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Cape Town — South African economists and researchers may see Brazil as the economy South Africa should look to emulate and learn from, but a report released by Brazil's National Confederation of Industry (CNI) reveals that South Africa is actually more competitive than the South American nation.

The report, released last week, also ranks South Africa second out of 14 countries, most of them emerging economies, when it comes to the sophistication of its banking system.

According to "Competition Brazil: A comparison with selected countries" ("Competividade Brasil 2010: Compara±ao com Pa¡ses Selecionados"), South Africa is slightly more competitive than Brazil with more affordable and available capital, better infrastructure, less taxes and a slightly better macro economic climate than the South American country.

However, Brazil has cheaper and more available manual labour, a better micro economic climate and is more innovative than South Africa.

The report compares 14 countries on a range of measures such as availability and cost of manual labour, availability and cost of finance, macro and micro economic climate, education and innovation and technology.

These countries are: Australia, Canada, Russia, Mexico, China, Poland, Spain, India, Korea, Brazil, South Africa, Colombia, Chile and Argentina.

The report makes use of figures from existing global studies such as the World Bank's Doing Business report, the Institute for Management Development's Competitiveness Yearbook and the World Economic Forum's (WEF) Competitiveness Report.

Out of the 14 countries South Africa has the second most sophisticated financial market, just behind Canada and ahead of Australia and Brazil.

South Africa has the second lowest effective business tax rate (business taxes as a percentage of company profits), behind Chile, with businesses in Brazil, Colombia and Argentina being taxed the heaviest.

South Africa is ranked fourth out of 14 countries on the ease of accessing capital, making it easier to access a loan here than in India, Colombia, Brazil, China, Korea, Russia, but more difficult than Australia and Chile.

When it comes to the cost of capital South Africa is ranked fourth out of 13 countries, with financial institutions that are more affordable for local inhabitants than those in Russia, China and Korea, but more expensive than Canada, India, Chile and Australia.

Ranked sixth out of the 14 countries, South Africa's transport infrastructure is better than that of China, India, Mexico, Brazil, Poland but behind that of Korea and Chile.

South Africa is ranked seventh out of the 14 countries with foreign direct investment (FDI) as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2008.

South Africa's FDI of over three percent of GDP puts it ahead of Poland, Canada and Brazil, but behind Chile (10 percent) and Australia and Colombia and Russia (over four percent).

However, South Africa fares badly when it comes to the cost and availability of labour.

South Africa is ranked last among 11 of the countries when it comes to the cost and availability of its labour.

In the availability of manual labour South Africa is ranked last out of the 14 countries and is also the only country of the 14 whose labour force shrunk in 2008 (by over three percent compared to

India where the workforce grew by almost three percent).

But when it comes to the cost of manual labour South Africa is ranked fifth out of 11 countries, with its labour priced at about the same level as South Korea, more affordable than Poland, Russia and Mexico, but more expensive than Brazil, India and China.

The report also reveals that South African factory workers (ranked seven out of 11 countries) are better paid than those in Brazil, China, India, Poland and Mexico - but less than those in Korea.

However, when it comes to productivity South African workers are ranked eighth out of 13 countries, more productive than Russia, Colombia, Brazil, China and India, but less productive than Korea, Chile and Mexico.

But South Africa ranks poorly when it comes to education: with only India fairing worse when it comes to the percentage of matriculants in higher education in (2007).

In Brazil 30 percent of matriculants graduate to tertiary institutions, over 50 percent in Chile and over 90 percent in Korea - compared to just 15 percent in South Africa.

This is despite the report ranking South Africa fourth for the percentage of GDP it spends on education (in 2007 this was over four percent) behind Canada, Mexico and Australia.

The report ranks South Africa 11th out of 14 countries when it comes to the country's use of technology and innovation - putting the African country behind Korea as well as the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) countries, but ahead of Colombia, Mexico and Argentina.

According to the report it has the seventh most mobile telephones per 100 inhabitants, ahead of Chile, Brazil, Canada, China, India, but behind Argentina, Russia and Poland.
 

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No doubt, Brazil is highly taxed, so bureaucratic, highest interest rates in the world along with inferior infrastructure South Africa does have a competitive edge. But then you have to ask yourself why Brazil has 6% unemployment, has created 2 million jobs this year alone while South Africa has over 20% unemployment and has had meagre growth for some 3-4 years compared to Brazil who will growth 8% this year? Incompetent governance?

It's actually almost a miracle Brazil is doing so well given the structural hurdles that impede growth and investment.
 

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No doubt, Brazil is highly taxed, so bureaucratic, highest interest rates in the world along with inferior infrastructure South Africa does have a competitive edge. But then you have to ask yourself why Brazil has 6% unemployment, has created 2 million jobs this year alone while South Africa has over 20% unemployment and has had meagre growth for some 3-4 years compared to Brazil who will growth 8% this year? Incompetent governance?

It's actually almost a miracle Brazil is doing so well given the structural hurdles that impede growth and investment.
As oppose to the competent apartheid government?:lol:
 

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As oppose to the competent apartheid government?:lol:
No, but the apartheid government at least in it's final decade was ruled a pariah by much of the world, it also shut off over 80% of it's population. That just spells disaster for any country. South Africa today doesn't have an international embargo nor an economic system that legally shuts 80% of the population from economic prosperity and after 16 years of ANC rule you have 25% unemployment? Increased income inequality?

Sorry, but this government is very incompetent, but South Africans have themselves to blame just as much as the politicians. By blindly voting for one party and giving them super majority those in power have become complacent. That's why for any democracy it's healthy to have a switch of party control at least every 8 years. So voter stupidity also plays a role.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No, but the apartheid government at least in it's final decade was ruled a pariah by much of the world, it also shut off over 80% of it's population. That just spells disaster for any country. South Africa today doesn't have an international embargo nor an economic system that legally shuts 80% of the population from economic prosperity and after 16 years of ANC rule you have 25% unemployment? Increased income inequality?

Sorry, but this government is very incompetent, but South Africans have themselves to blame just as much as the politicians. By blindly voting for one party and giving them super majority those in power have become complacent. That's why for any democracy it's healthy to have a switch of party control at least every 8 years. So voter stupidity also plays a role.
ANC must go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
+1

We need DA
Not necessarily, what I would love to see is the ANC break up- and I mean a proper break up, not like COPE. The DA arent going to have power for a LONG time in reality but Im fed up with the ANC and their militant unions. When the apartheid govt eventually fell people thought SA was going to boom, but it didnt happen unfortunately. If SA isnt careful I can see it getting surpassed by several other African nations, in different fields, over the next 20-30 years.
 

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Not necessarily, what I would love to see is the ANC break up- and I mean a proper break up, not like COPE. The DA arent going to have power for a LONG time in reality but Im fed up with the ANC and their militant unions. When the apartheid govt eventually fell people thought SA was going to boom, but it didnt happen unfortunately. If SA isnt careful I can see it getting surpassed by several other African nations, in different fields, over the next 20-30 years.
ITA
 

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DA seems to be the most competent party, but I doubt they'll win the elections, even with their gains in 2009, they only garnered 2% of the black vote. Best way for the ANC to lose power is for a break up, but COPE has been a failure in providing an alternative to the ANC.

South Africa's opposition Dec 9th 2010 | JOHANNESBURG | from PRINT EDITION


FOR the first time since taking power 16 years ago, the African National Congress (ANC) is feeling rattled. Not that it worries about losing control of the national government. But the pesky little Democratic Alliance (DA) is yapping at its heels in the run-up to local polls due next year. The DA was formed ten years ago in an improbable merger of Helen Suzman’s anti-apartheid Democratic Party (DP) with the former ruling National Party, which had been renamed the New National Party.

The centre-right DA is the only party that has gained ground in every general election since apartheid ended. The DP, its predecessor, won just 1.7% of the vote and seven parliamentary seats in 1994. Last year the DA got nearly 17%, up from 12% in 2004, giving it 67 seats in the 400-seat parliament and confirming it as the country’s official opposition. Its closest rival, with just 7% of the vote and 30 seats, was the new Congress of the People (COPE), an ANC breakaway that had been expected to do better. But the mainstream ANC romped home just short of a two-thirds majority, leaving competitors to wonder if the ruling party could ever be ousted.

With dogged patience, Helen Zille, the DA’s leader (pictured above), hopes to defeat the ANC “ward by ward, city by city”, setting an example of integrity, good governance and efficient services. Her party started with Cape Town, wresting it from the ANC in 2006 and installing Ms Zille, a former journalist and anti-apartheid activist, as mayor. Last year the DA took control of the Western Cape, its first provincial conquest. Since then, it has been steadily clocking up local by-election successes across the country and is confident of further gains in next year’s municipal elections.

Widely regarded (and derided) as a “white” party, the DA has been striving to expand its support beyond the 9% of the population that is white—with some success. Its victory in the Western Cape was largely due to a surge in votes from coloureds (people of mixed race), who make up around 60% of the province’s population. With some minor privileges under apartheid, many coloureds voted for the National Party in 1994 for fear of being swamped by a hegemonic black majority.

About a third of the DA’s MPs are non-white. But the party still struggles to attract the black vote, three-quarters of the total electorate. Despite increasing criticism of the ANC government’s failings, most black people refuse to break their bond with the former liberation party. Barely 2% of black people voted for the DA last year.

Ms Zille says she is ready to make way for a good black leader. But there is no evidence he or she would attract more votes. The blonde, hard-working, Xhosa-speaking Ms Zille is popular across all groups in the Western Cape. Her courage in standing up to black paternalistic authority is particularly admired among black women. Under increasingly virulent and sexist attacks from ANC members—she has been accused of being a “racist”, a “wild *****” and a “cockroach”—she gives as good as she gets.
http://www.economist.com/node/17681047
 

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Not necessarily, what I would love to see is the ANC break up- and I mean a proper break up, not like COPE. The DA arent going to have power for a LONG time in reality but Im fed up with the ANC and their militant unions. When the apartheid govt eventually fell people thought SA was going to boom, but it didnt happen unfortunately. If SA isnt careful I can see it getting surpassed by several other African nations, in different fields, over the next 20-30 years.[/QUOTE]

Like which ones? South Africa so far is the only African country who is spending billions in research and development( only African country that has nano tech), on education and while that's no where nearly enough, I don't see any other African country spending money on research and development. Maybe countries like Ghana and Kenya could give them a run for their money. Angola is doing a lot of rebuilding but still nothing in research and development. I personally don't know much, but all evidence points out that nobody on the african continent will be able to catch up with the South Africans. If you look at countries building power stations and producing power south africa is by far the largest.south africa produces 45% of all power produced on the entire continent of Africa. And they are about to add another 10000 megawat by 2015.

Eskom, established in 1923, generates 95 percent of South Africa's electricity and 45 percent of Africa's electricity.

* In January 2008, the utility said it was unable to supply power to the country's mines sparking a major energy crisis.

* Eskom plans to invest 343 billion rand ($34.03 billion) in new power plants over five years. It plans to spend 1.3 trillion rand by 2025 to double generating capacity to 80,000 MW
.
1.3 trillion rand is about 190 Billion US dollars based on todays exchange.
Do you know any country planning on building 80000 MW capacity by 2025?
Link to the source below:http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKLN9543720090123
 

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DA seems to be the most competent party, but I doubt they'll win the elections, even with their gains in 2009, they only garnered 2% of the black vote. Best way for the ANC to lose power is for a break up, but COPE has been a failure in providing an alternative to the ANC.

South Africa's opposition Dec 9th 2010 | JOHANNESBURG | from PRINT EDITION


FOR the first time since taking power 16 years ago, the African National Congress (ANC) is feeling rattled. Not that it worries about losing control of the national government. But the pesky little Democratic Alliance (DA) is yapping at its heels in the run-up to local polls due next year. The DA was formed ten years ago in an improbable merger of Helen Suzman’s anti-apartheid Democratic Party (DP) with the former ruling National Party, which had been renamed the New National Party.

The centre-right DA is the only party that has gained ground in every general election since apartheid ended. The DP, its predecessor, won just 1.7% of the vote and seven parliamentary seats in 1994. Last year the DA got nearly 17%, up from 12% in 2004, giving it 67 seats in the 400-seat parliament and confirming it as the country’s official opposition. Its closest rival, with just 7% of the vote and 30 seats, was the new Congress of the People (COPE), an ANC breakaway that had been expected to do better. But the mainstream ANC romped home just short of a two-thirds majority, leaving competitors to wonder if the ruling party could ever be ousted.

With dogged patience, Helen Zille, the DA’s leader (pictured above), hopes to defeat the ANC “ward by ward, city by city”, setting an example of integrity, good governance and efficient services. Her party started with Cape Town, wresting it from the ANC in 2006 and installing Ms Zille, a former journalist and anti-apartheid activist, as mayor. Last year the DA took control of the Western Cape, its first provincial conquest. Since then, it has been steadily clocking up local by-election successes across the country and is confident of further gains in next year’s municipal elections.

Widely regarded (and derided) as a “white” party, the DA has been striving to expand its support beyond the 9% of the population that is white—with some success. Its victory in the Western Cape was largely due to a surge in votes from coloureds (people of mixed race), who make up around 60% of the province’s population. With some minor privileges under apartheid, many coloureds voted for the National Party in 1994 for fear of being swamped by a hegemonic black majority.

About a third of the DA’s MPs are non-white. But the party still struggles to attract the black vote, three-quarters of the total electorate. Despite increasing criticism of the ANC government’s failings, most black people refuse to break their bond with the former liberation party. Barely 2% of black people voted for the DA last year.

Ms Zille says she is ready to make way for a good black leader. But there is no evidence he or she would attract more votes. The blonde, hard-working, Xhosa-speaking Ms Zille is popular across all groups in the Western Cape. Her courage in standing up to black paternalistic authority is particularly admired among black women. Under increasingly virulent and sexist attacks from ANC members—she has been accused of being a “racist”, a “wild *****” and a “cockroach”—she gives as good as she gets.
http://www.economist.com/node/17681047
What is so competent about them? Anybody can be competent when their governing a wealthy population. If the DA wants to proof competency they can move to one of the poorest provinces or states and turn it in to a wealthy state with full employment. That would shut me up right a way. Other then that I'll keep questioning their sincerity and motive. Oh by the way those colored, I'm not impressed with them.
 

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What is so competent about them? Anybody can be competent when their governing a wealthy population. If the DA wants to proof competency they can move to one of the poorest provinces or states and turn it in to a wealthy state with full employment. That would shut me up right a way. Other then that I'll keep questioning their sincerity and motive. Oh by the way those colored, I'm not impressed with them.
Errr... They only recently took over control of the Western Cape and they've managed it considerable better than the ANC did, which is why their only going to consolidate their power in the next elections. What exactly do you question about their "sincerity and motive"? Their politicians who want power, just like the ANC, only difference is they seem more effective in positions of power and have less corruption allegations against them compared to the ruling government. Why aren't you impressed by "those colored"? Clearly they've enjoyed the leadership of the DA over other parties. Why aren't you unimpressed with South Africa's blacks who blindly vote for a party simply based on the past?

People need to stop voting purely along racial lines and focus on the issues. The ANC has become complacent because their guaranteed the vast majority of votes, no incentive to actually get to work.
 

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Errr... They only recently took over control of the Western Cape and they've managed it considerable better than the ANC did, which is why their only going to consolidate their power in the next elections. What exactly do you question about their "sincerity and motive"? Their politicians who want power, just like the ANC, only difference is they seem more effective in positions of power and have less corruption allegations against them compared to the ruling government. Why aren't you impressed by "those colored"? Clearly they've enjoyed the leadership of the DA over other parties. Why aren't you unimpressed with South Africa's blacks who blindly vote for a party simply based on the past?
You appear to be so blinded by hate and bigotry that you don't even notice you're contradicting yourself.

Kojo Laing, a Ghanaian poet and writer traveled to Capetown, South Africa.
He blogged:
"The truth about Capetown lies just beneath the surface, as it were: the more contrast you see between the small shanty rooms to buildings of the townships and then the solid post-victorian near arrogance of the middle-class suburbs the more tears you shed as you move around the city."
Link to the source:http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/africa/12/15/african.pilgrimages/index.html

The DA could start by turning those shanty towns (rooms) in to middle-class suburbs too, couldn't they. Let us see some good government. I think the majority of the South African population is a lot smarter then you would like to give them credit for.
 

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The ANC is divided between radical communists in the form of trade unions and people like Malema and corporatist stooges who only want to enrich themselves as well as a few of their cronies. Mbeki fits the latter group.
It appears that you are a very bitter person. Your goal appears to be to demonize the South African government and you have in so many words/ways insulted the black population of South Africa. After all the humiliation and tortured that they have suffered. Do you not have any shame? Do you not have any desency in you?
 

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The DA could start by turning those shanty towns (rooms) in to middle-class suburbs too, couldn't they. Let us see some good government. I think the majority of the South African population is a lot smarter then you would like to give them credit for.
You earn to be a middle class status. Not handed to you.

But , One thing that shocks me all together is the sorts of slums that still exists in this country.

How hard is it to make those people in Slums build decent , small housings ? Paid by the Feds and Province governments, but make the people build them. where everyone has water, electricity and decent sanitation. 16 years later. Not like they don't have the money to do that. But lack of political will.

SS Africa is the same on certain mentalities.
 
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