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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please post anything about your favorite smaller or midsize midwestern cities.

I like Springfield Missouri, it's not a big city and it's not a small town either. For city with less that 300,00 population, Springfield is considered one of the more diversed smaller cites. I have yet to find out it's ranking as far as it's progress is concerned. We have alot of develpments in this city, one of which is the building of a new regional airport terminal building, just recently the Springfield-Branson Regional Airport was changed to Springfield-Branson National airport because of an increasing number of passenger activities with connections to major cities and hubs such as Atlanta, Chicago, Reno, Denver, Detroit and many others.

Here is a link about springfield :
http://www.springfieldmo.net/

More pictures are coming up soon. Thank you.
 

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The big new thing going on here in the Dayton area is The Greene, which is going to be one of those lifestyle centers. The developer has done something in Milwaulkee called Bayshore, and something called Zona Rosa in KC (tho it sounds like Mexico City).

..its part of the ongoing re-orientation of suburban retail/office to the I-675 cooridor., which started in 1969 with the Dayton Mall opening near the I-675-I-75 intechange. I-675 wasnt compelted unitl 1987, so (aside from the Dayton mall area) there has been an ongoing boom for the last 20 years on this corridor...




It will probably make a big splash here as they are going to have some new buisnessess that we havnt seen here before, like The Cheesecake Factory.








...its under construction and is supposed to open late this summer.




Further south on I-675, near the Wilmington Pike interchange, there is another big development going in.
 

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Jeff_in_Dayton said:
The big new thing going on here in the Dayton area is The Greene, which is going to be one of those lifestyle centers. The developer has done something in Milwaulkee called Bayshore, and something called Zona Rosa in KC (tho it sounds like Mexico City).

..its part of the ongoing re-orientation of suburban retail/office to the I-675 cooridor., which started in 1969 with the Dayton Mall opening near the I-675-I-75 intechange. I-675 wasnt compelted unitl 1987, so (aside from the Dayton mall area) there has been an ongoing boom for the last 20 years on this corridor...




It will probably make a big splash here as they are going to have some new buisnessess that we havnt seen here before, like The Cheesecake Factory.








...its under construction and is supposed to open late this summer.




Further south on I-675, near the Wilmington Pike interchange, there is another big development going in.

This development truly illustrates how innovative "Country Club Plaza" in Kansas City was/is. But now history repeating itself, this second, nationwide
go around of the idea, can never match the quality (cost of materials and labor/craftsmanship), and aesthetics of
the KC outdoor city mall. I am glad some developers are following the "Lifestyle mall" trend, it makes for somewhat better suburban looking strip malls, at least more pedestrian friendly, and less large fields of black asphalt.
 

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This development truly illustrates how innovative "Country Club Plaza" in Kansas City was/is. But now history repeating itself, this second, nationwide
go around of the idea, can never match the quality (cost of materials and labor/craftsmanship), and aesthetics of
the KC outdoor city mall.
From what I understand, Country Club Plaza was somewhat integrated into the surrounding neighborhood, while this thing in Dayton is just plopped down on a vacant parcel near a freeway interchange, with absolutely no relationship with the surrounding development.

I am glad some developers are following the "Lifestyle mall" trend, it makes for somewhat better suburban looking strip malls, at least more pedestrian friendly, and less large fields of black asphalt.
Yeah, but there is a 'real' downtown not very far from this place (Dayton is not that big) that could be redeveloped as a lifestyle center, not some suburban greenfield site.

Believe it or not, the local suburb set up a TIF to subsidize this, which I, personally, find really galling, especially since the same suburb has a conventional upscale shopping mall surrounded by strip centers a few interchanges to the east and north.

It was not like they where hurting for retail or this was an abandoned site needing redevelopment.

Anyway, enough ranting.
 

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here in batesville, the big development story is this:

Mystery company eyes S. Indiana

Thousands of acres of farmland in southeastern Indiana are being considered for a huge industrial development that would employ at least 750 people and cost at least $200 million to build.

Efforts to buy land at two competing sites -- one near Greensburg and the other near Batesville -- have residents buzzing. But the company seeking the property remains a mystery to residents and local government officials.

In each community, the unidentified company is trying to buy up to 2,000 acres, and the Indianapolis law firm of Baker & Daniels is doing the bidding.

The size of the parcel has set off speculation that a major auto-parts plant, a mini-steel mill or a Toyota engine factory could move in.

Gov. Mitch Daniels said in a written statement that the land is being rounded up for a "well-known company." But he declined to identify it because doing so could "seriously damage Indiana's chances of landing this project."

Even the mayors of Greensburg and Batesville said they didn't get any details out of Daniels when he called them recently.

The company is considering several sites in Indiana and other states, according to written purchase offers delivered by Baker & Daniels staff to landowners near Greensburg and Batesville. The cities, in Decatur and Ripley counties, respectively, both lie along I-74 between Indianapolis and Cincinnati and have access to a rail line.

The company is involved in manufacturing and production, logistics and other services. It operates nationally and internationally. One letter describes it as environmentally friendly.

The company wants to buy 1,800 to 2,000 acres, said Pat Karst, vice president of Halderman Real Estate Services in Wabash. Halderman appraised all of the affected properties in Decatur and Ripley counties.

That site is so large that it could include a factory, a rail yard and several suppliers on the same grounds. By comparison, Toyota's truck plant near Evansville covers 1,100 acres and employs 4,600.

The company will make an initial investment of $200 million and plans to create a minimum of 750 "well-paying" jobs, mostly for local residents.

The entire project has a tight deadline. Halderman was told to appraise 185 parcels in three weeks, the firm's most time-pressed project ever. Landowners have until May 5 to accept the purchase offer. By July 1, the company plans to decide on a site.

Auto analysts embraced the possibility that the land could be for Toyota, noting the company already has extensive Indiana operations and has admitted its site search for an engine plant in North America has begun.

Engine plants typically employ fewer than 1,000 workers but cost more than $1 billion, including the automated machinery.

"It seems like this would be a strategic location for Toyota,'' said auto analyst Mike Wall of market researcher CSM Worldwide of Northville, Mich. "Indiana has a shot."


http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060417/NEWS02/604170378/1025/rss02
 

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Jeff, Troy is an outer ring, upscale sprawlburb in Metropolitan Detroit. It's one of the two major cities where a large chunk of Detroit's office core migrated to after it it declined, the other city being Southfield. The city has stagnated at about 81,000 persons in population.

Here in Lansing, the most expensive project going on is the expansion of Sparrow Hospital a mile east of downtown Lansing. The tower will rise 10 stories at 186' in height. There are countless other renovations and housing projects going on, but they are all mostly low-rise and expansive.

Renderings




The base of the tower, and the parking garage for the hospital, have already been constructed.




Current Construction of the Tower










Stadium District - One of the larger residential projects in Lansing with over 100+ condominium and apartment units across from Oldsmobile Park (home of the Lansing Lugnuts). It will also have significant groundfloor retail, and office space on half of the second floor.


Motor Wheel Lofts - A huge renovation of a vacant, historic factory with 120+ lofts

Before renovation


During


Prudden Place Apartments - 120 new units next door to Motor Wheels Lofts recently completed, Phase II is scheduled to start later this year.


Arbaugh Lofts - a recent renovation of a historic department store into 48 loft apartments with underground heated parking.

Before (covered in glass)


After


Printer's Row - 17 new construction condominium rowhomes




On the Grand Condominiums - expansion




East Village - 170 or so condominiums (some attached and some not) going up on the near eastside of Lansing








Now, if we could just get up a residential tower...
 

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Apparently downtown Dayton is going to get a new office building, for some health care company.

DAYTON — Construction of a $51 million office tower for CareSource Management Group at North Main Street and Monument Avenue could get under way this fall.

"This is new growth. This is a strong company," said Gwen Eberly, Dayton's acting director of economic development. "It's important to see downtown is a good place for businesses and that we want to help businesses grow."

Eberly said she'll recommended the city commission commit $500,000 toward the project for site preparation. The city also applied for $500,000 in ED/GE funds for improvements at Main and Monument.

CareSource is growing "fast and furiously," Ronald J. Parker, the Dayton-Montgomery Port Authority's president and executive director, said Friday.

The Port Authority and the city are working on plans to provide office and parking space for up to 1,200 workers in anticipation of dramatic growth by CareSource over three years, Parker said.

Construction could start as soon as September on the 300,000-square-foot building, Parker said. An 800-space parking garage would replace the 400-space garage there now.

CareSource's growth plans prompted the port authority to speed its plans to make the corner a "shovel-ready" site for a business.

"It was to be prepared for a large office user. It just so happens we have one," Parker said.

The port authority has bought one parcel for the site and has purchase contracts on three more, Parker said.

A new building is needed because CareSource's requirements can't be met in the vacant space downtown.

"We just don't have that anywhere. There will be some criticism about that," Parker said, but added, "It will be good for downtown."

The CareSource Management Group says it's committed to staying downtown, but would not comment on the site Friday.

Parker said buying more property isn't a risk for the port authority because it was already part of its plan to make the site ready for development.


No renderings or news, yet, on how tall this is going to be.

The location is on the northern end of downtown, facing the river.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just one of the Springfield MO developments:
Return of Heer's is Here

Park Central Square's icon will re-emerge with the redevelopment of the Heer's Tower as residential condominiums, office, government and retail space. Jefferson City developer Vaughn Prost is the force behind restoration of the once venerable department store that has left both a literal and symbolic gap in downtown's resurgence.

Responding to an identified need for residential condominiums for purchase to complement the rental housing available downtown, Mr. Prost in 2005 revised his original plans and will turn 32,000 square feet of the Heer's building into 23 luxury condominiums. He also has commitments for at least 150,000 feet of office-type space with the State of Missouri and the City of Springfield. The State will lease office space and the City will lease space for the Transportation Management Center, operated with the Missouri Department of Transportation, and Partnership Studio, operated by TV23, the City's government access channel.

The City is partnering as well on a 540-space parking deck to support both the Heer's Tower and the adjacent College Station project.

http://www.itsalldowntown.com/Article.asp?Filter=GenInfo&ArticleID=264
 

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This is being discussed, not a sure thing yet...at the interchange of I-675 and Wilmington Pike, suburban Dayton, the next interchange south on I-675 from that lifestyle center I proposed. On this map the gray colored development right next to the interchange already exists..a Home Depot and Target.



...part of the ongoing transformation of the I-675 corridor into Dayton's "sprawl banana", arcing around/through the southern and eastern suburbs.
 

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I appreciate the development news Jeff, but IMO Dayton is too big to be considered "small midwest city development." Being a metro of a million people, this is a city that deserves its own thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
5/2/2006
http://www.itsalldowntown.com/Article.asp?Filter=GenInfo&ArticleID=121



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Overall Master Plan


Described as a "grand civic gesture", Jordan Valley Park is designed to mix open space and buildings, water and meadows, playgrounds and plazas. The park contrasts public space and solitude, recreation and revitalization via:

Subdistricts: Resembling an hourglass, the two ends of the park are marked by large meadows held together by a narrow band of activity-filled spaces, leading to a "central green." Each area is a distinct composition of landscape, buildings and open spaces.
Edges: Edges define the park and its many spaces - not to divide or disconnect, but to provide a transition from downtown's urban environment to the natural, expressive environment of the Park.
Connections: Jordan Valley Park is about connections - the past with the future, north Springfield with south, industry with agriculture, people with nature.
Unifying Elements: Physical and symbolic references to Jordan Creek and historic Springfield will knit the elements of the park together. Artwork, gateways, streetscapes and focal points will lend powerful symbols to the varied landscape.

Jordan Valley Park is the imagination of more than 300 citizens who created a collective vision for the heart of Springfield. Their vision took hold across the community, where voters in every precinct approved a referendum to help pay for the park.

Across 250 acres of Center City, the possibilities are boundless to adapt brownfields, reuse vacant buildings and revive the trickle of a creek for which the park is named.

Within walking distance in downtown Springfield people will find:

* a quarry turned gateway
* a baseball stadium
* an arts center
* a recreational ice rink
* an exposition center
* plazas and open spaces

This information was taken from the Jordan Valley Park web site, located at http://www.springfieldmogov.org/jvp
 
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