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Discussion Starter #1
With the new collective bargaining agreement in the NFL moving the season to 17 games in 2021, you will see a lot more international and neural site games with that extra game. We've seen the NFL host games in London at Wembley, Twickenham, and Tottenham Hotspur Stadium; Mexico City at Estadio Azteca; and the Bills did some games at Rogers Centre in Toronto, which were not a huge success based on attendance and stadium orientation, and the Packers did a preseason game in Winnipeg, which the stadium field wasn't ready for.

I think you'll see the NFL try to get into a lot of different markets all over the world and would think some of the first targets would be Brazil, Ireland, France, Germany, Spain, Australia, Japan, and more. We've seen college football games in Dublin and Sydney, and I think it makes sense for Tottenham Hotspur Stadium to get in on this white their American football stadium accommodations.

Let's discuss what stadiums could host an NFL game. The field would need to be at least 130 yards in length (100 yard field, 2 10 yard end zones, and at least a few yards of extra space beyond each end zone.) I think the NFL will probably look for stadiums with at least 60,000 capacity and luxury suites and hospitality areas. The bigger the stadium the more attractive, but now that a team won't have to give up a home game to play these games, that might be less important and some smaller stadiums might get selected.

Also, please post pictures of NFL and college football games in international stadiums.
 

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let‘s find out first if we‘re going to have a season at all ...

they said the only fair idea behind 17 games schedule is to have the same number of home games per conference per year. means one year AFC teams play 9 home games and NFC year after! I do not think 17 games schedule is going to impact international games too much, apart from having more regular season games means more “disposable“ games as well
 

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Veltins Arena. Could roll the grass field outside and lay down an artificial turf so the field wouldn't get marked/damaged for Schalke matches, has a retractable roof, and in a huge metropolitan region.
 

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Red Bull Arena in Leipzig gets my vote. Even though it's designed for a different sport, it's almost a perfect American Football stadium with regards to its sightlines and general design:





Watching a game from the 50 yd line would look perfect here!
 

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France: Stade De France
Germany: Berlin Olympiastadion/Allianz Arena/Red Bull Arena (Once it expand) / Signal Iduna Park (Will look awesome with the Yellow Wall Stand)
Spain: Wanda Metropolitano/Santiago Bernabeu/Camp Nou
Brazil: Maracana Stadium
Japan: Tokyo National Stadium
Australia: ANZ Stadium/MCG/Marvel Stadium
 

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German certainly has Stadiums that are favorable to American Football, with the front rows being raised above the field level.
Most other rectangular stadiums built for soccer or rugby would need tarps over the first few rows as they'd be obstructed from the pay by the players on the sidelines.

Though an American Football field may fit easily, I'd say no to any Baseball fields (Japan, Korea), Athletics tack stadiums (like Berlin Olympic) or Cricket/Aussie Rules Ovals (I'd include Sydney's ANZ in its current configuration and Melbourne's Marvel Stadium regardless of movable tiers). I'll also throw in Stade de France and Dublin's Croke Park as thefield is just too large. The viewing experience in these would be awful.
 

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German certainly has Stadiums that are favorable to American Football, with the front rows being raised above the field level.
Most other rectangular stadiums built for soccer or rugby would need tarps over the first few rows as they'd be obstructed from the pay by the players on the sidelines.

Though an American Football field may fit easily, I'd say no to any Baseball fields (Japan, Korea), Athletics tack stadiums (like Berlin Olympic) or Cricket/Aussie Rules Ovals (I'd include Sydney's ANZ in its current configuration and Melbourne's Marvel Stadium regardless of movable tiers). I'll also throw in Stade de France and Dublin's Croke Park as thefield is just too large. The viewing experience in these would be awful.
Stade de France might be good for Canadian football. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
While viewing experience and sight lines are cool, I wouldn't put too much stock into it. In America we do football games in old baseball stadiums and NASCAR tracks just for the novelty of it. Some college football stadium have some pretty bad seats, but football games are about the environment, and unless you are higher up and near the 50s, you are typically relying on the big screen to see some things. As far as height of the first row, I think it only needs to be slightly higher than what you see in most English stadiums. There are a lot of stadiums like M&T Bank Stadium, FedEX Field, and CenturyLink where the first row is not much higher.

If I were a betting man, I'd imagine the next three places NFL is targeting are Brazil, Germany, and Australia. Maracana Stadium and Allianz Arena look pretty turn key for NFL without any tarps. ANZ Stadium would work fine.

The NBA got itself in quite the PR disaster with its love of China, so I don't think the NFL will go down that road.
 

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If I were a betting man, I'd imagine the next three places NFL is targeting are Brazil, Germany, and Australia. Maracana Stadium and Allianz Arena look pretty turn key for NFL without any tarps. ANZ Stadium would work fine.
There is no chance that an NFL game takes place in a football stadium during the season. Clubs spend significant amounts of money to get impeccable pitches. The last thing they want is a game rendering all these efforts worthless.
For this reason the only available stadiums could be the Stade de France and the Schalke Arena. The first is a national stadium which is rarely used in the final four month of the year. And the former has as mentioned above a retractable pitch. This allows the stadium operator to save the pitch while hosting the NFL.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
An NFL game doesn't really put that much of a beating on grass unless it rains, which I know you can't predict, but can almost guarantee it in London. The Ravens turf at M&T Bank Stadium was in pretty impeccable condition during the first half of the season this year.
 

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I don't know why any stadium would bother unless the city they are located in has a large US expat community. I went to an NFL game, it took a long time to play, the action was limited, to much stop and start it's barely watchable live, for people used to watching football, rugby, rugby league or Aussie Rules its a non event live. It's a game made for TV and sitting outside the stadium tailgating and getting drunk.
 

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An NFL game doesn't really put that much of a beating on grass unless it rains, which I know you can't predict, but can almost guarantee it in London. The Ravens turf at M&T Bank Stadium was in pretty impeccable condition during the first half of the season this year.
the problem lies more with the paint job they need to do on the pitch.
 

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I don't know why any stadium would bother unless the city they are located in has a large US expat community. I went to an NFL game, it took a long time to play, the action was limited, to much stop and start it's barely watchable live, for people used to watching football, rugby, rugby league or Aussie Rules its a non event live. It's a game made for TV and sitting outside the stadium tailgating and getting drunk.
It's more about local support for the game. There aren't 80,000 ex-pats going to Wembley two or three times every year. Germany would almost certainly be able to draw support. Other countries, I'm not so sure. It's very hard to gauge how popular the sport is internationally.

I would imagine fans of the game, who probably watch games live on tv, are used to the stoppages.
 

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It's more about local support for the game. There aren't 80,000 ex-pats going to Wembley two or three times every year. Germany would almost certainly be able to draw support. Other countries, I'm not so sure. It's very hard to gauge how popular the sport is internationally.

I would imagine fans of the game, who probably watch games live on tv, are used to the stoppages.
There's about 200,000 Americans living in the UK, about 60,000 in London.

When you watch on TV the stoppages are when the ads are played, when you watch in a stadium nothing happens. It's probably why people get drunk at the games, there's nothing else to do.
 

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There's about 200,000 Americans living in the UK, about 60,000 in London.

When you watch on TV the stoppages are when the ads are played, when you watch in a stadium nothing happens. It's probably why people get drunk at the games, there's nothing else to do.
I've been to a few of these games. The stadiums are not full of Americans. There are some Americans there, but the overwhelming majority are people from the UK. The sport has a fair-sized fanbase here.

I've little drunkenness at games, and as I said, fans will be quite aware of the stoppages, the worst of which are actually later in the game. They usually organise some kind of distraction in the stadium for the longer ad breaks, and the shorter ones aren't that long.
 

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I've been to a few of these games. The stadiums are not full of Americans. There are some Americans there, but the overwhelming majority are people from the UK. The sport has a fair-sized fanbase here.

I've little drunkenness at games, and as I said, fans will be quite aware of the stoppages, the worst of which are actually later in the game. They usually organise some kind of distraction in the stadium for the longer ad breaks, and the shorter ones aren't that long.
yes, also many fans from continental europe came to those games. mostly people who do not get a chance to travel to the states that often. still, in long term that will ease a bit, Im not so sure about the future of these international games, not too bright imho. they should stick to the usa anyway.
 

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yes, also many fans from continental europe came to those games. mostly people who do not get a chance to travel to the states that often. still, in long term that will ease a bit, Im not so sure about the future of these international games, not too bright imho. they should stick to the usa anyway.
As long as they keep selling out, they'll probably keep having them. They've been doing them since 2007, with pre-season games before that, so the "novelty" isn't wearing off. They undoubtedly help promote the game in the UK, and maybe Europe too, which is probably why the NFL is so keen.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
When I attended an NFL game at Wembley (See my pictures here) the crowd was a mixed bag. I'd say there were 20,000-30,000 people that traveled from the US to see their team as its a fun trip and traveling for NFL is a pretty big thing as there are no restrictions on away fans in stadiums. The rest of the stadium was filled with fans from all over Europe. There were so many different languages being spoken around me. It seems NFL fans in Europe have picked a favorite team, and when that team comes to London, many make an effort to go. So between traveling American fans, traveling European fans, and people around London that just want to go to an NFL game, it's an easy event to fill. I think Germany, or Spain, or France, or Italy, or Ireland would have no problem filling a stadium for one game.
 
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