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Port of Cape Town



Port of Cape Town, Table Bay, the Fairest Cape, the Cape of Storms, the Cape of Good Hope, the Mother City. All these names provide an idea of what to expect. Cape Town competes with Alexandria for recognition as the most famous port in Africa and is certainly one of the most beautiful harbours in the world with its magnificent backdrop of Table Mountain framed by the mountainous Peninsular.


The port is situated on one of the world's busiest trade routes and will always retain strategic and economic importance for that reason alone.

Cape Town is also a busy container port, second in South Africa only to Durban, and handles the largest amount of fresh fruit.

Fishing has a significant place in the economic activity of the port, affecting the ship repair industry in particular, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a transhipment logistics and repair base for much of the year. The emerging oil industry in West Africa has also become a significant factor for the port's repair and maintenance facilities.

Passenger cruise ships

'The Fairest Cape' is a key destination for cruise ships, particularly those engaged in round the world cruising, and provides excellent direct airline connections to most parts of the world. Many of the smaller and medium size passenger ships make use of the world famous V&A Waterfront with its added tourist attraction and ambience while larger ships go into the main harbour. The port remains open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, but can be subject to strong winds that interfere with cargo and ship handling. An increasing number of oil supply vessels and rigs use Cape Town for repairs and refurbishment and the ship repair industry is vibrant and healthy.

The port is situated in Table Bay at Longitude 18º 26' E and Latitude 33º 54' S and lies 120 n.miles northwest of Cape Agulhas (the most southerly point in Africa).

Cape Town was established by the Dutch on 6 April 1652 when Jan van Riebeeck was sent to Table Bay to establish a victualing station for ships of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) as they sailed to and from the Dutch East Indies. The port progressed steadily over the centuries and consists today of two 'docks' - the larger outer Ben Schoeman Dock in which lies the container terminal, and the older inner Duncan Dock containing the multi purpose and fruit terminals as well as a dry dock, repair quay and tanker basin. Cape Town also boasts an extensive yachting marina.

Victoria and Alfred Basins

The historic Victoria and Alfred Basins - the original Cape Town harbour - now house the world famous Cape Town Waterfront but remain in use for commercial purposes, creating a unique attraction for the waterfront development. These are used by smaller commercial vessels including fishing and pleasure boats and by smaller passenger cruise ships.
Port Limitations:

The port of Cape Town remains open 24 hours a day 7 days a week. The depth at the entrance channel is -15.9m Chart datum, is -15.4m at the 180m wide entrance into Duncan Dock and -14m at the entrance to Ben Schoeman Dock. The depth in the Duncan Dock varies between -9.9m near the repair quay to -12.4m at the tanker basin. Ben Schoeman Dock varies from -9m to -13.9m.

Pilotage is compulsory for all vessels with the pilot being taken on board 1.6 miles and 155º off the main breakwater. Pilot transfer is by pilot boat but there are plans to introduce a helicopter transfer service at Cape Town. Navigation is subject to VTS (vessel tracking system) and tug service is provided by four tugs.The harbour and Table Bay are subject to strong winds during the Cape winter (April to September) that can disrupt cargo and ship working in the port.

Marine Craft:

Cape Town operates a fleet of Voith Schneider tugs. They include 1980-built 43-t bollard pull and 2001-built 50-t bollard pull tractor tugs. Each tug is maintained to SAMSA class 8 standard and is equipped for fire fighting and salvage. Cape Town tugs are seconded to Saldanha Bay when required at that port.

The port also employs a workboat named Petrel, two twin-screw pilot boats named Gannet (ex RG Kinnell) and Blue Jay, four launches named Troupant, Koester, Kite and Weaver, a pollution boat named Pelican plus a heavylift floating crane Inkunzi.

Port Volumes:

During the recent 2005/06 financial year Cape Town handled 3,400 vessels for a gross tonnage of 48,778,963-gt. Total cargo handled at the port (excluding containers) was 3,718,005 tonnes, of which 3,088,075 tonnes was bulk cargo, and 629,930t breakbulk. As with the other ports these figures do not include container tonnage, which can roughly estimated as being 9.948 million tonnes for 2005/06 (calculated on the basis of previous years), giving the port a total tonnage handled of 13,666,735 tonnes.

Excluding containers, total imports were 2,444,725t and exports 1,054,742t, with transhipments of 218,538 tonnes.

Cape Town's Container Terminal handled a total of 736,943 TEUs during the fiscal year 2005/06, of which 359,867 TEUs were imports and 377,076 exports. Tranships constituted 67,128 and 69,028 TEUs of those amounts respectively.

Port Facilities:

Cape Town, as the 'Tavern of the Seas' caters for general cargo on a common user basis, and is handling an increasing number of containers and in addition has become an important repair facility, especially for the west coast oil and diamond mining industries.

There are 34 berths in total including layby berths.

The port boasts extensive ship repair facilities. The main dry dock, known as Sturrock Dry Dock has an overall docking capability of 369.6m length and is 45.1m width at the entrance top with a depth of 14m. The dock may be divided into two sections of varying lengths.

The Robinson Dry Dock in the Victoria Basin measures 161.2m in length with an entrance top of 20.7m and a depth of 7.9m.

The port also has a synchrolift capable of handling ships up to 61m in length, 15m beam and 1,806 tonnes, as well as a repair quay situated in the Duncan Dock.

The adjacent Victoria and Alfred Basins have a variety of berths available for ship and boat repair as well as berthing of smaller vessels, including facilities for passenger cruise ships. Cape Town has two main terminals, or business units for cargo handling purposes.

The Container Terminal contains five deep-sea berths (of which four are in normal use for container ships) and two coastal container berths. They are served by six 40-t gantry cranes and will shortly take delivery of post-panamax gantry cranes for the larger container ships now in service. The Multi Purpose Terminal in Duncan Dock handles fruit, steel, paper, maize, wheat, rice, timber, coal, scrap and other general cargo, as well as passenger cruise ships.

The grain elevator has storage for 28,000 cubic metres. Duncan Dock also has a dedicated cold store for fish products with docking space for up to six vessels and the ability to discharge three simultaneously.

The port has good rail and road connections inland to other centres.

Cape Town has a number of bunkering points within the port supplying marine fuel oil, gas oil and blends and the port is serviced by bunker barges provided and operated by KZN Bunkers (formerly FFS Bunkers). During 2000 more than one million tonnes of bunker fuel was supplied to ships in Cape Town. A full range of ship chandling and stevedoring is available. The port, which is situated close to the central business district, houses a yacht club and marina as well as a NSRI base.

- Extracted from http://ports.co.za/cape-town.php
- More info: http://www.transnetnationalportsauthority.net/NPA_ports_cape_town_overview.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_of_Cape_Town
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
16th Jan 2008- All systems go for Cape Town's R4.2 billion port upgrade

Transnet Port Terminals - formerly South African Port Operations - commenced its R4.2 billion construction programme this week at the Port of Cape Town as part of a five-year plan to increase capacity at the country’s second largest container terminal. The port upgrade is an element of parent company Transnet Ltd’s R28 billion investment into port-related projects, from an overall R78 billion planned for investment over the next five years.

The expansion is expected to relieve mounting pressure at the country’s ports by enabling the terminal to improve from the current 740,000 TEUs per annum to 1,4 million TEUs by the end of 2012.

Oscar Borchards, Business Unit Executive at the Cape Town Container Terminal, said that the main contractors had arrived on-site on Monday, 14 January 2008 to commence work.

“Initial work will entail refurbishing the quay and deepening the berth and Ben Schoeman Basin to 15.5 metres,” he said, adding that this would be done in sections to mitigate a reduction in productivity at the terminal.

A consortium comprising Southern African construction firm WHBO and Cape Town-based Civil and Coastal would be responsible for deepening the berth, while Danish subcontractor, Rohde Nielsen, would complete the subsequent dredging work required at the harbour to allow for bigger vessels to pass through.

Borchards explained that other construction activities planned for 2008 include the building of a crane erection site to assist in the assembly of the first two new Liebherr ship-to-shore cranes and in the terminal’s conversion from straddle carriers to a rubber-tyred gantry (RTG) crane operation. Currently Pier One in Durban is the only South African terminal using the high-tech RTG cranes.

Before the end of the year, the terminal marshalling yard would also be converted to a staging area. In its entirety, the project includes the demolition of nonessential infrastructure and buildings, reconfiguration of the terminal to maximise stack capacity, a reefer-point expansion programme, as well as the procurement of new, specialised equipment including Liebherr ship-to-shore cranes and 32 RTGs. The quayline will also be extended by 10 metres to accommodate the new gantry cranes.

Borchards gave the assurance that productivity would be maintained during construction by diverting container vessels with their own ships’ gear to Cape Town’s Multipurpose Terminal. This would be supported by intense planning and engagement with all supply chain stakeholders.

Says Borchards, “We are confident that our current plan satisfies all requirements and will assist Transnet Port Terminals to promote efficiencies, reduce the cost of doing business and improve service delivery to customers, as dictated by Transnet’s four-point turnaround strategy.”
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
08 May 2008 : Cape Town Harbour Expansion on Track

Cape Town Container Terminal’s R4.2 billion expansion programme is moving full steam ahead since commencing mid-January 2008, despite early delays from the strong ‘Cape Doctor’ wind which hampered the terminal’s productivity earlier this year.

Transnet Port Terminals Business Unit Executive Oscar Borchards said subcontractors at the country’s second largest container terminal were working hard to meet the port operator’s forecast capacity improvement from 740,000 TEUs to 1,4 million TEUs by the end of 2012.

“We are currently blasting hard rock and initial earthworks are in progress. Danish subcontractor, Rohde Nielsen, has also completed soft dredging works at berth 601 as part of the move to enable larger vessels to pass through the harbour,” said Borchards.

The key aspects of the project are:

- Construction of a deeper terminal with new quay wall suitable for Super Post Panamax cranes

- Replacement of the old ship to shore cranes with Super Post Panamax cranes with twin lift capability

- Increasing stack capacity by moving from straddle carriers to a Rubber Tyred Gantry crane (RTG) operation

A crane erection site will be assembled at the terminal during 2008. This site will be used for the delivery and assembly of two new Liebherr ship-to-shore cranes scheduled to arrive in June 2008. A total of eight new ship-to-shore cranes will replace the current fleet of four Demag and two Noell cranes at the terminal, with half of the new Liebherr fleet expected to be in place by December 2008.

Before the end of 2008, the terminal marshalling yard would also be converted to a staging area.

The deepening of the first berth, 601, is expected to be completed in February 2009. It will swing into operation at its new depth of 15.5m and will be served by the first four Liebherr ship-to-shore cranes.

The remaining berths 602 to 604, together with the Ben Schoeman Basin, would also be deepened to 15.5m. These works will be carried out in sections throughout the five-year programme by a consortium comprising Southern African construction firm WHBO and locally based Civil and Coastal. This staggered approach would ensure that overall terminal productivity would be maintained during the construction programme.

“We are slowly but steadily transforming the container terminal into a modern four berth facility that is able to cater for larger new-generation vessels, which require more water and upgraded quay facilities,” said Borchards.

A major aspect of the expansion programme is the move from straddle carriers to an RTG operation. The cranes will be a huge first for the Western Cape, given that Pier 1 in Durban is the only other terminal to boast these world class cranes. The RTG contract is due to be awarded in June 2008 and the delivery of the first RTGs is expected to commence mid 2009.

By the end of the expansion programme in 2012 the Cape Town Container Terminal will boast no less than 32 RTGs with ergonomic features to enhance operators’ comfort and productivity, including an air-conditioned driver’s cabin at the top of the crane.

The cranes will span five containers and a roadway and are capable of stacking five high. They will be supplied with a Global Positioning System (GPS) which will update the operating system as each container is stacked in its specific location.

A team of trainers, already trained by Sri Lankan experts at Pier 1 in Durban, will be tasked with passing on their skills and knowledge to lifting equipment operators at the Cape Town Container Terminal. Once the first RTGs arrive next year, they will be used to offer further operator training within the terminal environment.

In its entirety, the Cape Town Container Terminal expansion project includes the demolition of nonessential infrastructure and buildings, reconfiguration of the terminal to maximise stack capacity, a reefer-point expansion programme and extension of the quayline by 10 metres to accommodate the new gantry cranes.

Borchards said Transnet Port Terminals was currently diverting container vessels with their own ships’ gear to Cape Town’s Multipurpose Terminal to maintain productivity. In addition two additional berths, berth 502 and 700, are being used to cater for vessels with their own ships’ gear.

The five-year construction programme is an element of parent company Transnet Ltd’s R28 billion investment into port-related projects, from an overall R78 billion planned for investment over the next five years to decrease mounting pressure on the country’s port system.

- http://www.cbn.co.za/dailynews/2411.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Busier times for Cape sea route
November 19 2008

South African ports will be able to cope with swelling numbers of ships rounding the Cape as they seek to steer clear of pirate-infested waters off the Somali coast and stand to benefit from increased business, the National Ports Authority has said.

But the authority did not expect a sudden deluge of ships and the situation would not cause the congestion last seen in the 1970s when the Suez Canal was shut because of conflict in the Middle East, said spokesperson Koen Birkenstock.

The risk to shipping from piracy off the Somali coast, with a drop in the price of bunker fuel after easing international crude oil prices, could increasingly entice ship owners to opt for the Cape sea route rather than Suez and the Gulf of Aden, Birkenstock said.

The danger of losing a ship, and its cargo, higher insurance costs and concerns over the safety of seafarers would weigh heavily on the higher-profile shipping companies and make it easier for them to choose the longer route around the Cape, he said.

That risk had to be measured against not only the cost of more fuel to cover the greater distance around the Cape, but also the cost of time in terms of days lost getting cargo between European and Asian destinations.

A prominent Norwegian shipping company, Odfjell SE, said it made the decision to divert its ships after pirates seized the Saudi Arabian supertanker MV Sirius Star, hundreds of kilometres off the coast of Kenya in the most brazen attack yet by Somali pirates.

At least three big shipping companies, the world's largest tug operator Svitzer and a large liquefied petroleum gas operator have said they are also avoiding the Suez.

But three of the Middle East's top oil exporting nations, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Kuwait, have no immediate plans to alter their crude oil shipping operations despite an increased threat from pirates off East Africa.

The Gulf of Aden, off Somalia, is linked to the Red Sea, which in turn is linked to the Mediterranean by the Suez Canal.

The route is thousands of kilometres and many days shorter than going around the southern tip of Africa.

"This will incur significant extra cost, but we expect our customers' support and contribution," Storeng said.

The ports authority's Birkenstock and salvage expert David Main, of Smit Marine South Africa, said the local industry was capable of dealing with an increase in shipping and had the capacity to provide services.

"I don't see a lot of extra cargo-discharging or loading happening here," Main said.

"Cargo facilities will not be the issue. If they stop here, it would be for the convenience of bunkering (refuelling).

The one thing that may be against us is the fact that, in Cape Town, ships have to berth to bunker. They cannot bunker at a pipeline in the bay."

Birkenstock said ships would be able to bunker from quayside points at four berths in Table Bay Harbour - two on the landing wall and two at the eastern mole.

Ships would also be able to get bunkers from the port's bunker barge if they were forced to dock at cargo docks.

"If there is an overrun here, ports such as Port Elizabeth, Durban and Richard's Bay can also provide services - such diversions would be dealt with by shipping agents," he said.

Main said "shipping companies have begun to pay crews double time if they are routed along the Somali coast".

He said an increase in shipping around the Cape coast would invariably also lead to a great demand for services and an increase in incidents out to sea could also not be discounted.

"It is true that the Cape sea route also has less friendly weather and sea conditions," he said.
 

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Its another string in our impressive bow. Most people don't think of Cape Town as a real 'port' city outside of yachting and pleasure craft type facilities, but it is a serious port as well.
 

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New Diamond sampler Vessel THE EXPLORER in Cape Town

Hello everyone!

A new Diamond Sampler vessel are suposed to install it's diamond sampling recovery plant etc in one of the drydocks in Cape Town, SA.

By new info I've read; The DP "The Explorer ", Diamond Sampler vessel should arrive to Cape Town in the next days (beginning of Mars)where it set to go in to one of the big drydocks here. Mayby Robinson? More likely into Sturrock Dry Dock (is't Sturrock that is seen in the midleft side of the overviewpicture in post #5 ?!).

Has anyone spotted the big ship arriving from Singapore yet? (it's about 110 m long), the vessel is painted in the same orange colour as The Diamond Mining Vessel "Peace of Africa", Namdebs latest, which were in Cape Town harber area in january.

http://www.afri-can.com/files/ssparagraph/f1990507720/singapore_267_1.jpg
http://www.afri-can.com/en/s.php?s=157149588

How many drydocks in Capetown (besides Robinson and Sturrock Dry Docks) have the capacity to take ships which is as large as 110 m long and 20 m wide?

Hope that anyone have some new detailed information that they can share (post here) and hopefully take some NEW nice pictures of the vessel, when it finally has arrived to Cape Town (and the Drydock).

Have a nice day.

Thank you all!

- A person from Sweden (with big expectations).

ARGO Srl or IMDH International Mining Dreding Holding is the owner of the new DP Diamond sampling Vessel. Nawakwa Diamonds and Afri-Can Marine Minerals will be the first to explore there EPL consessions with this new impressive Digital Positioning Diamond sampler vessel (of the Namibian coastline in 2009) when the new marine DP Diamond vessel is finished in Cape Town.
 

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ANYONE SPOTTED the new DIAMOND SAMPLER The Explorer yet ?!

PLEASE POST a NEW good picture if you're in Cape Town !!!

IT' Should 've arrived today monday the 9 th of mars.

M.V. :
The Explorer:
IMO-nr: 7904932
MMSI-nr: 376 639000
Callsign: J8B3625
 

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PLEASE POST A PHOTO IF YOU ARE IN CAPE TOWN !

http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/de...8.43164&centery=-33.9067&zoom=10&type_color=3

Current position monday 16th mars of the vessel is S Arm Rd, Cape Town.

THE EXPLORER is a new DP Diamond Sampler vessel which is suposed to install it's diamond sampling recovery plant etc in one of the drydocks in Cape Town, SA.


Has anyone filmed or taken any pictures of the big ship arriving from Singapore yet? (it's about 110 m long), the vessel is painted in about the same colour as The Diamond Mining Vessel "Peace in Africa", Namdebs latest, which were in Cape Town harbour area in january.

http://www.afri-can.com/files/ssparagraph/f1990507720/singapore_267_1.jpg
http://www.afri-can.com/en/s.php?s=157149588

How many drydocks in Capetown (besides Robinson and Sturrock Dry Docks) have the capacity to take ships which is as large as 110 m long and 20 m wide?

I hope that anyone have new detailed information that they can share (post here) and hopefully take some NEW nice pictures of the vessel, when it finally has arrived to Cape Town (and the Drydock).

Anyone who know if there is a public webcam overlooking the harbour or one the great dry docks?

Have a nice day.

Thank you all!

http://ports.co.za/shipmovements/capetown/article_2009_03_15_0958.html
 

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The Explorer

Hello everyone!

The Diamond Sampler vessel has installed it's diamond sampling recovery plant etc in Cape Town, SA. Soon it will start sampling rich Diamond areas off shore the coast of Namibia.

The DP "The Explorer ", Diamond Sampler vessel:

ARGO Srl or IMDH International Mining Dreding Holding is the owner of the new DP Diamond sampling Vessel. Afri-Can Marine Minerals will be the first to explore there EPL consessions with this new impressive retrofitted Digital Positioning Diamond sampler vessel (of the Namibian coastline in the next weeks or months / this summer) when the new marine DP Diamond vessel is finished in Cape Town.

New pictures and more info at http://www.afri-can.com/en/s.php?s=401650321
 
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