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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Soca, often better known to English-speakers by its Italian name of Isonzo, is often called one of Europe's most beautiful rivers. It cuts across spectacular Alpine valleys and is nicknamed "The Emerald River" because of its distinctive color. The area also has a tragic history: During WWI, about a million soldiers from Austria-Hungary, Italy, and their allies died here, on the Isonzo Front. You may have heard of Ernest Hemingway's account of this battle -- A Farewell to Arms. Today, a major museum in Kobarid (better known as Caporetto to history buffs) reminds visitors of these tragic events.

Let's begin our photo tour by taking a look at the Alpine valleys where the Soca flows:


Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: A. Fevzer and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: B. Bajzelj and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si

And now, the river itself:


Source: A. Fevzer and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.net


Source: B. Kladnik and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: T. Reiser and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.net


Source: B. Kladnik and slovenia-tourism.si


^ This is actually Tolminka, a Soca tributary
Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.net


Source: destinacije.net


Source: B. Bajzelj and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.com


Source: J. Skok and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.net


^ Tolminka again
Source: B. Kladnik and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: B. Kladnik and slovenia-tourism.si


Source: destinacije.net
 

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hlubach bubach
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:applause:
Stuuuunning :)

What is the lenght of the river ? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Bubach! The total length of the river is 138 km, of which 96 km is in Slovenia, with the rest in Italy, where it becomes much wider and flatter before flowing into the Adriatic.
 

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I come in peace \V/
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nice pics A2Zsl, it reminds me of my visit to this area in 1999 when I stayed over weekend, very nice. I stayed what was than former Yugoslavia, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia and Slovenia nearly 100 days, longest tour of duty as an journalist, my first proper war correspondence. Visited Slovenia and loved it a lot, especially Kranjska Gora, Triglav, Isonzo Valley, and so on.

Nice pIcs, reminds me of my visit, did you know even in summer on triglav temperatures are below zero or just around, I was freezing my B**s off when ve visited, and only than did stupid tour guide remember to tell us "btw the temperature is freezing 4 Celsius" lol, want forget his name Drago, if I ce him once more I'll stick him in a freezer for few hours and come back to tell him btw did you know in freezers temperatures are constantly kept at -20 Celsius, lol....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
mic of Orion,

Thanks for sharing your memories. I was listening to the radio this afternoon and -- guess what -- it was snowing on Triglav! You're right, BTW, it can get bitterly cold in the summer as well. Congats on ascending Triglav; it's said that every real Slovene should make it up there at least one in his/her life so, according to that, you're more of a Slovene than I am!

However, did you mean you were there in 1991 (since you mention it was still Yugoslavia then and you visited the place as a war correspondent)?

sts,

Yes, those were indeed tragic times. None of my relatives (that I know of) died on the front, but one of my great-grandfathers contracted meningitis there and died shortly after returning from the front. My grandmother was only five months old at the time.

Near Kobarid (you probably know it as Caporetto), there is an Italian Charnel House (a memorial with soldiers' remains) build to commemorate Italian losses in the battle. You can read more about it here. The Kobarid Museum, devoted to the Isonzo Front, is a must-see.
 

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Streetwalker
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Thanks AZ2SI for sharing parts of Slovenia with us. I learn something new each time. :yes:

Such a beautiful landscape. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
And thanks for letting me know about destinacije.net, SinCity; it's a great resource I use for almost all of my photo threads!
 

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I come in peace \V/
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AZ2SI said:
mic of Orion,

Thanks for sharing your memories. I was listening to the radio this afternoon and -- guess what -- it was snowing on Triglav! You're right, BTW, it can get bitterly cold in the summer as well. Congats on ascending Triglav; it's said that every real Slovene should make it up there at least one in his/her life so, according to that, you're more of a Slovene than I am!

However, did you mean you were there in 1991 (since you mention it was still Yugoslavia then and you visited the place as a war correspondent)?
Thanx, I went on to Triglav with little or no equipment so I wouldn't call it professional ascending, more like tour guide, lol. It took us 7-8 hours and it was very enjoyable fresh air and bit of exercise, you would be surprised to know how many elderly ppl where with us, I mean retired ppl who do this kind of stuff all the time, I was put to shame, lol...

I was in Slovenia in 1999 not 1991, in 1991 I was still in school, well completed my 6-form.
In 1999 I was just of the University (took year off to gain some life and experience before continuing my 3rd year).
I was in Region between March 1999 to June 1999, on behalf of Jane's Defence and also was doing stories for Guardian, Independent and Flight International. I was one of few freelance journalist there, so it was strange, cose I was considered nobody if I said I was freelance, and if I said I was with Jane's Defence they automatically think I am wisest man in known existence, lol and would test my knowledge of defence issues and exchanging war stories with me (for f**k sake I was barely 22, lol - got there naively believing I'll learn more about political processes, lol)

It was way cool and learned a lot about world, ppl and also learned never sleep on train if you travel in Serbia, pick pocketing there is national pastime, lol.

I was kicked out of Serbia in early March for representing imperialist foreign media and was based in Zagreb for few moths, as was most of foreign media at the time. Few of my US friends (working for US Newspapers - Newsday) ask me to join them in Slovenia, (this was already May) Nada (Slovene Lady and Translator) housed me in her, wow; massive apartment in Ljubljana and next day we all joined the Triglav tour (well we went all over it was long weekend,
and this is what I remember very vividly few of my friends trying to catch some fish with bare hands, it was way funny, suffice so say they ended up wet and pist off, I guess fish won, lol...


My tour of duty ended in late June but I was back for few weeks in August and left for good in September, I had to finish my 3rd year at uni....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow, sounds like exciting times! Thanks for sharing your memories with us. Opportunities like that don't come often, and it seems you really profited from it. About climbing Triglav -- yep, I guess it's more about will than climbing skills, but some of us lack both. ;) Triglav's North Face, however, can be a very challenging undertaking even for experienced climbers.
 
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