Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's look at the suburban areas in cities with more than one major city. Perhaps the following are good examples:

Bay Area: San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose
Twin Cities: Minneapolis, St. Paul
Metroplex: Dallas, Fort Worth
Baltimore/Washington

What determines which of the cities in the metro area the strongest attraction exists?

Obviously relative distance to each city is an issue, but do other factors exist? How about prominance? Does San Francisco have a greater pull than Oakland or San Jose? Dallas more than Ft. Worth? Mpls more than St. Paul?

Are there suburbs that are equally attracted to two cities?

Some possible examples:

• Do East Bay areas outside of Oakland feel more of a pull towards Oakland or San Francisco? Places like Berkeley, Alameda, San Leandro...even areas across the hills like Walnut Creek. SF is the shining light, but Oakland is right next door.

• Do South Bay/Silicon Valley folks feel apart from the SF/E. Bay/Marin heart of the Bay Area and give San Jose more status because of this distance?

• Where in the Metroplex does the tilt towards Dallas become the tilt towards St. Paul?

• Baltimore and Washington were once separate metro areas. Does how a suburb developed (of Baltimore or of DC) make a difference today?

• Does Minneapolis tend to be the draw for virtually all the Twin Cities area...even the far eastern portions?
 

·
Baltimore/DC Corridorite
Joined
·
587 Posts
Let's look at the suburban areas in cities with more than one major city. Perhaps the following are good examples:

Bay Area: San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose
Twin Cities: Minneapolis, St. Paul
Metroplex: Dallas, Fort Worth
Baltimore/Washington

What determines which of the cities in the metro area the strongest attraction exists?

Obviously relative distance to each city is an issue, but do other factors exist? How about prominance? Does San Francisco have a greater pull than Oakland or San Jose? Dallas more than Ft. Worth? Mpls more than St. Paul?

Are there suburbs that are equally attracted to two cities?

Some possible examples:

• Do East Bay areas outside of Oakland feel more of a pull towards Oakland or San Francisco? Places like Berkeley, Alameda, San Leandro...even areas across the hills like Walnut Creek. SF is the shining light, but Oakland is right next door.

• Do South Bay/Silicon Valley folks feel apart from the SF/E. Bay/Marin heart of the Bay Area and give San Jose more status because of this distance?

• Where in the Metroplex does the tilt towards Dallas become the tilt towards St. Paul?

• Baltimore and Washington were once separate metro areas. Does how a suburb developed (of Baltimore or of DC) make a difference today?

• Does Minneapolis tend to be the draw for virtually all the Twin Cities area...even the far eastern portions?
well right now there are 2 counties close to baltimore(1 of those borders it)
these are howard and anne arundel counties. but ive read that parts of the counties are more aligned towards washington and AI guess some are somewhat aligned like columbia or annapolis. so dc creeps up a bit into the basltimore msa. DC is the job machine with the much higher real estate prices.
 

·
sucks
Joined
·
2,261 Posts
Everything but Oakland and Santa Clara County* see San Francisco as the center.

*Except Palo Alto: they have a huge boner for SF, just like Berkeley, since it's basically College 2.0 these days.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
518 Posts
In the Baltimore-Washington Metroplex all of the Maryland suburbs (even those right across the border from DC) have a strong connection to Baltimore because we're in the same state and a maximum of 40 minutes away. In Bethesda, Silver Spring, etc it's pretty clear that we're all Washingtonians, but going "downtown" can mean going to Baltimore.

The same is true for the Baltimore suburbs where a very high percentage of the population works in the Washington MSA (increasingly so as the Washington job market is growing extremely rapidly).

There's a huge transitional zone where you don't know if people are Redskins/Nationals fans or Ravens/Orioles fans. This area exists in parts of Howard, Anne Arundel and Carrol County. However, even outside of this transition area there are many people that associate with the city they live further from. Either way, you're likely to hear people screaming "O" during that part of the National Anthem at Washington Nationals/Wizards/Redskins/Capitals/United games in keeping with Baltimore style in honor of our beloved O's (Orioles).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
In the Baltimore-Washington Metroplex all of the Maryland suburbs (even those right across the border from DC) have a strong connection to Baltimore because we're in the same state and a maximum of 40 minutes away. In Bethesda, Silver Spring, etc it's pretty clear that we're all Washingtonians, but going "downtown" can mean going to Baltimore.

The same is true for the Baltimore suburbs where a very high percentage of the population works in the Washington MSA (increasingly so as the Washington job market is growing extremely rapidly).

There's a huge transitional zone where you don't know if people are Redskins/Nationals fans or Ravens/Orioles fans. This area exists in parts of Howard, Anne Arundel and Carrol County. However, even outside of this transition area there are many people that associate with the city they live further from. Either way, you're likely to hear people screaming "O" during that part of the National Anthem at Washington Nationals/Wizards/Redskins/Capitals/United games in keeping with Baltimore style in honor of our beloved O's (Orioles).
good post...... i live here in Pasadena, about half-way between Annapolis and Baltimore, and although about 2/3 are Baltimore sports fans, many Redskins fans do mix into the population. Even though i would definetly consider this as Baltimore's suburbs, being only 10 minutes or so from the city.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,845 Posts
• Where in the Metroplex does the tilt towards Dallas become the tilt towards St. Paul?
I think you meant Ft. Worth. ;)

I've not yet been to Dallas-Ft. Worth, but as an outsider it would appear that Arlington is something of a shared suburb. The pre-2003 MSA designations had Ft. Worth and Arlington in one MSA, so perhaps it is tied a little more to Ft. Worth than Dallas.

All of the people I know that live in the MD suburbs of Washington identify with Washington and Washington only. In some cases, there is even an attitude of disgust towards Baltimore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
PG and Montgomery Counties do identify with DC more so than Baltimore. That has a lot to do with proximity. Most of the residents in PG are originally from the city. Plus parts of DC run into the burbs and the landscape is identical. Anne Arundel County has more of a Bmore vibe and I think Howard County is 60/40 leaning towards Baltimore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Modest,

I think you are mistaken about PG and Montgomery Counties having a strong connection to Bmore. In fact, I would say that it is just the opposite. But they do love the hell of out of the Orioles. In PG and Montgomery County, downtown means DC, all day and night. I hear people say that they are going to "The Harbor" in reference to downtown Baltimore.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It would be interesting to hear from some Bay Area folks. How much does proximity to either Oakland or San Jose mute the incredible draw of San Francisco?

Can a good argument be made that San Francisco's "suburbia" within the Bay Area mostly consists of Marin and the northern portions of the Peninsula (from Daly City to perhaps Hillsboro and Burlingame? That the lower peninsula and all of Silicon Valley is pulled towards San Jose? That East Bay has a definite pull towards Oakland?
 

·
Texas-NoVA
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
thank you, JR Ewing.
He's sort of correct, though. I would say probably more you leave Arlington going towards Ft. Worth. But the majority of the metroplex lives on the Dallas side and even counties like Denton to the north associates themselves with Dallas a bit more. Arlington does however tie itself to Ft. Worth a little more because it's closer to Ft. Worth than it is to Dallas and it's in Tarrant County.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top