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I've been to Europe many times, and one thing that I rarely see is suburb communities. In America, thats all you see. Not even in Europe, but in Africa, Asia, and even South American, there aren't that many suburbs, most countries don't even have them at all. Sure there are the occational London suburbs, but even those are small compared to the U.S. It seems the U.S. is all suburb, country, and some times cities. If you compare our cities to other european cities, they do not dominate. In Spain, a city by the name of Orense, (Grandma's house it up there) or Ourense, has a population of about 110,000-120,000, and it looks more like a city then lets say philly. I was puzzled when I went there and found out the population. It felt much more. Then i relized thre are no suburbs there. Villages, but thats it. Village-country-city, thats there layout. Same goes for portugal. Thats why European cities beat American cities. So my question is why aren't there suburbs in most countries? Do people like living in apartments, or mabye cant afford a house?
 

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From wikipedia:
In American English, the word "suburb" usually refers to a separate municipality or an unincorporated area outside of a central city. This definition is evident, for example, in the title of David Rusk's book Cities Without Suburbs, which promotes metropolitan government. Colloquial usage sometimes shortens the term to "'burb" (with or without the apostrophe), and "The Burbs" first appeared as a term for the suburbs of Chicagoland.

In Britain, Ireland and New Zealand, "suburbs" are merely residential neighbourhoods outside of the city centre. For example, Wimbledon is considered a suburb of London, England. In New Zealand suburbs can also be inner city areas, such as Te Aro in Wellington.
Simply put, American definition of suburb is not universal.
 

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in eastern europe, most cant afford a house.. in spain, most of the people live in appartements, in madrid you can see that clearly, but i dont know why.

theires a lot of these american type suburbs in france
 

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Is simple, only USA has the abondance of free land to allow for sprawl, while in Europe and most of Asia, land is scarse.
 

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warmaster08876 said:
I've been to Europe many times, and one thing that I rarely see is suburb communities. In America, thats all you see. Not even in Europe, but in Africa, Asia, and even South American, there aren't that many suburbs, most countries don't even have them at all. Sure there are the occational London suburbs, but even those are small compared to the U.S. It seems the U.S. is all suburb, country, and some times cities. If you compare our cities to other european cities, they do not dominate. In Spain, a city by the name of Orense, (Grandma's house it up there) or Ourense, has a population of about 110,000-120,000, and it looks more like a city then lets say philly. I was puzzled when I went there and found out the population. It felt much more. Then i relized thre are no suburbs there. Villages, but thats it. Village-country-city, thats there layout. Same goes for portugal. Thats why European cities beat American cities. So my question is why aren't there suburbs in most countries? Do people like living in apartments, or mabye cant afford a house?
You can't be serious. Almost every major European cities have sprawling suburbs. As a tourist, you probably stayed
only in city centres, that's why you don't realize there are suburbs. Take Paris for example: there are only 2 million
people in the city proper, and 9 million people in the suburbs, but tourists only visit the city proper, so they have no
clue there exist sprawling suburbs. Here are some pictures of the suburbs in Paris.

Eastern suburbs:


Eastern suburbs:


Western suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:
 

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Hamburg has a lot of quarters where single family houses dominate, even some near the city centre. By the british definition they could be called suburbs, but not by the american definition, as they are not seperate municipalities. But there are also municipalities around Hamburg which can be called suburbs (in german we say "Vorort"): i.e. Norderstedt (a town with 80.000 inhabitants), Schenefeld, Neu Wulmstorf.
Hamburg is a special case though, because in the city proper are also rural areas and village-like settlements included.
 

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I live in a suburb in the Netherlands. It has it's own small centre with a mall and some office towers. But if you need something or are working we have to go to the big city Utrecht.
 

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As you can see on the map above Utrecht is the biggest and most important city in the Agglomeration Utrecht,a s you can see on the map above.
It has rail lines going to all the sub urbs around the city.
Cities like Houten, Nieuwegein, Ijsselsteijn, Vleuten, Maarssen, Breukelen, De Bilt and Zeist.
280.000 people are living in the city Utrecht, 300.000 in the Suburbs.
Currently the city is expanding, west of the city(Between Vleuten and De Meern) 30.000 houses are build with an estimated population of 120.000 in 2012.
After 2012 the city will expand to the Southwest. Plans are on the drwaing table.

More info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utrecht_(agglomeration)
 

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I think the original poster meant American (and Australian etc) style suburbs.

There are some in Europe, but not many. There are however suburbs, but they are nothing like the ones in the US.

And I wouldn't call anything outside the Paris citycore suburbs either, like someone suggested...
 

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I think Europe has less suburbs because European cities are very old. In Medieval times everyone wanted to live in the city for defense, behind the city walls. The automobile is what made urban sprawl happen. Unlike European cities many American cities have developed in the age of the automobile. Now that many Europeans own cars, people can live further apart and there are more and more suburbs popping up in Europe. For example the areas outside Paris are growing rapidly.
 

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Of course there are suburbs outside of the US ive been to europe and seen them they even have exurbs. You drive along country roads sometimes and see just a cluster of homes and then empty land. Even though they dont take up as much land as in America they still have suburbs everywhere where there are detatched homes.
 

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brisavoine said:
You can't be serious. Almost every major European cities have sprawling suburbs. As a tourist, you probably stayed
only in city centres, that's why you don't realize there are suburbs. Take Paris for example: there are only 2 million
people in the city proper, and 9 million people in the suburbs, but tourists only visit the city proper, so they have no
clue there exist sprawling suburbs. Here are some pictures of the suburbs in Paris.

Eastern suburbs:


Eastern suburbs:


Western suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:


Northwestern suburbs:


WOW! Those definitely count as suburbs. I had no idea they had suburbs like that in Europe. I also think the fact that America is a much larger country in land area has something to do with it. If all of the European cities had suburban hinterlands as large as those in the US, most of the continent would probably be covered by them.
 

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Europe--old cities that developed before the age of the car and during the need for city protection.

U.S.--Most cities developed after the age of the car. Cities like New York and other older, dense cities had suburbs boom during "white flight" (something that European cities havent experienced)--where the people with money left the crime ridden, polluted, and cities underperforming school system. Also take into account the taxes and costs are more in a city..you also have to put up with much more bullshit. I could build a McMansion and it would be much, much cheaper than a house of the same size in the city. Take into account that America has a huge population and has bigger families--something that contributes for people moving to the suburbs. You cant blame people for doing this--and besides, America has always been about having your own land and doing as you please. Unlike Europeans and Asians, most Americans dont like being cramped up in some small neighborhood or apartment building.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
lotrfan55345 said:
No suburbs? Just look at google earth...
But can you really consider those suburbs. There dense but overall, still look part of the city. In fact, much of them still look like Paris itself.
 

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Barcelona don`t have space for this type of suburbs (Many mountains in the metropolitan area), but in Madrid yes.

This one is a new city for 100.000 inhabitants in Madrid, nowadays it has approximately 45.00 inhabitants

pics: euubeeuropa..










Other city in Madrid: Nuevo Baztán:


 
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