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Macedonia
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Shame they couldn't restore it to its original condition and keep it as a museum of communism in Bulgaria. Ignoring your past - any of it - is a mistake.
I totally agree with you. Unfortunately, in the former socialist (communist) countries today is "in" to hate the socialist period and to blame it for all the miseries that happened to those states.
 

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^^
Well, in your country that certainly isn't the case.

And you and the 18-year-old communist romantic should check your facts before you talk about anything. That UFO building is owned by the Socialist Party. It's their job to restore it to its former glory. But since they don't want to spend their hard-stolen money, it will remain like this forever.
 

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Real Horrorshow
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IDGAF who owns it. Other historic buildings seem to have no problem finding funding for restoration.
I'm not a 'communist romantic'. I'm against fascism and for egalitarianism of human rights. Both left and right extremes have nothing but repugnant dogma in which only a few benefit.

Then again, eastern europeans have been brainwashed to think everything is 'communist' including keeping their buildings in tolerable shape. Don't like that? What are you, a communist? :eek:hno:
 

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Real Horrorshow
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Skopje/Скопје;120214247 said:
I totally agree with you. Unfortunately, in the former socialist (communist) countries today is "in" to hate the socialist period and to blame it for all the miseries that happened to those states.
Yeah man check your facts! It's obvious you have no idea that socialist architecture is socialist!

If only you knew that, your silly opinion of "preserving the past for the future generations to see" would change! Clearly the right option is to whitewash an entire era of history. What could possibly go wrong?
 

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IDGAF who owns it. Other historic buildings seem to have no problem finding funding for restoration.
It's a private building owned by the communists. It's their "heritage". If they DGAF, why should anyone else? Each year they organize a large gathering outside, but won't spend a dime on the building. If it's up to me, it'd be nuked (during the commie gathering).

And apparently Canadian teenage kids of Romanian immigrants believe that anyone anti-communist is a fascist. Ridiculous :lol: So much stupidity in this world.
 

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Real Horrorshow
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It's a private building owned by the communists. It's their "heritage". If they DGAF, why should anyone else? Each year they organize a large gathering outside, but won't spend a dime on the building. If it's up to me, it'd be nuked (during the commie gathering).

And apparently Canadian teenage kids of Romanian immigrants believe that anyone anti-communist is a fascist. Ridiculous :lol: So much stupidity in this world.
Why should the non-socialist give a shit about the socialist monument? Because it's an architectural icon maybe?
It's like asking why anybody should give a shit about anything that isn't related to them. It's totally ludicrous to suggest such a thing.

Keep on throwing personal insults and strawman fallacies. You are really making yourself look good.
 

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Ars longa, vita brevis
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Interesting article:

Khrushchyovka

Khrushchyovka (Russian: хрущёвка, pronounced [xruɕːɵfkə]) is a type of low-cost, concrete-paneled or brick three- to five-storied apartment building which was developed in the USSR during the early 1960s, during the time its namesake Nikita Khrushchev directed the Soviet government.

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Traditional masonry is labor-intensive; individual projects were slow and not scalable to the needs of overcrowded cities. To ameliorate a severe housing shortage, during 1947-1951 Soviet architects evaluated various technologies attempting to reduce costs and completion time... By this time, competing experimental designs were tested by real-life construction, and prefabricated concrete panels were considered superior. Other possibilities, like in situ concrete, or encouraging individual low-rise construction, were discarded... The Khrushchovka design was an early attempt at industrialised and prefabricated building, the elements (or panels) made at concrete plants and trucked to the site as needed. Elevators were considered too costly and time consuming to build, and according to Soviet health/safety standards, five stories was the maximum height of a building without an elevator. Thus, almost all Khrushyovkas have five stories.

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These buildings are found in great numbers all over the former Soviet Union (and former communist states in Eastern Europe as well). They were originally considered to be temporary housing until the housing shortage could be alleviated by mature Communism, which would not have any shortages. Khrushchev predicted the achievement of Communism in 20 years (by the 1980s). Later, Leonid Brezhnev promised each family an apartment "with a separate room for each person plus one room extra", but many people continue to live in Khrushchyovkas today...

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khrushchyovka
 

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Ars longa, vita brevis
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@ThatOneGuy: if you read the article more carefully you'll notice that those 1700 such comieblocks are only in Moscow, where they stopped building them after the '60s to focus on taller ones. The rest of Russia kept building them until the end, and you need to realize that the country is ten times more populous than the capital and that the real estate bubble that's now driving the pressure on obsolete commieblocks in Moscow doesn't exist in anywhere near the same intensity in the rest of the country. And that's not mentioning the rest of the Eastern Bloc. In Romania for example I'd be surprised if ONE was demolished.
 

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Retired Mohawk Ironworker
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The Khrushchyovka? 1300 out of around the 1700 have apparently been demolished
What replaced them?

Also, what do the 1300 and 1700 figures refer to -- individual apartments, individual buildings, or multi-building projects.

In the US, we also built and then tore down quite a few public housing units, ranging from 3 or 4 story buildings to high-rises.
 

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In my Latvia they built mostly only the brick Khrushchyovkas. And they're fairly good buildings - unlike the panel ones, these could last 150 years and are easily modifiable. Even I am living in one. They have small flats, but people sometimes buy two flats and combine them. The main problem would be the narrow staircase - it's hard to move large items through it. For example, a bicycle in everyday life or a couch when you are moving.




Above pictures from Flickr's user designdust

Nowadays their balconies are very different which gives them a chaotic feel - like something from the slum districts


Many, mainly in the regions, get renovated.

Picture from baltsunmelns.lv
 
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