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On the DJC site, the lead story is on the Space Needle installing glass viewing platforms that jut out from the main observation deck. What's everyone think of this? As long as it doesn't alter the profile, I think it's fairly cool. Can anyone link the whole article?
 

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I think it depends on how big it/they is/are. I'm not really sure what there is to see directly below anyway! Oh well. Something new.
 

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The rendering is on the free part of their website. It looks like it's more about seeing more than a 180 degree view, than about being able to look down.

I'd prefer if they made them round, with seamless glass. Though doing it that way would probably be expensive.

 

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That is badassery. I like it. With this and the ferris wheel, entertaining out of town guests is getting easier and easier.
 

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The Sears Tower has something similar.

I like the round idea -- it would be like a ball turret on an old bomber :p
 

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Yes, this is being done all over. Sears Tower has had it for awhile, John Hancock has something proposed, it seems like every mega-tower in Dubai has something similar. To be honest I feel like it's a little overdone and we should stick to our classic 360 degree view. The last thing we need is more lines up there.
 

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I tend to agree WSGuy. Looks like a fad. Fortunately it looks like the halo of shading devices above the restaurant windows and below the observation deck can mostly remain intact (at least the outer edge) so I don't think the profile will be messed up.

 

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http://www.djc.com/news/ae/12041565.html

Glass viewing platforms would expand views at Space Needle
By MARC STILES
Journal Staff Reporter

The Space Needle could get permission next week to add three glass viewing compartments to the “halo” near the top of the icon.

The small spaces would have see-through floors and extend off the needle's observation deck at the 520-foot level. Space Needle CEO Ron Sevart said they would be evenly spaced around the platform. Each would have three walls, a glass floor “and really nothing else,” he said.

The goal is to “maintain [the needle's] relevance and improve the viewer's experience.”

The needle has gone through several changes since it was built 50 years ago. In 1982, the SkyLine was added at the 100-foot level for private events.

Space Needle officials provided renderings of the needle showing the glass compartments as seen from Kerry Park, and they show that this change would be less noticeable than the SkyLine.

The needle is a landmark so changing it requires approval from the Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board. The board, with the help of its architecture review committee, has been vetting the idea since last summer. Board members are expected to make a decision on the Space Needle's application Wednesday.

Space Needle officials also have been meeting with neighborhood and preservation groups, such as Historic Seattle and Docomomo WEWA, a local group that promotes the appreciation of modern architecture.

Euginia Woo, director of preservation services for Historic Seattle and a Docomomo board member, said the groups are not opposed to the additions. “They are trying to keep it compatible with the original design intent of the structure and also adding to it to continue making the needle more relevant in the future.”

Space Needle Corp. hired Halcrow Yolles to do the structural glass design and also is working with architects from Callison on the project.

Sevart said he hopes the project is done in time for the needle's 50th anniversary. He did not know how much the additions will cost.

Halcrow Yolles worked on the renovation of Chicago's Willis Tower, formerly Sears Tower. The building has a new skydeck observation area, nicknamed The Ledge, with a series of glass boxes that extend 4.3 feet from the exterior wall. The boxes are 1,353 feet above the street, and are made of three half-inch-thick glass panes. Each box can withstand wind pressures up to 125 pounds per square foot and loads of up to 5 tons, according to the company's website.

“Structural glass is at a place today that allows us to do this in a very safe way,” Sevart said.

About 1.5 million people visit the needle every year, and that number has been pretty consistent, according to Sevart. “We continue to reinvest to maintain attendance levels.”

It costs $19 to visit the top of the 605-foot needle. Sevart said that fee will include stepping into the glass compartments.

 

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Hot chick in the redering is hot.


The goal is to “maintain [the needle's] relevance and improve the viewer's experience.”

read: do it before the Columbia Tower gets the idea first.
 

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I assume they'll remove the slats directly below the glass box - if they don't it would defeat the whole point of the glass floor.
 

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They might be a protected architectural feature. But they're also ricketty...when I did the halo thing we weren't supposed to put weight on them.
 

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I am having mixed feeling about this. I think it is cool idea and it will be popular for sure. My main concern that it might ruin the way Space Needle look. I agree round one might do better. I think they should consider to move the glass viewing platforms or add a new floor with glass floor to just under the restaurant. It would be dramatic and thrill for both locals and tourists. There are some observation towers around the world have almost entire floor of glass to allow people to see what is under them.
 
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