SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My dear Seoul.. I must admit I'm missing the city a bit these days. Good
excuse to post a few memorabilia shots on ssc.

Boramae is one of the numerous "skyscraper clusters" of Seoul. It's located
on the south shore of the Han river not too far from Shilim station. Other
than the cool looking glass towers, there's a Lotte department store, and
some fun side streets with a few bars and restos.

























Love how the guy in the first couple of pictures holds all the stuff for his
girlfriend, hehe. Won't see this happening in the west for sure ;)

cheers
 

·
Seoul-jah
Joined
·
460 Posts
very nice pics. I have not been here yet, but it sure is a nice cluster. btw, isn't holding shopping bags for your girlfriend common in the west? I thought every guy in the world did it.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
mookiecece said:
very nice pics. I have not been here yet, but it sure is a nice cluster. btw, isn't holding shopping bags for your girlfriend common in the west? I thought every guy in the world did it.
I noticed a more equitable distribution of weight between partners usually in the US. But I must admit I don't have much first hand experience yet in this matter around here (no pun intended) ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
331 Posts
"Love how the guy in the first couple of pictures holds all the stuff for his
girlfriend, hehe. Won't see this happening in the west for sure"

Haha, I hope you're being sarcastic. Men being "pussywhipped" spreads all around the world. :D

BTW, thanks for the pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Im missing Seoul as well these days...--;;; But your pictures cheered me up POS:)
 

·
Seoul-jah
Joined
·
460 Posts
princeofseoul said:
I noticed a more equitable distribution of weight between partners usually in the US. But I must admit I don't have much first hand experience yet in this matter around here (no pun intended) ;)
haha, hope you get to have more experience here ;), even though sometimes it could be an irritable experience. :D
 

·
Gosford/Sydney.
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
Japan and Korea,although having a different language and culture,do share many things in common.The cities seem to follow a similar pattern of street scape
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
Nick said:
Japan and Korea,although having a different language and culture,do share many things in common.The cities seem to follow a similar pattern of street scape
because they are close each other geographically.. that's why
and I can't really believe that this huge "borame" park is just a part of building cluster in Seoul.. it actually looks like a city itself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Because when modern Korean cities were designed and constructed after Korean war and during the beginning industrialization ,Korea had to import Japanese civil and architecturing engineering technology ,designs and materials mainly.(because Korea had no technology and experince for them at that time)

well it was basically the same during the colonial period.

Korea now has relatively competitive civil engineering and construction companies,
But their core roots still have traced back to the beginning trends .

Thats all.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
gentlejunho said:
Because when modern Korean cities were designed and constructed after Korean war and during the beginning industrialization ,Korea had to import Japanese civil and architecturing engineering technology ,designs and materials mainly.(because Korea had no technology and experince for them at that time)
At least in the downtown areas, the street layout of Seoul and Tokyo is similar and the small houses look a bit the same from a distance. But, looking closely, post-WW2 Japanese and Korean houses are built in a different way using different materials. If Korean construction companies gathered some knowledge from abroad, it must be from Europe (for the small houses & so-called villas) or the US (for the skyscrapers). I cannot believe the "construction knowledge" came from Japan: it wouldn't make any sense.
 

·
future is today.
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
princeofseoul said:
If Korean construction companies gathered some knowledge from abroad, it must be from Europe (for the small houses & so-called villas) or the US (for the skyscrapers). I cannot believe the "construction knowledge" came from Japan: it wouldn't make any sense.
I think you are quite right.
As for the skyscraper, architecturing engineering technology came from mainly US.
But korean first skyscraper , Samil building was built by korean technology and korean architect( 김중업, Kim jung-up ), although some people say that it had a resemblance to Seagram building in New York City.
At any rate, it was praiseworthy to build such a skyscraper(31-storey building) in korea at that time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
princeofseoul said:
At least in the downtown areas, the street layout of Seoul and Tokyo is similar and the small houses look a bit the same from a distance. But, looking closely, post-WW2 Japanese and Korean houses are built in a different way using different materials. If Korean construction companies gathered some knowledge from abroad, it must be from Europe (for the small houses & so-called villas) or the US (for the skyscrapers). I cannot believe the "construction knowledge" came from Japan: it wouldn't make any sense.
Thank you very much for your different perspective,

Let me just add my humble perspective,

The outward laoyout is mixing by where the core design from and what materials were used ,as far as I know,Koreans had very few architecture designer even to the 1990.(yes including American and maybe possibly European style included)

I think I said wrong in terms of 'architecture' because its exactly depends on the designers blue printing,

But what I meant is the whole trend of civil engineering and construction,
the style of laying down the roads,traffics ,connecting electronics by light pole,subway and train station ,sewers etc definitely designed by Japanese imported technology.(although the completion and maintenance status makes the difference in outward looking)

I think Koreans for sure wanted more divirsified sources but unfortunately there were not many Korean human forces who were familiar with other languages than Japanese at that time and the economic situation of Korea was nowhere even able to make copyright contraction with western publishers.


The majority Korean engineering major students had to be heavily depends on the textbooks that translated originally from written in Japanese even untill 1990's. (recently the source varies nationality but still large part of college textbook depends on the foreign translated books-means theres not many creative korean ones) ,

I am not architecture or civil engineering major(so maybe I am wrong-sorry ) but my major(its also engineering) has the same tendency what I mentioned above.

Like every modern western originated knowledges and concepts that currently learned and practiced in Korea stayed in Japan for sometimes and then imported to korea and translated . (therefore they are not authentic but japanized and then finally koreanized version )


I personally do not like Japanese style aesthetics in terms of building and landscape architecture designs because its seems artificial to my eyes, Korea had been influnced by those artificial style that came from Japan but its Koreanized by adding extremity and lacks of perfection degree at the same time.

Therefore I personally think modern Korean landscape architecture designs lost beauty and good harmony with nature anyways .

For example ,looking at signboards hanging on the buildings in Korea ,
They look really ugly and confusing(because it focused only for the advertizing convenience ), thats one good example how Japanese concept becomes Koreanized.

Yes being added with extremity without adding serious new things for Korean situation.

I personally think SE Asian countries have much ahead landscape architecture design sense(because its usually shown as well balanced with naturral scenes ) and actually its affected by real authentic European designers. The buildings of course closer to Europeans.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
@gentlejunho

This is a short summary of modern korean architecture:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_architecture

I don't agree with everything in there, but it's more or less accurate I think. In 1953, Seoul was pretty much all destroyed and needed a rebuilt. From the 60s to the 80s or so, korean buildings' architecture and urban planning were mostly influenced by the west.

A korean house built in those years looks radically different from a Japanese house built in the same time period, from the inside and from the outside. Very different materials were used as well. I cannot believe that the western influence first went to Japan and then to Korea. Korean houses built in the 70s and 80s are modernized versions of traditional korean houses, and the modern twists to these houses cannot be found in Japanese houses built in the same time period.

From the mid 80s, Korea started to develop suburbs and towns in a unique way, which I find very ingenuous. There's some western influence to Ilsan or to Changwon, it's undeniable, but at the same time it's sooo korean in a way. You won't find suburbs or small towns like those anywhere else.

As for city and road planning, I see modern Seoul as a natural progression of older Seoul with wide large streets and labyrinthmic small streets. Modern Tokyo also feels this way, probably because the two cities in the past had a similar urban design. As for lots of billboards and advertising, this is not japanese per se: you can find this in many large asian or north-american cities. The number of neons will scale with the population density.

Japan influenced korea mostly with the trains and the subways I think. I find this to be a good thing as Japan makes really really good train systems that I appreciate a lot. As for the sewage system, I must admit my ignorance as I haven't been there yet.

But there's also a korean influence on japanese life. Some apartments with heated floors are appearing in Tokyo; soju is so widespread in bars it comes in all sorts of flavours, even in warm fashion. Maybe the next thing to appear will be these magnetic cash cards in the Tokyo subway: I'm eagerly waiting for that day ;)

PS: which university did you attend in Korea?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
princeofseoul said:
@gentlejunho

This is a short summary of modern korean architecture:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_architecture

I don't agree with everything in there, but it's more or less accurate I think. In 1953, Seoul was pretty much all destroyed and needed a rebuilt. From the 60s to the 80s or so, korean buildings' architecture and urban planning were mostly influenced by the west.

A korean house built in those years looks radically different from a Japanese house built in the same time period, from the inside and from the outside. Very different materials were used as well. I cannot believe that the western influence first went to Japan and then to Korea. Korean houses built in the 70s and 80s are modernized versions of traditional korean houses, and the modern twists to these houses cannot be found in Japanese houses built in the same time period.

From the mid 80s, Korea started to develop suburbs and towns in a unique way, which I find very ingenuous. There's some western influence to Ilsan or to Changwon, it's undeniable, but at the same time it's sooo korean in a way. You won't find suburbs or small towns like those anywhere else.

As for city and road planning, I see modern Seoul as a natural progression of older Seoul with wide large streets and labyrinthmic small streets. Modern Tokyo also feels this way, probably because the two cities in the past had a similar urban design. As for lots of billboards and advertising, this is not japanese per se: you can find this in many large asian or north-american cities. The number of neons will scale with the population density.

Japan influenced korea mostly with the trains and the subways I think. I find this to be a good thing as Japan makes really really good train systems that I appreciate a lot. As for the sewage system, I must admit my ignorance as I haven't been there yet.

But there's also a korean influence on japanese life. Some apartments with heated floors are appearing in Tokyo; soju is so widespread in bars it comes in all sorts of flavours, even in warm fashion. Maybe the next thing to appear will be these magnetic cash cards in the Tokyo subway: I'm eagerly waiting for that day ;)

PS: which university did you attend in Korea?
Prince of Seoul,

Thank you very much for your kind and long reply.

I will check and think about it more,thank you for your correction as well.

I am in the last year of my course ,hmm my univirsity is located in Shinchon.
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
BEAUTIFUL PICTURES! What a surprise!

I lived in that Boramae/Shillim area for one year.. now I'm in the HongDae area.

What a surprise to see pictures of my old neighborhood.. few if any people (even those living in Seoul) go there.. nice surprise.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top