SkyscraperCity banner

21 - 40 of 115 Posts

·
Idle waster.
hard work.
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
I have family living just off The Drive, he is a surgeon, makes good money and was in the right place at the right time during the property boom.

Nice house but still, no way i would pay over 500 000 to live in a semi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
Just back form a big walk this time we were investigating the big enormous houses in Gosforth, obviously I am still obsessed by who is living in them and what they do for a living. We walked down "The Drive" and in the middle of it was this stunning villa that was much older than any thing around it looking like a little stately home. What did I see?
The former stables for the (demolished) Coxlodge Hall perhaps?

Listing details: http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-304334-62-70-gosforth

I am looking for a photo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Yes that's the building. I seen many interesting houses today. That part of Gosforth is off the beaten track has no shops, bars or cafes just street after street of big houses.
Having said that I didn't find the street which I has the biggest houses I have ever seen, think it just before St Nicholas hospital. Speaking of which is that still open?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
On my great tour of Jesmond today I was reminded that there is a series of houses which I really admire. Obviously Victorian, I think it's the work of one architect, he uses terracotta plaques with arts and crafts motifs, often see nice stained glass on the house as well. Could it be Frank Rich?

I also was in Lindisfarne Close and found a stunning series of 1970s houses which I had never seen before but the highlight was the landscaping it was the best I had seen.

I think there is going to be real gems in the suburbs.

I would like to identify all my victorian dude's stuff and I would like to see the catalogue he was using to specify the plaques.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Yes I seen it and as soon as I have recovered form the "camera frenzy" I will get out there and track down every last bit of arts and crafts frippery stuck on a victorian house in the vicinity.
I have been stricken with a highly infectious strand of "camera frenzy" the outcome is always expensive, it starts with mild disappointment with my current camera and rapidly escalates in to reading reviews, going in to every camera shop in town, the buying of a camera magazine (which drives me mad as I hate every word and every photograph printed in them)
We are on to stage four of 'frenzy' where I have rounded up all the offending cameras, camera bags and a tripod for good measure and stuck them on to ebay with what ever else I can find so that a new camera can be bought.
This "cure" is good for at least two years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,787 Posts
Huntsmoor House

Have added this photograph to this thread as not sure where else it would fit in?



Huntsmoor House, Hunters Road, was built as a soldiers' home in 1899 to meet the social needs of those soldiers stationed at Fenham Barracks. More recently it was used as a warehouse by the Newcastle bookseller Thornes. A three-storey red brick structure, the design of Huntsmoor House is unusual, topped with a crenellated tower featuring carved shields and a flagpole. The central section is flanked by two arched windows that rise through two storeys, with a Tudor style exposed beam gable above.

Information taken from locality website http://www.spitaltongues.org.uk/spitaltongues.shtml

I tried to buy a flat in ST a long time ago but was outbid.
A somewhat forgotten area of Newcastle?
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,262 Posts
Have added this photograph to this thread as not sure where else it would fit in?

Huntsmoor House, Hunters Road, was built as a soldiers' home in 1899 to meet the social needs of those soldiers stationed at Fenham Barracks. More recently it was used as a warehouse by the Newcastle bookseller Thornes. A three-storey red brick structure, the design of Huntsmoor House is unusual, topped with a crenellated tower featuring carved shields and a flagpole. The central section is flanked by two arched windows that rise through two storeys, with a Tudor style exposed beam gable above.

Information taken from locality website http://www.spitaltongues.org.uk/spitaltongues.shtml

I tried to buy a flat in ST a long time ago but was outbid.
A somewhat forgotten area of Newcastle?
Some additional notes:

The site, building and furnishings cost £2,700.00 and was opened May 1899 to provide soldiers with a place where the comforts of a real home could be supplied. Lord Roberts was the guest of honour at the opening ceremony.

Architect was J.W. Taylor and builder, J. Jackson of Corporation Street, Newcastle. Of the original building the lower portion was built of red dressed Penshaw bricks, circular headed windows with leaded glass with the lead glazing supplied by J.G. Baguley and embossed glass by Reed Millican.

There were quarters for 2 married men and 13 single me. Married soldiers awaiting quarters in the Barracks could be put up temporarily in the home. Cost was 6 shillings and 9 pence a night.

Noted for cleanliness, cheap food and every social comfort. It had a billiard table, piano, organ and a phonograph. They also provided a Sunday school for the children of the soldiers.

Many men found the home a refuge and a help. Soldiers here on leave spoke of it as being the best in their experience for cleanliness, comfort and cheap good food, it even had lino on the floor instead of bare boards! The Soldiers Home lasted until 1938 and the premises were later taken over by Thorne’s and used as a warehouse and has now been converted in to living accommodation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
The new camera arrived at the same time as I got swamped with work!
Then I was able to spend productive time procrastinating over the work and the photography so thats a double score.
I "see" the photos all the time I just never have a camera with me.
What I am interested in taking pictures of houses, details of houses like the stained glass and doors, very interested in writings on buildings, painted sign writing and the thing I am really, really keen on at the moment is taking photographs of shops.
I just put of doing it!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
12,565 Posts
This isn t quite derelict yet, but it's empty and made [seriously] safe - including doors breeze blocked up. Kings Court - corner of Osborne Rd and Avenues.



Anyone know the score on this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
It's one of the lovely houses in Jesmond coved in arts and crafts details that I go on about!
Last I heard landlords were going to develop it.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
21,886 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
It's one of the lovely houses in Jesmond coved in arts and crafts details that I go on about!
Last I heard landlords were going to develop it.

Yes, indeed it is!

While the above two posts are quite appropriate to the "Gap Sites & Derelict Buildings" thread (where I copied them from) I thought a copy was also definitely appropriate to your thread, Grace.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
21,886 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
The new camera arrived at the same time as I got swamped with work!
Then I was able to spend productive time procrastinating over the work and the photography so thats a double score.
I "see" the photos all the time I just never have a camera with me.
What I am interested in taking pictures of houses, details of houses like the stained glass and doors, very interested in writings on buildings, painted sign writing and the thing I am really, really keen on at the moment is taking photographs of shops.
I just put of doing it!

Hi Grace,

How are you (and your camera) doing?

If you like, I can delete this thread?

It is a shame though, as it sounded like a good idea

:)

Regards,
NH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,630 Posts
Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle - information and pictures 17/05/15 Part 1 of a few

Follow up to comments made in posts over on the City Centre Residential thread after the "grey box" on the conversion works being carried out to 269 - 271 Westgate Road became apparent - see post http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=124078442&postcount=285

Summerhill Conservation Area

Well covered in a SUMMERHILL CONSERVATION AREA CHARACTER STATEMENT document initially produced by Newcastle Council in 2001, https://www.newcastle.gov.uk/wwwfileroot/legacy/regen/plantrans/conservation/Summerhill.pdf

and Information (some of it the same as in the NCC document) also on The Friends of Summerhill website, http://friendsofsummerhill.org.uk/

From that website, some information on the history of the area:-

A PLACE FOR COMMUNITY IN THE HEART OF NEWCASTLE

Summerhill Square is a hidden gem in Newcastle upon Tyne - a tranquil oasis just minutes away from Central Station, St. James’s Park and the busy central shopping areas of the city. Our aim is to make Summerhill an even better place to live, work and visit.


Extract from http://friendsofsummerhill.org.uk/summerhill/the-history-of-summerhill/

As Newcastle grew radically from the 1760s, the Westgate Township was one of the first areas to absorb expansion outside the town walls. The wealthy moved from the swarming riverside to new high-class areas up-wind of the furnaces and factories (eg. Charlotte Square). Summerhill soon became a sought-after place. Foster “Some notes on house building in Newcastle upon Tyne” (1981) gives a full account of the development sequence of the core area, broadly as follows:

Those along Westgate Hill were built in the 1810s by local builder Riddell Robson.

John Dobson is believed to have had a hand in the design of Greenfield Place, ostensibly built by R Maving by 1823.

Bragg’s son-in-law, Jonathan Priestman, continued to build, but covenants prevented this any closer than 100yds from the houses on the north side to maintain their value – Summerhill Grove, 1820, is therefore exactly 100yds across the nursery.

Ignatius Bonomi built his Tudor-style Priory next door in 1822. (previously covered in this forum on http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=111627153&postcount=4712 )

The nursery became a collection of gardens, summerhouses, walks and arbours on a grid-pattern for the housing around.

That part of Summerhill Terrace facing the square was built from the late 1830s to very full design specifications set out by Priestman to ensure the height, form, layout, materials, detailing and use related well to what had already been built.

Priestman laid out West Garden Street, now the bottom end of Summerhill Terrace overlooking Summerhill Grove’s gardens.

It was, therefore, a quirk of history which created the space around which the housing grew and, although called the Square, it was never actually a planned Georgian square as in London, Edinburgh or Dublin. Despite piecemeal development by speculative builders, continuity and uniformity were achieved.

Westgate Hill Cemetery opened in 1829.

Westgate Hill Terrace was built around 1840

York Street, etc. to the east, mostly built 1851-55.

John Dobson built Barber Surgeons’ Hall by 1850.

Winchester Terrace (originally Garden Terrace), 1850-1858, and 1-6 Summerhill Terrace, 1860-65, are the newest housing.

St Matthew’s was built in 1877, the tower in 1895. It is characteristic that little new development has taken place since this time, with later change being largely due to demolition in Sub-Area 2 and clearance on Westmorland Road, Summerhill Terrace and Westgate Hill Terrace.

20th century development includes:

Summerhill Bowling Club greens and clubhouse.

The synagogue (now offices) was built in 1925 on the site of three houses in Ravensworth Terrace.

The park laid out in 1935 for George V’s Silver Jubilee.

Our Lady & St Anne’s school was built on Summerhill Grove’s gardens and cleared land on Westmorland Road.

The 1980s social housing scheme by Nomad in a broadly sympathetic pastiche style was built on Summerhill Terrace.

The area was threatened during the 1960s and 1970s, including various plans for dual-carriageways through the central space, the Cemetery and Westgate Hill. However, the development pattern and evidence of historical growth remain substantially intact.


These screen prints of Google Map images to show the area in question

From "Classic Version" Google Maps



From the new version Google Maps with image "tilted"



Other maps etc to be seen in the SUMMERHILL CONSERVATION AREA CHARACTER STATEMENT document

On Sunday 17/05/15 took a lunchtime wander around some of the Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle and took pictures to show some of the properties, park, bowling greens etc at that time - to be posted in due course on a series of posts on this thread

Images hosted on Photobucket

KEN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,630 Posts
Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle - information and pictures 17/05/15 Part 2 of a few

Part 2

Follow up to post #5299

On Sunday 17/05/15 took a lunchtime wander around some of the Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle and took pictures to show some of the properties, park, bowling greens etc at that time

First St Anne's Court - previous coverage on post http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=111627153&postcount=4712, including

St Anne’s Court (listed Grade II, 1822 by Ignatius Bonomi, altered 1870s) is very different. Now a residential home (previously a house, convent and school), it has two tall sandstone storeys in a restrained Tudor Gothick style with trefoils, crosses, lancet windows, crested ridge tiles, timber dormers and tall clustered cylindrical chimneys. A tall boundary wall encircles the grounds (which contain a summerhouse and a large statue of Christ), creating a very private property.

From http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-304886-st-anne-s-convent-and-walls-attached-#.VVneRblViko

St Anne's Convent and Walls Attached, Newcastle upon Tyne - now St Anne's Court

Description: St Anne's Convent and Walls Attached

Grade: II
Date Listed: 30 March 1987
English Heritage Building ID: 304886

OS Grid Reference: NZ2392063992
OS Grid Coordinates: 423920, 563992
Latitude/Longitude: 54.9700, -1.6279
Location: 8 Summerhill Grove, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE4 6EE

Locality: Newcastle upon Tyne, County: Newcastle upon Tyne, Country: England, Postcode: NE4 6EE

NZ 26 SW and NZ 2364 SE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE SUMMERHILL GROVE
(south side) 11/538 and 18/538 St. Anne's Convent and Walls attached
GV II
House, later convent. Circa 1826 by Bonomi for Cuthbert Rippon of Stanhope Castle; addition of second floor and chapel and other alterations 1878 by Dunn and Hansom for St. Anne's Convent. Coursed squared sandstone with ashlar dressings; roofs of Welsh slate. Irregular plan, with roughly U-shaped ranges around a small yard.
Tudor style. Front to street: 2 storeys; 2 gable ends enclosing high wall; further wall at left. 4-bay range at rear of central yard; 2 boarded doors in wall, at left for pedestrians, and at left of yard for vehicles, have 2-centred arches with drip moulds. House entrance at right of yard has ledged boarded door in shouldered surround under stepped wall with stone cross finial. Irregular fenstration in left gable with square-headed stone-mullioned windows of one and 2 segment-headed lights, and gable peak with tall chimney. Right gable has 2 small rectangular chamfered lights at ground level and 6 lancets above. Roll-moulded copings to gables and walls. Rear yard range has windows similar to those in left gable in 3 bays; fourth bay an extruded staircase wing in similar style. 3 bargeboarded dormers. All chimneys stone with conjoined rounded shafts and steep coping.

Listing NGR: NZ2392063992

My pictures from17/05/15







this one from 2nd floor of one of the Winchester Terrace properties - thanks for the access Hugh



Images hosted on Photobucket

KEN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,630 Posts
Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle - information and pictures 17/05/15 Part 3 of a few

Part 3

Follow up to post #5299 - 5300

On Sunday 17/05/15 took a lunchtime wander around some of the Summerhill Conservation Area, Newcastle and took pictures to show some of the properties, park, bowling greens etc at that time

The Bowling Green and Park

Park, upper gate



View across park with Swinburne Place (terrace parallel with Westgate Rd) in background



Lower entrance, sign and view up the park







Edge of the park/bowling club on Summerhill Grove side



Bowling Club (now centre for Friends of Summerhill) as pictured from 1st and 2nd floors of one of the Winchester Terrace properties - thanks for the access Hugh









Images hosted on Photobucket

KEN
 
21 - 40 of 115 Posts
Top