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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there, this is my first post on the forum, and can I say, what a great forum this is. I've had a look around, and almost all of the buildings I've seen have been astounding, and such in-depth descriptions and discussion about them have been really impressive.

I'm a student from Glasgow, Scotland, and I'm hoping to study Architecture at university next year, namely Glasgow School of Art and Edinburgh College of Art. I have started a couple of designs, with research to back them up, and a little research into contemporary and historical architects. I'm hoping to write an essay or 2 comparing work of two architects from different time periods. My model-making is slow, and I don't have any completed pieces (other than one I made 2 years ago for a school project - student accommodation on the River Clyde, if you were wondering), though I intend on creating more. I have attained most of the Higher qualifications that I need for admittance, with the lack of 1 B (ABBB in the case of Glasgow School of Art, and BBBB in the case of Edinburgh College of Art)

Higher-
A- Art & Design
B- Computing
B- Mathematics
C- English
C- Physics
C- RMPS

Adv. Higher-
C- Art & Design

Essentially, I'm looking for assistance in creating my 10 pieces for entry at Glasgow, and what would be the most important elements someone would look for when determining what candidates to be admitted. Also, as I lack 1 B, would this be extremely detrimental, or would my C in Advanced High, or my 3 C Highers make up for this?

Lastly, has anyone studied architecture where a portfolio was required, and if so (or even if you haven't :D), what did you include, and what should I?

Many thanks for the help, I hope I'm not stepping over the line with such a big request. :blahblah::lol:
 

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I'll give you some ideas. I got a place in the Liverpool School of Architecure 3 years ago or so and my courses weren't that relevant so it was probably on the basis of my portfolio (didn't do an interview) so hopefully i can help.

I think most agree that you have to demonstrate that you're a technologist and a creative.

First technicality-wise it's probably a good idea to demonstrate that you're good at making things. So maybe as you haven't done much model-making you could document some woodwork or metalwork you've done in the past, photograph it in that wankerific way they do on places like referencelibrary and then bulk it up with notes talking about how some ancient construction techniques are still relevant or something.

Maybe try some technical drawing. Focus on a specific building or a specific style/architect. That'll make it seem less arbitrary. Try to work from your own photographs again to keep the continuity. If you're worried about including each drawing as 'separate items" just do it as if the item is a page of your sketchbook. Again maybe some notes but don't make them too lofty. Note the construction techniques and the context of the style (to show you're a good academic too).

Do some simple sketchup drawings for your housing project thing if you haven't already.. just to show you're familiar with CAD.

To show your creativity... Well I think any sort of artist should have an idea of their work's relevance. As a future architect especially you should pick work with eyeopening/relevant social and geographical themes. I know it seems obvious but more and more people these days think things like polariod pictures of feet/the sky or whatever are worthy of the art school.

Some ideas... If you do photography then doing a photo essay of your local sink estate might be a bit too obvious. Maybe instead do something about the recession so empty shops talking about the death of the highstreet, or perhaps you could photograph the cheap and meaningless public art you get these days.. then you could expand on that by doing sketches (it's v. important to show you're a good sketcher) of how you could change each sculpture with minimal effort to make them more meaningful... and so showing how good design doesn't have to be expensive.

It might be an idea to include an oil painting. I wouldn't know much about that but look into what will alsop does - http://www.google.co.uk/images?clie...8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=563&bih=632

what not to do - http://browse.deviantart.com

Basically just try and understand what an architect is today and illustrate that you know that but don't say it. Don't say things like "I'm passionate about the built environment".
 

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if you want something else to sketch that isn't buildings try some nice old tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the response! I'll be getting to work on that tomorrow. I've got some materials in (strawboard, cardboard, polystyrene, etc.), so I'm going to get some detailed drawings finished, investigations, and then get some basic floor plan models made, ending up with some representational models.

Thanks for the speedy response - I'll let you know how I get on.
 

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joyadesuza - I agree with everything that kids has said. I'm currently studying postgraduate architecture at Leeds.

The main thing is to prove you are a hard working creative individual - models are an excellent way of demonstrating this. Architecture fits into a social/political framework so it's good to have an understanding of the world. When you get to uni the first things you work on will be stripped back, theoretical projects. Don't expect floor plans straight away... and you must be able to take criticism - it'll come at you your entire career! Good luck!
 
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