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I start this thread because I stumbled across this:
http://www.28dayslater.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=891
which has some great photo's of it.

What an amazing building.

What is going on with it?
As an outsider I don't know too much about its current usage - Is it actually used for anything?
What about the future - Does it have any serious future plans?

Does Peel own it?

What would people like to see happen with it?
 

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The problem with this building is the ceilings are too low and there was a plan to hollow it out and create apartments but nothing came of it.Peel don't own it as far as I know but they were in talks ages ago with the people who do about some kind of partnership as it's slap bang next to were Liverpool Waters is to be.It's a great shame this building is being left like this.
 

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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
 

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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
Wow, I like your style! Not sure if I agree or not, but that is radical thinking. I wonder if anyone could mock-up a picture of what it would look like?
 

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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
Quite possibly the worst shout I have ever heard on this site....and I include any of John MK's rants in the evaluation.

For me this is THE most impressive building on the Liverpool skyline and is in desperate need of immediate regeneration to a high standard.
 

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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
Boo! Thumbs down for this idea. We've already lost a gem of a building in the Bibby's building and to demolish this would be a travesty.
 

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Also, after regeneration, this lit up decently would be absolutely epic beyond belief on the waterfront from a Wirral perspective.
 

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Let the Jam decide
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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
OMG!!! did you sniff glue when you wrote that!!!
 

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I think that, just because it currently has no function, doesn't mean it never will. As such, it should be retained. Albert Dock looked like nothing other than a millstone around the city's neck for so long, only for the diamond to be given a good polish. The Tobacco warehouse is not so prominent that it present an immediate obstacle to development. On the contrary, is LW grows around it, it will become hot property before you know it.

Bank it for now. It's time will come.
 

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This evening there was a report on the One Show about the iconic Fort Dunlop old tire factory in Brum.



It was a building with similar issues as Stanley in that the floor heights weren't particularly big. They appear to have constructed a travel Lodge on the side of the building, perhaps to act as an anchor for the rest of the regeneration and the building is now mixed use with offices, shops, apartments, etc.

Can't see any reason why this model can't be used for Stanley.

 

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I know this will be an unpopular opinion, but I favour the demolition of this building. The tobacco warehouse was built by Lyster in 1901, on the infilled south side of Stanley Dock. It is Grade II listed. The building overshadows and diminishes the southern warehouse by Jesse Hartley, built in 1848, Grade II* and similar to the Albert Dock.

I have a vision of Stanley Dock with refurbished Hartley warehouses on either side of the dock and a superb open space alongside the water. At present the density of building and internal design blight the regeneration of the area.
I understand where you're coming from here but there's no comparison imo with the Albert Dock. The two Hartley warehouses have deteriorated badly,the north one in particular and the fact that this decay continues is an utter disgrace that should shame EH and anyone working in planning and conservation in Liverpool. Imo the Tobacco warehouse will be (should be) upgraded to Grade 11 * .
 

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Fort Dunlop does indeed have a lot in common... iconic, left to rot for a long time but just too damn impressive to tear down... after all, we're not Americans!



 

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Sad phase which Detroit is going through, basically downsizing the city because it has facilities that can accommodate 2million people but its population is now half that.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/mar/09/detroit-looks-at-downsizing-to-save-city/

http://detroit.blogs.time.com/2010/03/09/downsizing-detroit/

http://detroityes.com/industry/14studepan.htm

I think making the Stanley Dock warehouse a leisure/adventure destination would be good. Maybe different floors have different themes or facilities.

Maybe a paint ballling floor, roller skating/ skateboard floor, a Farmageddon type floor, go-karting, abseiling on the outside, a food market with small eateries like on the Naschmarket in Vienna and space for arts and exhibitions.

Whether any are viable or possible is another thing.
 

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Sad phase which Detroit is going through, basically downsizing the city because it has facilities that can accommodate 2million people but its population is now half that.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/mar/09/detroit-looks-at-downsizing-to-save-city/

http://detroit.blogs.time.com/2010/03/09/downsizing-detroit/

http://detroityes.com/industry/14studepan.htm

I think making the Stanley Dock warehouse a leisure/adventure destination would be good. Maybe different floors have different themes or facilities.

Maybe a paint ballling floor, roller skating/ skateboard floor, a Farmageddon type floor, go-karting, abseiling on the outside, a food market with small eateries like on the Naschmarket in Vienna and space for arts and exhibitions.

Whether any are viable or possible is another thing.
I said some time ago that it would be perfect as the centrepeice of a fan park for a stadium at Clarence Dock.

You could have luxury Albert Dock style apartments on the top levels and then house the club's offices and an admin block in the levels below that.

On the ground, 1st and second floors you could house the ticketing office, museum, club shops, corporate hospitality (the heritage being a huge selling point on this front), cafes and bars.

Housing much of this within Stanley Dock Tobbacco Warehouse, would allow a compact stadium design to fit more sympathetically on the dock, since the stadium would not have to house all of those fascilities.

This has happened a lot with downtown stadiums in the states. The kind of thing Tom W Henry might be interested in for LFC or might suit cash strapped Everton FC.
 

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^^

Correct. The most obvious example of this is Camden Yards, the home of the Baltimore Orioles. They were the first to move back into the downtown, and made excellent use of an old warehouse, which has an uncanny resemblance to the one by CostCo. The whole of American sport thought they were mad when they moved there nearly 20 years ago, but what they did is now the blueprint which has been copied many times over there.

http://baltimore.orioles.mlb.com/bal/ballpark/index.jsp
 
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