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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you think the status of the downtowns listed will be in the next ten years, as far as entertainment, livability, neighborhood amenities, transportation, etc.



Dallas
Miami
Houston
Atlanta
Tampa
Orlando
San Antonio
Norfolk
Charlotte
Austin
Nashville
New Orleans
Memphis
Jacksonville
Louisville
Richmond
Birmingham



BTW, I only posted cities with a metro population of 1 million +.
 

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I agree - considering the decline all went through until the 1990's, all we have to go is up. I would almost bet that all these downtown populations have increased since 2000 - though this isn't replacing suburban sprawl, it is at least providing an alternative.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lakelander said:
I think they'll all be denser and in in much better shape than they are today.
I think most of them are dense enough in their cores, while on the outskirts may be an overload of surface parking, but denser does not always mean better. For example, with all of the future development happening in Charlotte it very well may be better than some central business districts listed, but it still would not be denser than most even at their current state.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
TheBrad said:
I agree - considering the decline all went through until the 1990's, all we have to go is up. I would almost bet that all these downtown populations have increased since 2000 - though this isn't replacing suburban sprawl, it is at least providing an alternative.
oh well. most cities have suburban sprawl even the ones with great urban cores. it may not replace suburban sprawl, but imo it is always better to develop from the core and work your way outward. when a city has a great urban core that it can claim it sort of overshadows the reputation of having suburban sprawl. have you been to san diego recently?
 

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texasboy said:
oh well. most cities have suburban sprawl even the ones with great urban cores. it may not replace suburban sprawl, but imo it is always better to develop from the core and work your way outward. when a city has a great urban core that it can claim it sort of overshadows the reputation of having suburban sprawl. have you ever been to san diego?
Yes I have & despite some urbanist's protest - I love San Diego.

I'm not dismissing the development of a strong downtown's impact on it's greater metro area, but we are all often naieve in thinking that the greater the growth in intown areas the less growth is occuring in suburban areas. It's unfortunately not true - but by building a stronger downtown & intown urban area, we can hopefully over time influence more smart growth & less sprawling growth.
 

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Which ever of these cities that successfully addresses the issue will enhance their competitve position both nationally and globally.
 

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micropundit said:
Which ever of these cities that successfully addresses the issue will enhance their competitve position both nationally and globally.
I think there are at least a dozen things that would top strong downtowns in that regard--education, crime, etc.

Having a strong downtown without addressing issues such as other deteriorating neighborhoods, declining inner-ring suburbs, and so on, is like having a facelift.
 

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Richmond has done a great job, and I look for it to be alot better in 10 years.
Roanoke=dead.
All of the rest will be alot better, IMO, as well. Like stated above, after the bad 1990's, they can only get better.
 

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sleepy said:
Having a strong downtown without addressing issues such as other deteriorating neighborhoods, declining inner-ring suburbs, and so on, is like having a facelift.
That is true - but which comes first? Not having a strong downtown sounds like it could be just as bad. From that list of cities - all are assumed to have strong / stronger downtowns within 10 years, but for those that don't - that is the distinction between them all that I see.

Not that I disagree with your point regarding inner-ring suburbs or outer ring urban neighborhoods. But the last time our nations' cities addressed the issue with declining neighborhoods was in the 1960's, that was urban renewal. I think the market is the strongest ally for improving neighborhoods
 

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micropundit said:
Which ever of these cities that successfully addresses the issue will enhance their competitve position both nationally and globally.

not true,because miami already addressed sprawl once it ran out of land and the udrb line wasn't moved but yet miami still sucks as globally
 

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I think Charlotte's current boom will have subsided (unless the economy surges a la 1990s again), and it will have moved into a stage of stable development. The city core will be largely residential at that point, so I'd expect to see some significant improvements in retail and other amenities. I-485 and at least part of the rail project will be complete, allowing traffic to move more freely and providing extra options for city dwellers.

Most of all I think we'll see some of the typical mature-urban problems start to set in: crime, abandoned buildings, perhaps a bit of dirt (though I can't really imagine Charlotte not being clean). Hopefully by that time we'll also start to see some more development in the "culture" districts.
 

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texasboy, i gotta question for you. Why do you think Dallas's downtown will be ahead of Houston's when Houston's downtown already outranks Dallas's in terms of entertainment. Dallas's downtown is at least 7 years behind Houston, although the uptown area is connecting the area quite rapidly.

texasboy said:
What do you think the status of the downtowns listed will be in the next ten years, as far as entertainment, livability, neighborhood amenities, transportation, etc.



Dallas
Miami
Houston
Atlanta
Tampa
Orlando
San Antonio
Norfolk
Charlotte
Austin
Nashville
New Orleans
Memphis
Jacksonville
Louisville
Richmond
Birmingham



BTW, I only posted cities with a metro population of 1 million +.
 

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It was random order, I believe he stated.
 

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he put them by metro pop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here are my thoughts on the four largest cities. I will try to do the rest later. Do not take this as criticism, but more as a critique.


Dallas - Not much change in the next ten years. Neighboring areas are stealing the potential of downtown Dallas such as Uptown.

Miami - Currently has one of the largest residential booms in the nation, but there are not enough neighborhood amenities such as grocery stores, green space, and retail that would raise the success of downtown.

Houston - putting amenities first and population second. In the next ten years, i think the cbd will be filled with neighborhood amenities that are currently approved, proposed or under construction such as grocery stores, green space, soft goods retail, and new rail lines but it will still be served by the day time population.

Atlanta - Honestly, I get confused with developments happening in midtown and downtown, but I will try. A slight residential boom it seems like but it seems as if there are areas within downtown's vicinity that attract people who want an all around urban lifestyle. Sort of like Dallas. DT Atlanta has the population, but it does not seem like they would have the amenities to keep its residents inside the boundaries to do their day to day routine.
 

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Houston's amenities will be able to servive without a large DT population base, due to the proximity of midtown, so, DT will be able to develop even without a new residential component, which is still preferred.
 

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New Orleans will be quite different. Much more dense and alot more beautiful....Millions of dollars in spending is just getting underway in landscaping and new sidewalks for Canal St. alone. And it'll be even more of a playground.
 
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