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Wow, I haven't seen a picture of the construction for a while in LAX. The new terminal is looking amazing! Might snap a few pics in late august when I fly out to the east coast
 

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Once this terminal gets ready we will see lots of A380 traffic coming into LA maybe more than any other city beside London and Dubai. Air France, Korean Air, Singapore Airlines, China Southern, Qantas, And more will have flights to LA using the A380.
 

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Discussion Starter · #686 ·
Los Angeles Times said:
LAX operations pump $40 billion into Southern California economy
Los Angeles International Airport supported more than 294,000 jobs in 2011 and added about $2.5 billion in taxes to the city, county and state, a report says.
By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
August 20, 2012, 12:05 a.m.

Los Angeles International Airport helped pump $39.7 billion into the Southern California economy last year, and that number is expected to grow in the next few years as the airport expands, according to a new report.

The report by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. found that LAX's operations in 2011 supported more than 294,000 jobs and pumped billions of dollars from new construction and airport payrolls, nearby LAX-related businesses and tourist spending into Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

The operations added an estimated $2.5 billion in taxes to city, county and state coffers, according to the report for Los Angeles World Airports, the operator of LAX.

"This comprehensive report underscores the irrefutable importance of commercial aviation activity at LAX, and indeed throughout the Southern California region, on our economic well-being," Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said in a statement. "From passenger spending to the enhancement of national and international trade, LAX and our region's other airports are uniquely where the action is."

In 2011, 265,000 flights from all over the world landed at LAX, generating the employment and revenue streams for 25,540 people in all job sectors within the airport's property. The transportation and warehouse sector — including airline staff and freight handling — make up the bulk of the employment, with 16,809 workers. City, county and federal entities provide jobs for 4,225 people there.

With its ongoing renovation and construction, LAX had a monetary effect of nearly $2 billion in the Southern California region last year, with $850 million of capital improvement spending and $690 million in labor income, the report estimated.

"In total, these projects represent significant infrastructure improvements for the region," the report said.

The capital improvement projects by the Los Angeles World Airports could result in $590 million in tax revenue in Southern California, the study found.
Read More: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-...mostviewed+(L.A.+Times+-+Most+Viewed+Stories)
 

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First gate fit for Airbus A380


First gate fit for Airbus A380


Departure Lobby – Gate 134


Seating in the new terminal will have electrical and data plug-ins


Gate 134 Pier


Restroom exterior


Restroom interior


Escalator to Customs – Gate 134


Arrival Corridor – Gate 134


View of departure level from arrival corridor – Gate 134


Gate 134 Exterior


Gate 134 Ramp
 

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ROUTES: LAX gearing up to accommodate big jets and new routes

Dan Thisdell, London
1 Oct 2012, Flight Daily News

Visiting LA? You'll love the beaches and you won't want to miss Disneyland. While in town, walk with the stars in Hollywood and enjoy the great shopping. Travelling for business? By any measure, LA - that nexus of the world entertainment industry - is one of a dozen or so global mega-hubs, the great and growing centres of commerce and culture whose momentum is driving the 21st century.

In any case, LA by air is awe-inspiring. Whether arriving over the sea from the west or over a sea of lights by night from the east, one of the world's unforgettable travel experiences is the approach to the enigmatically named LAX (there's no significance to the X, which was added to LA when airport designations were standardised at three letters).

So, who doesn't want LA on their route network? Or, to put the question back to Los Angeles World Airports, the City of Los Angeles-owned airport operator, how hard can it be to sell LAX as a destination?

Surprisingly, the answer is "hard enough".

What any LAX passenger knows all too well is that on the ground, the LAX experience is challenging, often with chaotic check-in, very long queues at passport control, and overcrowded baggage claim and customs areas in too-small terminals that show their age.

For airlines, too few gates can mean complicated ground handling and secondary moves to remote parking when departure schedules don't call for a quick turnaround. More recently, there has been the matter of Airbus A380-compatible gates, as this West Coast gateway is an obvious destination for A380 traffic from Asia. Qantas opened LA's superjumbo era, and Singapore Airlines, Air France and Korean Air have followed, but they operate from just four gates: two attached to the main Tom Bradley International Terminal complex and two remote.

The root of all these problems, readily admitted by LAWA external affairs director and head of air services marketing Celine Cordero, is the fact that nothing of substance has been done to improve the facilities since the Bradley terminal opened in 1984. That development, inspired by the realisation that an airport upgraded piecemeal during the 1970s was not up to the task of welcoming the Olympic Games, was good, if not excellent, for its time. But times have changed and LAX - for reasons relating to budgets and local politics that would be familiar to an operator of any airport wedged into a dense urban area - has not.

However, the advent of so-called Group 6 aircraft such as the A380, Boeing 787-8 and biggest 777s has spurred action, resulting in what LAWA claims to be the biggest construction project in Los Angeles: a $4.1 billion modernisation scheme that will add 18 new gates - including nine dedicated to Group 6 aircraft - along the western edge of the existing Bradley terminal complex. The project is doubling concourse space and also involves improvements to the power and other systems as well as, critically, a widened taxiway running between the North and South runway pairs.

And, with 80 new customs counters and an automated baggage handling and inspection system, this "Bradley West" facility should cope with 4,000 passengers an hour.

The first of these new gates will have opened as delegates gather for World Routes, so Sonjia Murray, a consultant working with Cordero, is understandably excited about making an impact in Dubai. The remaining 18 Bradley West gates will open during 2013.

By its own reckoning, LAX is the sixth-busiest airport in the world and third in the USA, offering more than 600 daily flights to 91 domestic cities and more than 1,000 weekly nonstop flights to 56 cities in 32 countries on nearly 75 air carriers. But while it served more than 61 million passengers in 2011, it remains far from its peak of more than 67 million in 2000, and aircraft movements (604,000 in 2011) are also way down on that peak year (738,000).

The plan now, backed by Bradley West - and, possibly, future improvements to the North airfield runway layout, to better accommodate Group 6 aircraft movements - is to get LAX better connected. As Murray puts it, there are some notable gaps in the LAX system: India is "a big hole", as is Scandinavia; Eastern Europe is a gap; and remarkably, says Murray, South America is less well connected to LAX than it was a decade ago - Argentina is notably ill-served. She hopes Emirates will not have to wait much longer for company from its Gulf rivals. She would also like to link to Vietnam, and secondary Chinese cities are another sales target.

Industry consultant George Hamlin, a former TWA financial analyst and Airbus North America strategic planning director, reckons improved A380 capacity will be a "huge boost" for LAX. He stresses that what matters to airlines when it comes to "destination appeal" are seats and price - and getting more big aircraft into the airport means more passengers, which drives down prices and helps carriers bring in more people.

The new ground facilities at LAX, he adds, will probably enable the airport to cope with 15 or more extra flights daily to new destinations. The politically thorny issue of changing the runway layout is less important than fixing the on-ground passenger interface issues that have characterised the airport.

Aviation consultant and former British Airways executive John Strickland says a key test of the Bradley West development will be whether or not it improves airlines' operational reliability, for example by helping ensure that passengers get to the gates on time; pleasant passenger facilities count for little as far as airlines are concerned.

He also adds that for any airport the real key to selling itself as a destination is to make sure it knows its own market intimately. What businesses are visitors from which origins actually coming to meet with? To which destinations do local communities have family links? Which local leisure attractions appeal to passengers from a particular airline's home market?

In other words, says Strickland, an airport has to be able to show that, as a destination, it has the appeal to pull people onto an aircraft.

From that perspective, LAX is selling Los Angeles, not LAX. Murray and Cordero say they recognise this, and work closely with LA tourist and business development officials.

Murray also recognises that selling LAX as a destination is a non-stop effort. There are rival gateways - San Francisco, for one - and modern aircraft coming from Asia have the range to overfly the West Coast. "We recognise that we have a strong prominence as LAX," she says. "But we don't take it for granted."


http://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...o-accommodate-big-jets-and-new-routes-376260/
 

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re: monorail suggestion for LAX

Could be a little precarious during a quake...
I assure you, monorail won't fall down in earthquakes. There are several in Japan that have lived through quakes, including the monster 9.0 of 2011. The Tokyo Monorail was operating that night, after track inspection.

Monorail would be perfect for LAX, but I would bet anything that the powers that be will select some sort of APM (automated people mover) that has unnecessarily large guideways (like SFO and DFW). Why? Because it will feed more contractors and suppliers for a longer period of time. That's ok, we can afford it... right? :eek:hno:
 

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LAX plans multi-sensory passenger experience



Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is currently undergoing a major transformation, the centrepiece of which is the new Bradley West Terminal. Dominic Nessi, Deputy Executive Director & Chief Information Officer, Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA), was scheduled to address the 1st Future Travel Experience Europe Conference at ACI Airport Exchange in Amsterdam last November. While he was unfortunately unable to participate, he did have an important story to tell about the unique passenger experience that is being created, as he explained to Future Travel Experience.

The multi-billion dollar redevelopment of LAX centres on the new Bradley West Terminal, which will see the creation of a world-class facility that will provide a truly innovative airport experience. The Bradley West Project, which is scheduled to be complete in July 2013, aims to give passengers a real flavour of Los Angeles. The idea is for the airport itself to reflect the destination that it serves.

As Nessi explained, to achieve this, new media is being embraced. “First, LAWA is developing a unique approach to the passenger experience by embracing the ‘LA Feel’ and incorporating that into the customer experience by making it an integral part of our media efforts. Second, we want to move the media experience from airport display screens to the mobile devices of the passenger and have them work in conjunction with one another.”




Creating a sense of place


The renovation of what is currently the Tom Bradley International Terminal will see the introduction of over 100 integrated media elements, making use of visual- and audio-based techniques.

An LAX Story Board will be included, with integrated, high definition screens highlighting LA’s status as a creative capital. Device-to-display interactivity will also be used so that passengers can use their smartphones and tablets to interact with the displays. Passengers will be able to view images and videos, as well as listen to ambient sounds and music tracks, by connecting their device with the digital signage.

“LA is a one of a kind place in the world; Hollywood, the ocean and beaches, the mountains, film industry, the many ethnicities that live here all embody the LA spirit and are known around the world,” Nessi said. “By bringing these images into the Tom Bradley International Terminal, the world gets to be part of the LA scene in a unique, memorable manner. This is being rolled out in July 2013 when the new terminal opens, so actual images are still a closely guarded secret. We want the world to come to LAX to experience this phenomenon.”

To ensure that passengers can make the best use of the innovative media on offer, Wi-Fi will be available throughout the terminal, enabling smartphone and tablet users to easily connect to and download the content. A geo-location-based design will also allow for other useful functions, potentially the likes of mobile-based wayfinding.

Upon its completion, the new Bradley West Terminal looks set to deliver exactly what many passengers have been calling for – a personalised and enjoyable experience in an airport that has a true sense of place. With this in mind, if airports are to be judged on understanding their passengers, LAX must surely be among the leaders.


http://www.futuretravelexperience.com/2013/01/lax-plans-multi-sensory-passenger-experience/
 

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Theme Building?? Why can't it be named Octopussy?
 

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Important steps in the right direction. Passed through Dallas today and the interiors look very similar to New Tom Bradley...in particular the seats near the gates look virtually identical in their form and arrangement. Main things missing now are peoplemover linking all terminals and metro extension to airport itself. Of course, upgrading the domestic terminals would be nice too...some of the latter are pretty decent, but others are not.

Nice pics of the Theme Building, as well. Hope to grab some grub there one of these days. I read that some ex-Disney imagineers worked on the refresh of the interior. I visited LA once as a child (on route to Disneyland) and one the few mental visuals I retain to this day from that trip was looking at the Theme Building.
 
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