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Prehistory to Slavic settlement
Slovene territory was long inhabited in prehistoric times, and there is evidence of human habitation around 250,000 years ago. A pierced cave bear bone, probably the oldest known musical instrument in the world, has been discovered in Divje Babe cave near Cerkno, dating from the Würm glacial age when the area was inhabited by Neanderthals.The oldest needle, pierced bones, bone points and other artifacts belonging to the Cro-Magnon have been found in Potok Cave, a high-elevation Aurignacian (36,000 – 25,000 BP BP) site on Mount Olševa. In the Ljubljana Marshes, the remains of pile dwellings, which were constructed in the region during a period of more than 4,500 years, from 5000 to 500 BC, were discovered. They are now protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The oldest wooden wheel in the world, dated to between 5,100 and 5,350 years ago was also found here. In the transition period between the Bronze age to the Iron age, the Urnfield culture flourished. Archeological remains dating from the Hallstatt period have been found, particularly in southeastern Slovenia, among them a number of situlas in Novo Mesto, the "Town of Situlas".

In the Iron Age, present-day Slovenia was inhabited by Illyrian and Celtic tribes until the 1st century BC, when the Romans conquered the region and established the provinces of Pannonia and Noricum. What is now western Slovenia was included directly under Roman Italia as part of the X region Venetia et Histria. The Romans established posts at Emona (Ljubljana), Poetovio (Ptuj) and Celeia (Celje), and constructed trade and military roads that ran across Slovene territory from Italy to Pannonia. In the 5th and 6th centuries, the area was subject to invasions by the Huns and Germanic tribes during their incursions into Italy. After the departure of the last Germanic tribe – the Lombards – to Italy in 568, the Slavs from the East began to dominate the area, with aid from Avars. After the successful resistance against the nomadic Asian Avar rule (from 623 to 626), the Slavic people united with King Samo’s tribal confederation. The confederation fell apart in 658 and the Slavic people, located in present-day Carinthia, formed the independent duchy of Carantania. Other parts of Slovenia were again ruled by Avars before Charlemagne's victory over them in 803.

The Middle Ages to Early Modern Period
In the mid-8th century, Carantania became a vassal duchy under the rule of the Bavarians, who began spreading Christianity. Three decades later, the Carantanians were incorporated, together with the Bavarians, into the Carolingian Empire. During the same period Carniola, too, came under the Franks, and was Christianized from Aquileia. Following the anti-Frankish rebellion of Ljudevit Posavski at the beginning of the 9th century, the Franks removed the Carantanian princes, replacing them with their own border dukes. Consequently, the Frankish feudal system reached the Slovene territory.

The Magyar invasion of the Pannonian Plain in the late 9th century effectively isolated the Slovene-inhabited territory from western Slavs. Thus, the Slavs of Carantania and of Carniola began developing into an independent Slovene ethnic group. After the victory of Emperor Otto I over the Magyars in 955, Slovene territory was divided into a number of border regions of the Holy Roman Empire. Carantania, being the most important, was elevated into the Duchy of Carinthia in 976. In the late Middle Ages, the historic provinces of Carniola, Styria, Carinthia, Gorizia, Trieste and Istria developed from the border regions and incorporated into the medieval German state. The consolidation and formation of these historical lands took place in a long period between the 11th and 14th centuries, being led by a number of important feudal families, such as the Dukes of Spannheim, the Counts of Gorizia, the Counts of Celje and finally the House of Habsburg. In a parallel process, an intensive German colonization significantly diminished the extent of Slovene-speaking areas; by the 15th century, the Slovene ethnic territory was reduced to its present size.

In the 14th century, most of the territory of Slovenia was taken over by the Habsburgs. The counts of Celje, a feudal family from this area who in 1436 acquired the title of state princes, were their powerful competitors for some time. This large dynasty, important at a European political level, had its seat in Slovene territory but died out in 1456. Its numerous large estates subsequently became the property of the Habsburgs, who retained control of the area right up until the beginning of the 20th century.

At the end of the Middle Ages, the Slovene Lands suffered a serious economic and demographic setback because of the Turkish raids. In 1515, a peasant revolt spread across nearly the whole Slovene territory. In 1572-3 the Croatian-Slovenian peasant revolt wrought havoc throughout the wider region. Such uprisings, which often met with bloody defeats, continued throughout the 17th century.

Between the 18th century and the end of World War I
The Slovene Lands were part of the Illyrian provinces, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary (in Cisleithania). They encompassed Carniola, southern part of Carinthia, southern part of Styria, Istria, Gorizia and Gradisca, Trieste, and Prekmurje. Industrialization was accompanied by construction of railroads to link cities and markets, but the urbanization was limited. Due to limited opportunities, between 1880 and 1910 there was extensive emigration, and around 300,000 Slovenes (i.e., one in six) emigrated to other countries, mostly to the United States, but also to South America, Germany, Egypt, and to larger cities in the Austria-Hungary, especially Zagreb and Vienna. Despite this, the Slovene population increased significantly and became as socially differentiated as in other European nations.[citation needed] Literacy was exceptionally high, at 80 to 90 percent.


Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovenia (wikipedia)
 

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Hi folks. Newbie here. Registered to share my work with you.

I am a graphic designer/video artist from Ljubljana, Slovenia. I have always been into castles and stuff, while it always bothered me how they are being left to ruin. There are literally hundreds of decaying castles in my country, whereas they could be a point of great tourist attraction and a monument of our once great history.

I opened up a blog at Tumblr where I will do major Photoshop restoration of how-things-could-have-been ... You are most welcome to visit and see the potential in these historic monuments.

www.translovenia.tumblr.com

Cheers!
 

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hows the weather like in Slovenia around late September/October? :?
LATE SEPTEMBER
- mostly sunny, sun is not that strong anymore, leaves are falling down, beggining of the fall/autumn, could be windy. Here and there, some single day but rarely can be very hot, up to 86°F.
- also some very cold day, but rarely can appear in late september.
- average high temperature: 18°C (64°F)
- average low temperature: 7°C (45°F)

OCTOBER
- october is in Slovenia known as rainy month and as typical Fall month and also a lot of clearblue sky sun. Evertything in nature becomes yellow and brown. Nights can be pretty cold.
- when it rains, can rain all day but very peacefull with no wind and no storms. Just to watch through the window.
- in late October also a lot of times first snow can fall, but so little that almost not worth even to mention it, because the grounds are still too hot, and temperatures are not low enough.
- average high temperature: 13°C (55°F)
- average low temperature: 4°C (40°F)


Those are pictures from Fall in Slovenia and they show typical October weather in Slovenia




 

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