed itself into a more "modern" city?

If not, that's OK. Maybe that moment is still in the future! In that case, show us what future projects might re-shape your city into a new image of itself.

Sorry if this is unclear. I just thought this would be a fun exercise.
Wouldn't you want (like a posted), then, to have photos that show the skyline just before its modern signature tower was completed?
 

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What I was really interested in was photos that showed the beginning of the transformation of your city from what it was (whether that be the 1940's, 50's, 60's, 70's, or 80's) into what it is now.
I think Milwaukee may actually be in that moment now.

The largest and one of the first modern scrapers was actually built just before the city's most devastating and disastrous decline, and cannot be used to represent a positive transformation.

On the other hand, the current spate of projects, more or less corresponding with the building of the Calatrava wing of the Art Museum, (as well as Miller Park and the Casino expansion, and perhaps begun by the Third Ward renovations and Riverwalk), seems to have gathered a sustainable momentum, and truly altered the perception of the city to both residents and visitors. One hopes (or at least dreams) that this is just the beginning of a brighter, lasting, and fulfilling future. There certainly seem to be many more good things just around the corner.
 

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^^ Branson?
 

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I think Milwaukee may actually be in that moment now.

The largest and one of the first modern scrapers was actually built just before the city's most devastating and disastrous decline, and cannot be used to represent a positive transformation.

On the other hand, the current spate of projects, more or less corresponding with the building of the Calatrava wing of the Art Museum, (as well as Miller Park and the Casino expansion, and perhaps begun by the Third Ward renovations and Riverwalk), seems to have gathered a sustainable momentum, and truly altered the perception of the city to both residents and visitors. One hopes (or at least dreams) that this is just the beginning of a brighter, lasting, and fulfilling future. There certainly seem to be many more good things just around the corner.
I don't know if I can totally agree with you on this. I do agree that Milwaukee is going through it most dramatic change but towards the end of Milwaukee's most devasting and disasterous decline, two of the taller buildings in the city were built on the Milwaukee River that certainly did change the whole look and atmosphere of downtown. In fact, during this time other buildings like 1000 N Water, the Landmark Apts, and NWM were added to the skyline and they all were built within 2 or 3 years of each other, from 1989 to 1992.

Here's a pic from the 40's with the River looking North.


Here it is now.


Here's looking south in 1979


Here it is now.


 
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