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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello US,
Im from Belgium with a question to all of you, and I want to hear your opinion.

Im for an architecture project searching for the limit of the private - public border. Searching for new city ideas to optimize the way we use our space.

So the general idea is, more collective spaces, with more comfort and quality, and less private space. Viewing the city as an house. For more info about the whole idea please click here:

http://stevenspapen.carbonmade.com/projects/2877758

Another extra idea, where I want to focus on here, is the idea about sprawl. If we increase the city density.. what will happen with the intercity areas? What can we do with them... Use it for ecologic resources? Just let nature take over the current constructions there. I dont know, but I want to find out :D
So please your opinions.


Thanks in advance
 

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I'm in the minority here, but I don't care for "urban planning" or "sustainable development". I'll take my "private" space and use my property however I want to.
I don't like the idea of being confined and controlled by an elitist bureaucracy.
That's my opinion and how I feel.

Good luck with your project though.
 

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If the US population exceeds 600,000,000 by century's end, there will both be greater densification within core urban boundaries as well as greater densification along sprawl corridors and secondary urban nodes. Hope that helps.
 

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I'm in the minority here, but I don't care for "urban planning" or "sustainable development". I'll take my "private" space and use my property however I want to.
I don't like the idea of being confined and controlled by an elitist bureaucracy.
That's my opinion and how I feel.

Good luck with your project though.
Ironic thing is that it was the government(with "outside" help) who advocated suburban sprawl in the first place. For example, zoning laws in many places forbid anything but auto centric sprawl. Look it up if you don't believe me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, very interesting...
Didnt know about that Law...

Nice to see your vision and ideas about it...
Ofcourse that in the USA you still have more free space then in the country I know... Belgium.. but then again I think it's not bad to think about it... and the big traffic problems, ecologic problems and social problems sprawled space brings with it...
This in relationship with a new form of privacy and private space might open perspectives..
 

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I'll take my "private" space and use my property however I want to.
I think Houston has shown that a "lawless" landuse policy can work, then again...Houston isn't exactly the model city. I'm all for low density development (sprawl) in the exurbs and urban fringe, but in my opinion, cities should and must be DENSE (10k/sq mi+).
 

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Ironic thing is that it was the government(with "outside" help) who advocated suburban sprawl in the first place. For example, zoning laws in many places forbid anything but auto centric sprawl. Look it up if you don't believe me.
I'd like to further investigate this. I'm being lazy so could you please provide specifics or any other information? Somewhere I can at least start off from. Thanks

I think Houston has shown that a "lawless" landuse policy can work, then again...Houston isn't exactly the model city. I'm all for low density development (sprawl) in the exurbs and urban fringe, but in my opinion, cities should and must be DENSE (10k/sq mi+).
I agree that the inner core of cities should be dense for various reasons. But other than that, if the market demands it, then high density development will come. At this stage though it's been a lot of government backed initiatives and a process to lessen our so called "carbon footprint". And I don't want to trigger any Climate Change talks with that last sentence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
if the market demands it, then high density development will come.
Won't that be reacting when the problem is already there, coming a step too late?
We might better think forward? Act now

(Im not attacking you, it are open questions, Im here to know and understand your opinions :) )
 

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Lol, let the market decide when to do sustainable development... most people living in tract homes next to farmland at the very edge of a city really don't care what's beyond the immediate view from their house, until the edge of some neighbouring city starts closing in from the other side...

but no, let's wait for an ecological recession fist...
 

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The idea of sharing public space is nice and should be more widely accepted. What might seem foreign to you, though, is that our nation is founded on privacy and similar ideals. We broke from England because we wanted to do things our way, as we saw fit, and we didn't want some big governing body giving us orders. This ideal went down to the individual level, where we accept that the government shouldn't tell a man what he can do on his property. These principles of doing what you want with your own property to make your life how you want it, to wanting the government to stay out of the consensus of the people, is still found today. (This is all in contrast to European thinking, which has roots in the feudal system: people looked to lords and similar rulers for protection and were willing to give up more for that protection; that has now evolved into people wanted a little more from their modern government, and the people are willing to give up a little more.) It would be important to remember the history of each country/continent and how that history has shaped the ideology over time.
 

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I'd like to further investigate this. I'm being lazy so could you please provide specifics or any other information? Somewhere I can at least start off from. Thanks
There's not really too much to look up, from a zoning standpoint, modern zoning regulations separate residential use from commercial use and industrial use. Earlier in the development of cities these uses were often in one building, or at least in the same block.

There are also tax credits for homeownership on top of that with the recent housing downturn there are also tax incentives (at least in my state) for buying a new house. While there aren't specific regulations that encouraged sprawl, taxes go a long way in shaping our behaviors. Did the government specifically try to create sprawl, probably not, but the policies in place paved the way.

On top of that the interstate system went a LONG way to induce sprawl. They allowed us to move further away from the core. When the city traffic on the highways got too crowded loops were built around cities to bypass them, people moved toward the loops, and so on.

I also believe in free choice to live where u want, how you want, but you should pay for your lifestyle choices and how they affect others I think taxes are a great way to do this. For instance, why should someone who buys an older home within existing infrastructure pay the same in taxes as someone who moves farther out, making the city expand infrastructure? Everyone knows living in denser areas is more efficient for the city as a whole, this decision should be rewarded somehow. I don't claim to know the best way to allocate taxes to do this but I think it could be done, and would ease sprawl on top of letting the market work.
 

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Just off the top of my head, one way we could alter the tax code against sprawl is to base property taxes from not only property value but also square footage of the house and lot. This would entice people to build smaller homes on smaller lots... Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It would be important to remember the history of each country/continent and how that history has shaped the ideology over time.
Thanks for this short but clear information. This makes the research even more interesting... The contrast between two regions who are so often taken together as the 'western' countries... Interesting to see how such a different way of thinking brings a whole other result in this city-density-sprawl issue...

and on Card04: interesting possibilities, with those tax systems.. might be a first step in leading to a 'greater ideal'. Then again it would possibly make the gap between the rich and the poor even bigger... and might us give more social problems.. where a mix of all eco-class people might be a better goal..
 
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