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***Alexxx***
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5,275 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sprawling suburbs, without big roads...

Most UK cities are pretty dense, but unlike a lot of other European cities, once outside the city centre, the development drifts off into semi detached/detached suburbia...

...The difference is that unlike most countries suburbs there arn't huge tree lined parkways or multi laned expressway...just smaller roads but with the addition of main line rail services.

There are a few places which are just very car orientated, but even then, the roads are not very big...

Here are photos of the South Manchester suburban area. You can see all the houses, no apartments, no big roads, but instead quite a lot of rail which I guess takes the place of the big roads.

Bramhall



Hale



Hazel Grove



Heald Green



The main reason that I can see for the style of the development is that most of these places are old villages that have been expanded with Manchester, rather than new purpose built suburbia.

Discuss and show any other examples ;) xxx
 

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Journeyman
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16,814 Posts
Yes, England has a lot of that. But dramatically less than countries like the US in particular that have more/bigger highways, and with tighter lot size on average. These areas would have decent transit and pedestrian mode shares (decent by suburban standards), aided by decent walking connections, including trails through privately-owned fields.

A couple of those look like older towns. Also I bet a lot of the bigger houses are duplexes.
 

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Moderator
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Yes, England has a lot of that. But dramatically less than countries like the US in particular that have more/bigger highways, and with tighter lot size on average. These areas would have decent transit and pedestrian mode shares (decent by suburban standards), aided by decent walking connections, including trails through privately-owned fields.

A couple of those look like older towns. Also I bet a lot of the bigger houses are duplexes.
Depends really on where you are. I lived in a suburb built in the 1980's in Northampton and we had a bus every 20 minutes during the week, but the bus service stopped at 6pm. We did, however, have nice walkable and pedestrian friendly developments in the area though. The house I lived in here was a detached house (free standing). Shops were quite a long way away - you had to use the bus or a car to get to the closest supermarket. Here is a google map location for this area.

I also lived in a small village that was swallowed up by Northampton and we had a very good bus service with a bus generally every 10-20 minutes but again, after 6pm things became problematic. Here I lived in a very large 1930's semi-detached (you'd call it a duplex I guess). Shops were very close by and you could walk to a supermarket. Here is a google map location for this area.
 

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pooh bear
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7,592 Posts
Most Connecticut suburbs including mine don't have big roads. Suburban sprawl in New England is closer to the European model than in other parts of the US, it usually is existing towns expanded with suburban development, but of course lower density than in Europe.
 

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Moderator
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17,472 Posts
Yes, England has a lot of that. But dramatically less than countries like the US in particular that have more/bigger highways, and with tighter lot size on average. These areas would have decent transit and pedestrian mode shares (decent by suburban standards), aided by decent walking connections, including trails through privately-owned fields.

A couple of those look like older towns. Also I bet a lot of the bigger houses are duplexes.
Those who live in American suburbs more depend on automobiles than those in The UK.

Unless the suburbs are in the East Coast or Greater Chicago where there is a good commuter rail system.
 

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The Railroad Anomily
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158 Posts
You see lots of spots in Pennsylvania and western Maryland where there are a lot of town houses and houses but the roads are only two lanes wide. While in Virginia most built up areas at least have a four or six and sometimes a eight lane wide road that feeds them.
 
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