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Yes Guntiimo is reer Konfuur. I love it though I dont know why Somali girls dont wear it often:eek:hno:
If you modernise it a little like we do with the diraac (as some wear a belt with it) I think more younger females would wear it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)

Koofi barawaani (Barawa Hat) - A medieval era hat, it shares similarities with the North African Fez, but instead of one monolithic colour, the Barawa hat is adorned with several colour patterns and designs:

 

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^^ Wow Great pictures Musa. Dharka noocaas ah ma 'sedex-qeyd' ayaa la dhehaa ? Fascinating pictures. We definately need to re-introduce modernised versions of those traditional clothes.

I must say that they all look very regal in those clothes :D
 

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Not really a piece of clothing, but back home it completes a man's outfit

Hangool - Staff





On my wedding day in Somalia, a friend came early to my house and presented me with a hangool, the nomadic tool for constructing corrals for livestock, forked on one end for uprooting thorn bushes and hooked on the other end for dragging them into place. "You cannot become a reer [household, lineage, clan] without a hangool" my friend explained. The hangool, he said, was a traditional wedding gift for a man in Somalia. This ostensibly simple and functional tool, then, is also employed as a phallic symbol for manhood, representing the aspiration of every Somali man to be named the mythical head of a lineage segment in the distant future, generations after his death.

Katheryne S. Loughran, Foundation for Cross Cultural Understanding, Washington, D.C. (1986), page 11
 

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It is a tradition in Somali culture that a new bride remains in her home
for a week after her wedding. It is customary in South Somalia that on the seventh day there is a women’s party for the bride called the Shaashsaar.

The guests circle the bride singing Geeraro and Buraanbur (Somali Poetry) and each lays a scarf (shaash) on her head, while burning Uunsi(fragrant incense)The scarves can be of many patterns and colours and are a sign of a woman being married.






 
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