SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,842 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·



NEW York Stock Exchange-listed General Electric (GE) and SA’s Transnet Rail Engineering (TRE) said yesterday their joint venture to manufacture locomotives in SA was ahead of schedule.

The joint venture would see the two companies making a locomotive on South African soil for the first time. GE first delivered a locomotive made in the US to SA soon after opening an African office in 1898.

GE won a tender to supply 100 heavy-haul diesel locomotives to TRE. Earlier this year, the contract was extended for a further 43 locomotives, as Transnet expanded its rail capabilities. This followed years of criticism from the mining industry, frustrated by the low levels of capacity on coal and iron-ore export lines at a time when commodity prices were soaring.


As part of the tender, GE volunteered to include a local content programme, similar to those it had used in other countries, and set a self-imposed target of about 30% for local content, the company said.


The Mineworkers Investment Company was GE’s empowerment partner for the venture.

Transnet was expected to issue a tender for 1300 additional locomotives, 700 of which would be diesel. GE was interested in this potential tender. French company Alstom had also expressed an interest.


In terms of the deal, 133 locomotives were intended to be built locally and only 10 in Erie and Grove City, Pennsylvania. The latter 10 have been built.


So far 54 locomotives have been delivered. They were built by South Africans working for Transnet who were trained by GE staff, TRE’s CE, Richard Vallihu, said. "The key point is that it is difficult to build and manage trains on SA’s uneven terrain. As such, we have trained our staff with the help of the world’s best engineers. Still, this project is a local project which will benefit SA," he said.
The GE Model C30ACi locomotives were the first South African locomotives to meet UIC2 emissions standards.
They would be used to haul freight and coal.

Their advanced technology decreases life-cycle costs, improves fuel efficiency and reduces emissions. The global president and CEO of GE Transportation, Lorenzo Simonelli said the company was committed to building freight trains to service Africa but would have to involve a relatively large portion of local content.

GE said it had surpassed its self-imposed target of 30% local content as the locomotives assembled in SA had 37% local content.
"We are in this for the long haul. We have to be local if we want to do business in SA for years and beyond," Mr Simonelli said.


GE said the 42nd locomotive was a milestone of the order.

"The delivery of this locomotive is a big milestone for GE and the Mineworkers Investment Company as we are celebrating the first South African product delivered by our joint venture company GE South Africa Technologies.

"These locomotives represent great opportunities for Transnet and SA as well as GE.

"Transnet will be able to significantly improve hauling capability while reducing fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions," Mr Simonelli said.

Two GE locomotives would do the work of three older locomotives and save 600000l of fuel a year.

They would also reduce emissions by 1500 tons of carbon dioxide per year, equivalent to eliminating the emissions from 310 cars on SA’s roads.

I think it's crucial that as African countries we start putting conditionalities (reasonable of course) that would force multinationals that do infrastructure work on the continent to progressively do skills and tech transfer, with the long term goal of being self suffienct in strategic industries such as railroads, power generation. Africa has a dearth of infrastructure and the level of spending that is going to take place over the next 2 decades is going to stupendous, it will be a pity if we let Chinese, US, EU dominate these sectors. We definitely need them for the tech but they also need us for the growth so lets make sweeten their deals....
http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/Content.aspx?id=175138

Here are the trains by the end of this decade I'm sure SA will be an OEM in the train and locomotive sectors....



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,842 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·

Brian Molefe

South African State-owned logistics group Transnet’s aim was to become an original-equipment manufacturer (OEM) of locomotives within the next three to four years, CEO Brian Molefe said Thursday.

“We want to build our own locomotives and trains,” he told a business briefing in Johannesburg, adding that while there were challenges ahead, he was confident that with the support of government and other stakeholders, this goal could be achieved.

OEM status spin-offs would go hand in hand with localisation and, therefore, local skills development and job creation, Molefe indicated.

In addition to its initial order of 100 locomotives from General Electric’s (GE's) local arm GE South Africa Technologies, Transnet, at the beginning of this year, agreed to purchase an additional 43 units.

“As part of our agreement we are committed, along with GE, to stringent localisation, industrialisation, skills development and job creation,” Molefe pointed out.

According to the contract, ten of the locomotives were manufactured in the US and 133 were to be assembled locally at Transnet Rail Engineering’s Koedoespoort manufacturing plant outside Pretoria, with locomotive kits provided by US-based GE Transportation in the states.

More than 54 locomotives were already in service, generating significant operational efficiencies for Transnet Freight Rail (TFR).

“This project has significant local content. The only components that come from the US are the traction motors and engines, but we are investing in research to develop our own traction motors and engines,” he told Engineering News Online.

He added that Transnet was increasingly procuring some parts locally.

Meanwhile, GE Transportation announced on Tuesday that, along with its joint venture company GE South Africa Technologies, the 42nd locomotive had been delivered.

The locomotive was the most advanced diesel-electric locomotive ever built in South Africa and overshot GE’s self-imposed target of 30% local content, achieving 37%, which was the target for the 133 locomotives to be assembled in South Africa.

GE Transportation said its first contract to supply 100 locomotives to TFR was now 50% complete.

“Transnet will be able to significantly improve hauling capability, while reducing fuel consumption and greenhouse-gas emissions,” GE Transportation global president and CEO Lorenzo Simonelli said.

Two of the new locomotives are said to be able to do the work of three older locomotives, saving 600 000 l of fuel a year and reducing emissions by 1 500 metric tons of carbon dioxide over the same period. This was equivalent to eliminating the emissions from 310 cars on South African roads.

The GE Model C30ACi is the first locomotive in the South African region to meet stringent UIC2 emissions standards and would be used to haul freight and coal, while offering decreased life-cycle costs.
...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,179 Posts
why diesel ??? it's dirthy and bad for the envirenement in the long run.
I mean I understund if south africa buys some diesel to some areas where it's not worth to electrify, but building a new industry using diesel is just not a good thing for south africa right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,143 Posts
why diesel ??? it's dirthy and bad for the envirenement in the long run.
I mean I understund if south africa buys some diesel to some areas where it's not worth to electrify, but building a new industry using diesel is just not a good thing for south africa right now.
Maybe because the current electricity generation is not "enough" to power electrified trains, if they have to continue distribution to househols and their various industries, some of which may not have IPPs? A South African forumer would be able to explain this.
 

·
Still Comin' Out Strong
Joined
·
16,190 Posts
:banana:

I agree with you wholeheartedly Nostra. It's good that SA is getting this started. I'm a fan of at East Asia's rail operators JR Group, CRH and KORail and the local locomotive manufacturers that they have, and hopefully someday there are African equivalents.
 

·
Still Comin' Out Strong
Joined
·
16,190 Posts
why diesel ??? it's dirthy and bad for the envirenement in the long run.
I mean I understund if south africa buys some diesel to some areas where it's not worth to electrify, but building a new industry using diesel is just not a good thing for south africa right now.
DMUs (Diesel Electric Multiple-Unit trains) have the advantage of each unit being able to move itself (due to having a diesel engine), and are independent of other units. DMU's can be joined or split to match passenger demand, and if one unit is faulty the others can continue running.

They also do not require any overhead electric lines or electrified tracks (which can save costs in construction, upkeep, etc.).

I may not be totally right as I'm not totally 100% sure, but this is an advantage compared to EMUs (which I know even less about).
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top