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Mind Reader
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China

Achang



Bai



Bonan



Blang



Bouyie



Korean



Daur



Dai



De'ang




Dongxiang



Dong



Drung



Russian



Oroqen



Ewenki


Gelao



Hani



Kazak



Hezhen



Hui



Gaoshan



Jino



Jing(Viet)



Jingpo



Kirgiz



Lahu



Li



Lisu



Lhoba



Manchu



Maonan



Moinba



Mongol



Miao



Mulam



Naxi



Nu



Pumi



Qiang




Salar



She



Shui




Tajik



Tatar



Tujia



Tu



Va



Uygur



Ozbek




Xibo



Yao



Yi



Yugur



Tibetan



Zhuang

 

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Vivat capitalismus
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Vietnam

There are 54 official ethinic communities in Vietnam,Vietnamese are accounter for 76% of the population.Here are some:

Ha Nhi (Akha)



Sila



Flower H'mong





Black H'mong





Chut



Cor



Bahnar



White Thai





Muong



and more...........................................................................................


well i think one country's diversity not only depends on how many minorities are...but on other criterias to define how open the society is,harmonity of cultures...however,i wonder are there any minority ppl in Korea coz i've never heard of....
 

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According to an online book called A Country Study: Cambodia found at the following website http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/khtoc.html ,

Ethnic Minority Groups are as follows:

1) The Cham

The Cham people in Cambodia descend from refugees of the kingdom of Champa, which once ruled much of Vietnam between Cao Ha in the north and Bien Hoa in the south. In 1471 Champa was conquered by the Vietnamese, and many Cham fled to Cambodia. ....

2) The Mon-Khmer-speaking non-Khmer highland tribes, the Kuy, Mnong, Stieng, Brao, Pear.

3) The Austronesian-speaking non-Khmer highland tribes, Rade and Jarai,

4) The Chinese

The Chinese in Cambodia represented to five major linguistic groups, the largest of which was the Teochiu (accounting for about 60 percent), followed by the Cantonese (accounting for about 20 percent), the Hokkien (accounting for about 7 percent), and the Hakka and the Hainanese (each accounting for about 4 percent). These belonging to certain Chinese linguistic groups in Cambodia tended to gravitate to certain occupations. The Teochiu, who made up about 90 percent of the rural Chinese population, ran village stores, controlled rural credit and rice-marketing facilities, and grew vegetables. In urban areas they were often engaged in such enterprises as the import-export business, the sale of pharmaceuticals, and street peddling. The Cantonese, who were the majority Chinese group before the Teochiu migrations began in the late 1930s, lived mainly in the city. Typically, the Cantonese engaged in transportation and in construction, for the most part as mechanics or carpenters. The Hokkien community was involved in import-export and in banking, and it included some of the country's richest Chinese. The Hainanese started out as pepper growers in Kampot Province, where they continued to dominate that business. Many moved to Phnom Penh, where, in the late 1960s, they reportedly had a virtual monopoly on the hotel and restaurant business. They also often operated tailor shops and haberdasheries. In Phnom Penh, the newly-arrived Hakka were typically folk dentists, sellers of traditional Chinese medicines, and shoemakers.
Distinction by dialect group also has been important historically in the administrative treatment of the Chinese in Cambodia.

Generally, relations between the Chinese and the ethnic Khmer were good. There was some intermarriage, and a sizable proportion of the population in Cambodia was part Sino-Khmer, who were assimilated easily into either the Chinese or the Khmer community. Willmott assumes that a Sino-Khmer elite dominated commerce in Cambodia from the time of independence well into the era of the Khmer Republic.

The Vietnamese

The Vietnamese of Cambodia concentrated in Phnom Penh, and in Kandal, Prey Veng, and Kampong Cham provinces. The Khmer have shown more antipathy toward the Vietnamese than toward the Chinese or toward their other neighbors, the Thai. Several factors explain this attitude. The expansion of Vietnamese power has resulted historically in the loss of Khmer territory. The Khmer, in contrast, have lost no territory to the Chinese and little to the Thai. No close cultural or religious ties exist between Cambodia and Vietnam. The Vietnamese fall within the Chinese culture sphere, rather than within the Indian, where the Thai and the Khmer belong. The Vietnamese differ from the Khmer in mode of dress, in kinship organization, and in many other ways--for example the Vietnamese are Mahayana Buddhists. Although Vietnamese lived in urban centers such as Phnom Penh, a substantial number lived along the lower Mekong and Basak rivers as well as on the shores of the Tonle Sap, where they engaged in fishing.

Other Groups

Most the Europeans of Cambodia lived in Phnom Penh and served as technical advisors to the Cambodian government, or they worked for Western businesses.

Most of the Indians of Cambodia lived in Kampong Cham and often were involved in moneylending and in small businesses, such as those that sold books and cloth.

A small Burmese minority, the Kola, was found in unspecified numbers in the gem-mining areas of Batdambang and Rotanokiri provinces.

There are also other ethnic minority groups to include the Laotians, the Thais, the Malaysians, and the Arabs/Pakistanis/Egyptians...
 

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Life is Here!
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some philippine ethnic:

ivatan






maguindanao




bagobo






manobo

 

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Iron horse rider dlx
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4,278 Posts
Thailand

Thai Yai from Burma

Thai Lue from Yunnan

Thai Song Dam from Vietnam

Haw Chinese

Cambodians

Indians

Lao

Mon

Malays

Phu Thai of Renu Nakhon

Sea Gypsies

"The western coast of Thailand's southern isthmus is peopled by small groups of wanderers who say they come from a mythical land called Gunung Jerai. Known locally as sea gypsies or Chao Le and to themselves as the Moken Palau or Urak Lawoi, they either roam the swallow waters of the Andaman Sea or have settled nearby shores in Phangnga, Phuket, Krabi, and Satun provinces.

They are descended by their own account from the oldest peoples of the Earth, but cursed through their own contrariness to poverty and hunger. Each group has its own version of the tale which is handed down in their own spoken language.

Their myths tell also of pirate attacks and abductions. Theirs is a grim world. Yet it has a haunting beauty when they launch a ceremonial boat twice each year to carry the souls of their departed and all evil back to their homeland. Should you see a group of young men shouldering one of these ornate boats down a southern beach, a vessel that is far more intricate and carefully made than their own workmanlike canoes, you will be at the heart of the Urak Lawoi lifestyle. When they launch their sorrows on to the water like this, they are of course pre-figuring the universal rite of washing away sins."


Hill tribes:

Among the tribes, eleven distinct groups totaling some 750,000 people have settled in Thailand. Ethnically and linguistically separate from all other groups as well as from each other, they fall into two broad categories.

Due partly to their different lifestyles - each tribe has its own distinct cultural, socio-economic and environmental niche -all these communities intersperse peacefully among each other and with the rest of Thailand's rich social tapestry.

Karen

Lawa

Khamu

H'tin

Mlabri

Hmong

Yao

Lahu

Lisu

Akha

Padaung


Source: http://www.travelthailand.com/newhtm/ethnic.htm

Sorry.. don't know where to find pics.

As in other countries there are also modern age settlers of westerners, east asians, Indians and Africans of course, but that's another story :)
 

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sleepwalker_uno said:
some philippine ethnic:

ivatan


maguindanao


bagobo





manobo
The Chinese and the Muslim Filipinos are considered minorities too. In fact, they are the country's "biggest" minority
 

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Korea has no ethnic minority. It's a pretty homogenous country with exception of a few naturalized foreigners.
 

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(ooh! one of my interests :D)

More on Philippine diversity:

There has never been one single group of "Filipino people". The population of the islands are made up of different peoples who migrated to the area in different periods. All belong to the Malayo-Polynesian/Austronesian group (the same group which migrated to the Pacific islands, New Zealand and Madagascar), but the variety in language, society and culture reflects the different time periods in which these tribes came, and the cultural, social and religious influences they had taken on. What made the Philippines so easy to conquer by the Spanish was the fact that the early Filipinos had no ties with each other, other than those of economic ties through trade. Cultures were different, and continued to be.

The spanish were amazed to find the variety of tribes in the islands. One tyeing bond the groups had was the lingua franca of Malay in inter-tribal trade.

Tagalogs from Manila in the Boxer codex (16th century)


Cebuanos from Cebu Island in the Boxer Codex


To make it easier for Anthropologists, Filipino peoples can be categorised in to several blanket terms due to cultural influence that can somewhat simplify the complicated mosaic of different nationalities:

Christian Malay
Muslim Malay
Highland tribes
Negrito (of Papuan descent)
Lumad (proto-Malayo-polynesians of Mindanao)
Mangyan
Spanish Mestizo
Chinese

These blanket terms are only a cultural guide, in reality peoples even within the same blanket terms differ (sometimes greatly) in dress, language and culture. Here are a few examples of different tribal and social groups from the Philippines. Despite their differences, they are all Filipino, and proud to be too :)

Aeta (Negrito)


Mansaka (lumad)


Boholano (Christian)


B'laan (lumad)


Bagobo (lumad)


Tausug (Muslim)


Gaddang (Igorot)


Cebuano/Sugbuanon (Christian)


Yakan (Muslim)


Bicolano (Christian)


Mangyan


Spanish Mestizo


Ibanag (Igorot)


Manuvu (lumad)


Bontok (Igorot)


Badjao (Muslim) sea nomads


Ifugao (Igorot)


Chinese Filipino

Maguindanao (Muslim)


Tboli (Lumad)


Aklanon (Christian)


Batak (Palawan)


Maranao (Muslim)


Hiligaynon (Christian)


Tinguian (Igorot)


Mandaya (Lumad)



Ilongot (Igorot)


Kalinga (Igorot)


Sama (Muslim)


Tagalog (Christian)



This website has most of the Philippine groups listed with information about each one:
http://class.csueastbay.edu/cesmith/virtmus/Philippines/Peoples/ABC.html
 
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