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posted for devilmind, but interesting to read:

Saleh and Daoud Al-Kuwaity

Saleh (1908-1986) and Daud (1910-1976) Al-Kuwaity were born in Kuwait to a family from an Iraqi origin. Their father, a merchant, moved to Kuwait from the Iraqi city of Basra together with some other 50 Jewish families to form the Jewish community of Kuwait. When Saleh was 10 years old, and Daud 8, they received a gift from their uncle who came back from a business trip to India – a Violin and an Oud. So started their love affair with music, an affair that would one day lead them to become two of the greatest musicians and performers in the history of Iraqi music.

Saleh began studying Iraqi and Kuwaiti music from Haled El-Bakar, a famous Oud player of the time. He soon began to compose his own music. His first song, "Walla Ajbani Jamalec" (By God, I love your beauty), is still heard on Persian Gulf radio stations.{{db-author)) While still children, the brothers started performing before dignitaries in Kuwait and making a name for themselves as "wunderkinds". Soon enough, Iraqi record companies began recording the brothers and distributing their music throughout the Kingdom of Iraq. Because of Saleh & Daud's success, the Al-Kuwaity family moved back to Basra in Iraq. There Saleh joined the Qanun master Azur, and learned from him the secrets of writing in the "Makam" style of composition, considered the highest and most prestigious of all styles in Arab music. The brothers started performing in the nightclubs of Basra, and after a while – a result of their growing success – the family moved to Baghdad.

The Iraqi capital, one of the biggest musical centers in the Arab world at the time, welcomed the brothers. Saleh composed the works and Daud performed them. Saleh also started attending music school in Baghdad. There he studied both Arab and western music, and soon began receiving requests from artists who wanted him to write music for them. And so he did including, amongst others, most of the hits of the singer Salima Mourad. In 1933, at the peak of their success, the brothers were approached by one of the greatest names in Arab music, the Egyptian superstar Um-Kultum. The singer, who rarely recorded works by non-Egyptian composers, contacted Saleh during one of her visits to Baghdad and asked him to write a song for her. The song, " "(Your heart is a rock), became one of the regulars in Um-Kultum's repertoire. Another great Egyptian artist who came to Baghdad and asked to work with the two was Muhammad Abed-el Wahab. In 1932 Abed-el-Wahab arrived in Baghdad and asked to meet and play with the brothers. Saleh, who hoped to expand his musical horizons through the meeting with Abed-el-Wahab, was amazed to discover that the great musician actually wanted to learn from Daud and him. Saleh taught Abed-el-Wahab to use the Lahami scale, unique to Selah's music, which was later used in many of Abed-el-Wahab's famous works.

The brother's success didn't go unnoticed by the Iraqi noble ruling class, and soon they became King Faisal's favorite entertainers. They performed for him and composed music for various formal events - the highlight being a piece composed by Saleh for the King's coronation ceremony. In 1936 Iraq's Minister of Education asked Daud and Saleh to take part in establishing Iraq's first radio station. The two became founding members of Iraqi radio and, together with the Egyptian singer Fat'hia Ahmad, performed and played in the initiation ceremony. From that day, up onto their immigration to Israel, they played in the station's orchestra – of which Saleh was named director. At the same time they also played on King Faisal's private radio station.

The Al-Kuwaity brothers continued performing and playing throughout the Arab world up until the 1950s, gaining fame and influence with both the mass of listeners and the Iraqi political elite. They recorded hundreds of works, some of them incorporating western elements such as Waltz. In addition to mastering the high Makam style they also wrote songs in the "Aa'thba" style – popular music with themes of sadness and loss. The brothers also composed music for the cinema, including the music for an Arabic version of Romeo and Juliet, and worked with some of the greatest actors in the Arab world. Saleh and Daud performed regularly on Iraqi radio and continued taking part in the kingdom's major national events. They also set up two clubs in which their concerts were held – one for the summer and one for the winter.

Throughout their career, the brothers never hid their Jewish identity. They made use of their fame and fortune to help the Jewish community in Iraq, both with material aid for the needy and with influence in the political establishment when necessary. In the beginning of the 1950s, they decided to leave Baghdad and join the big wave of emigration from Iraq to the newly-established Israel. In spite of their wealth and of the wide range of possibilities before them Saleh and Daud chose to leave everything behind. They emigrated to the young Jewish state even without using their connections to gain permission to take their property with them.

Saleh and Daud's status in Iraq was of no use to them when faced with the difficulties of finding their place in Israel. Their welcome in the new country was harsh – they and their families were sprayed with DDT (like all other immigrants at that time), and then sent to live in a temporary tent camp. The Israeli establishment looked down on Arab culture, treating it with indifference or worse, with disdain and contempt.

In Israel the brothers were forced to become part of the low and narrow ghetto designated for Arab culture. Nevertheless, they continued being central anchors for the community of immigrants from the Arab world in general and Iraq in particular. Upon their arrival Saleh and Daud began playing and performing in the Arab channel of "The Voice of Israel" (Israeli radio), soon becoming two of its leaders. For many years they gave a regular live radio performance, with thousands of people in Israel and millions in Iraq and Kuwait listening. With the help of the radio dozens of songs written by them in Israel became hits in the Arab world. Despite leaving their homeland, and the state of war between Israel and the Arab world, the radio in Kuwait and Iraq kept on broadcasting their music – omitting their name and nationality. Their hits are still played on the radio throughout the Arab world and they have fans among both the Iraqi and Kuwaiti people and with Iraqi and Kuwaiti ex-patriots throughout the world. Songs such as "El-Hajer Muada R'ariba" (Neglect isn't a foreign custom), "Hadri Chai Hadri" (Make the tea), "Ma Tkuli Ya Hilu Min Wen Alla Jibec" (Tell me, beautiful one, from where did the Lord bring you?) and "Walla Ajbani Jamalec" ( ), are heard daily throughout the Arab world and are a central plank in the canon of Iraqi and Kuwaiti music.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saleh_and_Daoud_Al-Kuwaity"
 

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"Hadri Chai Hadri" (Make the tea)

what they ran out of subjects?
:D
 

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livni said:
"Hadri Chai Hadri" (Make the tea)

what they ran out of subjects?
:D
actually the song goes like khadri el chai khadri not as Hadri Chai Hadri ;)
 

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Its the same, just in arabic you use Kh for translating that sound, which is smarter, and we use just H which creates problem between normal H and Kh but we know when is when in hebrew like haifa is kh and herzelia is h.
 

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Kuwait4Ever said:
Man wat the hell ma3indohom shughul making some songs about tea
back then the chai cultural had very strong influence ...... :jk:
 

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So how do you say “shay” or “chay”? my teacher pronounced “shay”..
livni said:
Its the same, just in arabic you use Kh for translating that sound, which is smarter, and we use just H which creates problem between normal H and Kh but we know when is when in hebrew like haifa is kh and herzelia is h.
There is no rule to translate it with just 1 “h”. I always write “kh” and some write “ch” which I also fail to understand.
 

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Yah... I know... I was referring to classic Arabic. I should have been more clear. I was aware that because of the interaction of Persian and Arabic in the Persian Gulf area, that sound is used is the countries that surround the Persian Gulf.

Do you guys also use the letters P and G and the sound of sion (like in vision)?
 

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Prince of Persia
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so kuwaities can say chai? cool can you also say peddo, or papa or piss? C'est une blague :p
 

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panj-delaavaraan said:
Chay is actually a persian word; since arabic does not have the letter "CH", they say Shay instead.
The word "chai" is actually Indian.

Chai is the Hindi word for tea, deriving from the Chinese chá (see the main article on tea for etymology). In English, the term is used to refer to what is more properly known as masala chai ("spiced tea").

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chai
 

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Prince of Persia
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jup your right i new it was chinese
 

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source
thnx for the story
pic :


songs:
http://www.zeryab.com/E/Daud_Al_Kuwaiti_Aswat.htm

lol for the chai controversy "anything can spark up controversy between arabs and persians :p" im half blood so im pure controversy here haha
however
saying ch or anything that isnt in classic arabic
dont u guys know that no one speaks classic arabic and it dose not exist except on paper
its a dead language and we all have our own languages in each country "sorry accents :p"
classic arabic is very dead if it wasnt for the quran we would have our own languages by now
so CH is in the kuwaiti language
alan moshkil chiyeh :bash:
 

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Prince of Persia
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We say or chai or chahi.
 
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